162 Search Results: segmentation

List Segmentation: Gender

List Segmentation: Gender

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 30, 2018

We begin discussing the various ways you can segment your lists with the ways you can use gender to your favor. We also talk about the potential reasons not to use gender as a segmentation factor. You can be the judge. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer, we\'re gonna continue focusing on segmentation, and just talking about all of the different ways you can get to know your subscribers and pay attention to what they\'re doing so that you can be sending them the best possible email marketing messages. And it can all start with your sign-up forms. We spent weeks talking about how you grow your list. Well, with all those sign-up forms and all of those different touch-points we\'ve talked about, the fields you have in those sign-up forms can help you start your segmentation from the very beginning. And the first way we\'re gonna talk about is by gender. 01:00 Daniel Miller: So, when somebody fills out a sign-up form, in some cases, when it\'s relevant, you may wanna ask what is their gender. This specifically works really well for clothing stores, retail stores, and so forth, \'cause it helps you later on to market to the customer with the specific products that they may be interested in. Now, one thing that I highly recommend is just because somebody said that they were a female don\'t just send them clothes that relate to female or articles that are related to female \'cause you never know. It may be a female looking to buy for their partner, something like that. 01:33 AS: It\'s 2018, they might just prefer that style of clothing. 01:37 DM: That as well, [chuckle] absolutely. So always make sure to check when you segment for a specific thing. You wanna start slow and kinda get your feet wet and test it out, and don\'t go 100% certain on anything before you fully test it. 01:53 AS: Yeah, and aside from the type of products, because Daniel mentioned the reasons why you may not wanna limit the types of things you\'re showing to each gender, but it can also come down to the tone of voice you\'re using or the language you\'re using or how you\'re speaking to those people, whether it\'s boys or girls that may vary from time to time. 02:13 DM: Absolutely. And even the simple fact of... I mean, pretty much what you said, it\'s 2018 and a lot of this is changing. This may be old school still, but even the colors. And like you\'re saying, the voice, that can really make a big difference. Also when it comes down to values and what each gender may also stand for. Again, 2018, things are changing a lot. I agree with it, I think that it needs to go this way, it\'s long overdue, but let\'s focus on email marketing for this podcast. Pretty much going back to... I think what we\'re really pushing here is you wanna be as relevant as you possibly can to your subscriber. The more you can do that, the more engagement you\'re gonna receive. 02:57 AS: Absolutely. And we\'ve given a few different examples and being as woke as we can to this specific topic as we are two white males and having this conversation, but you\'ll see if it\'s working or not in your reports. And that\'s for a conversation much further down the line, but when you\'re doing any of these different types of segmentation, you\'re gonna see if it\'s working. You\'re gonna see if the clicks are increasing or decreasing, you\'re gonna see if the open rate is working based on the way you\'re saying things in your subject line, just like we\'re saying. If you wanna try and tailor your text to men or women, you\'ll see if that\'s working in your results. So, with segmentation, pay attention to if it\'s working in your reports and stay tuned \'cause we\'re gonna dive deep into that later. But, as we\'ve said, gender is the first one we\'re gonna talk about. There\'s a lot more, but it all begins with the fields you have in your sign-up forms, and it\'s as simple as a little check box for male or female if you are gonna do marketing like that, it\'s gonna help you get started with segmenting your list. And we\'ll catch you next time when we talk about the next type of segmentation that you can start straight from your sign-up forms. Thanks for listening.  


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Know Your Subscribers: Segmentation

Know Your Subscribers: Segmentation

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 29, 2018

Part of getting to know your subscribers is not treating them all as if they\'re the same person. That\'s where segmentation comes into play. Discover the ways you can sort your subscribers into groups that will let you send targeted, relevant content to each segment. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re gonna continue our conversation talking about knowing your subscribers and the way you do that is with segmentation. We danced around saying it in the last episode, \'cause we knew we have a whole lot of segmentation coming up, but we\'re talking about all the different ways you can do it, but this episode is gonna be what it even is. So what is segmentation, Daniel? 00:44 Daniel Miller: So, when it comes to the segmentation, I\'m sure we all have the signup form on our site. Everybody starts filling that out, but the question is, does everybody really... It\'s not a one-size-fits-all. So by segmenting your list of subscribers or customers, you can really start to kinda build a personalized experience for that type of person. What I mean by that is you can segment your subscribers based on interests, maybe based on their demographic, you can also maybe segment your subscribers based on previous purchase history or activity on your emails and site. There\'s a million different ways that you can segment your list, but the bottom line is the reason why you wanna segment is so you\'re as relevant as you possibly can be with each of your subscribers. 01:31 AS: Absolutely, and it really doesn\'t even matter what you\'re selling. And we mentioned this before, you probably have a wide array of products or services that you\'re offering and each customer is gonna be a little bit different. You don\'t sell to 100 clones of the same person, or more. It\'s different based on each different group and segment that you create and the thing you need to do, as an email marketer, to not seem clueless when you\'re sending out those emails, is to understand what those differences are and get to know those people. And like we mentioned in the last episode, those are real humans on the other side of those email addresses. And you need to start to understand things about those people. Daniel mentioned creating the persona of your subscribers. Download a picture, put it on the wall, look at that and write to that kind of group of person but take it even deeper. I mean, think about what does this person drive? What kind of food do they like to eat? Where do they shop for clothes? Any of those things... What blogs do they read? Any of those things are gonna help you understand that segment of your list and get to know how you can do your email marketing to that segment even better. 02:42 DM: Absolutely, and I say this all the time. I mean, any product or service, there\'s a million competitors out there. It\'s a rare case in this day and age that there\'s one company doing one specific thing. And because of that, a lot of people, because they have so many choices, they\'re gonna wanna choose the company that they feel that speaks to them, whether that\'s based on the design, based on the values, whatever that is, they\'re really gonna start to split hairs in that kind of way. So again, the more you can adapt to that and the more relevant you can be by segmenting your list, can be very helpful. And that\'s at the top of the funnel level. Once they\'re actually engaging with you, segmenting takes a whole new level of engagement to really make sure that when your subscribers subscribes to your emails, they\'re not just getting a generic email that everyone else is getting, you\'re providing a custom experience for them that adds value to the experience with you, so. 03:38 AS: Absolutely. And just to continue on ways in which you can understand each segment of your list, think about it in a way of, \"What problem am I solving for this group of people?\" Because based on what you have, you\'re a toy company maybe it\'s, \"Hey, I like that these toys are educational,\" Or some parents are like, \"I just need them to not bother me for a little while,\" or whatever that is. It\'s you\'re solving different problems and you can speak to them in that way, in that segment, to make sure you\'re doing great relevant email marketing. So what would an example of this be, Daniel? 04:10 DM: An example of something for a specific problem... Well, here\'s an example. Okay, and this is based on maybe a buying behavior, right. Let\'s say that I own a pool store and somebody comes in and they buy a bag of chlorine for their pool. And I know that that bag of chlorine is gonna last about six months, right? I may not wanna put that person in the same stream of emails of all my other people that are getting different promotions. I may wanna create a specific segment for that person, that relates to people that have bought pool products related to chlorine and I know that that chlorine bag lasts about six months, in five-and-a-half months an email may shoot out to that person, with maybe a discount or a special promotion for their next bag of chlorine. The bottom line of what you\'re trying to do there is you\'re trying to relate to their experience and you\'re trying to engage with them in such a level that they know that you understand exactly their needs so they\'re gonna come back to shop with you in the future. 05:09 AS: Definitely. Another example is say you\'re a pet shop. There\'s cat people and there\'s dog people. And sure, there\'s some people at the center of that Venn diagram that spend their days watching YouTube videos of different types of animals being friends that you wouldn\'t expect and they might love both cat and dog information, but overall, if you\'re a cat person, you don\'t care about the new dog toys or dog food or dog treats, or leashes, just as dog owners don\'t care about the scratch pads or catnip or whatever else cat people like. I\'m a dog person, so I don\'t... That\'s the end of my cat interest list. But if you\'re sending the right, relevant information to those, that\'s how you\'re gonna make sales and that\'s why we\'re an email marketer insurance to create relationships with your customers, and that\'s how you\'re gonna do it, by making them feel heard and seen in your email marketing. 06:00 DM: Yeah, exactly. 06:01 AS: All right, we\'ll catch you guys next time as we continue this conversation and start to talk about the different types of segmentation that you could be doing.    


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Practical Strategies for List Segmentation & Automation Pro

Practical Strategies for List Segmentation & Automation Pro

Practical Marketer • February 21, 2018

List segmentation with email automation is the best way to send targeted, relevant content to your customers that will create a feeling of personalization for each individual subscriber. Being able to follow-up with subscribers based on their interactions with your email campaigns and website while combining that with list segments, creates multiple levels of personalization that will create ongoing engagement. Before we jump into some strategy for you to execute for your next customer journey, let’s take a look at why doing this is so important. Car Insurance Automation Fail A few years back, my car got in the line of fire from a neighbor moving their possessions out and through our lot into a truck. So, I called my insurance company and they sent someone out to take a look at the damages. They told me that since the damages existed in two places (a dresser was dropped on my car), I would have to pay two deductibles. This also included a possible increase in my rates. However, across the alley from our parking lot was an auto body shop. So, I asked the guy at the shop what he thought of the insurance assessment. He told me he would fix it for me at a much lower cost if I chose not to go through insurance. It was a number I could live with and I’d avoid the headache of higher car insurance premiums. I canceled my claim. My car was fixed and I forgot about it completely. That is until I got an email from my car insurance company that included: I got a note from our claims department that you were pretty happy with the way we handled your claim. I’m glad that worked out for you. Not only that, but they tried to upsell me with renters insurance to boot. This was an automation that was triggered upon a claim being closed. However, without segments, the automation assumed all closed claims were happy customers. Wrong. Now, do you see why segmentation is an important part of your automation? How You Could Use List Segmentation & Automation We love our pets around here. See? It should surprise nobody that we continually use a pet store as an example. Say a customer comes into the store and agrees to join your email list upon their visit. You notice they’ve bought dog food, some chew toys and bones and some dog treats. You can add them to your customer list, but it would be to your advantage to add them to a Dog Owner segment of that list. That way a customer journey can be automated for dog owners upon entry to that segment. Follow-ups can include campaigns centered around new toys, the latest treats and other items to enrich the life of a dog. As a dog owner, I know how susceptible I am to wanting to buy all of the cute things and treats that I have to remind myself not to eat. You don’t have to believe me, though. According to the DMA, targeted and segmented campaigns generate 58% of all email marketing revenue. Let’s take it a step further. If you’ve used the website engagement feature in Automation Pro, you can follow up with the people in your Dog Owner segment based on the goods they view on your website. Follow-ups can be triggered if they’re looking at new dog beds or the new line of Star Wars toys (of which my dog destroyed her BB-8 fetch toy in a matter of seconds). They’re already showing interest in those items, so a triggered campaign containing those goods may just be the reminder they need to purchase. Continuing with more segmentation, maybe all Dog Owners go into one list for you. The segments are created based on their dog food of choice. If you’re paying attention to their purchase history, you’ll see what’s been bought and maybe even how often. You can automate follow-ups based on when they’re almost in need of more food. Have a campaign sent at that point, maybe even with a small discount to buy then, and you’ll have a loyal customer earned thanks to list segmentation and automation. So, next time you go to create a new customer journey remember how much more relevant your email campaigns can be if you combine list segmentation with email marketing. It’s your best chance at creating that feeling of one-to-one communication with your subscribers … even when it’s an automated campaign that’s running while you’re out at the dog park.


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Harnessing the Power of Email Marketing Segmentation

Harnessing the Power of Email Marketing Segmentation

Practical Marketer • February 12, 2018

Fun fact: every day more than 200 billion email are sent all over the world. Long considered the granddaddy of digital marketing, the astonishing number of email sent every day just goes to show how relevant is email in this day age. There are many reasons why email is so effective. First of all, everyone in digital has an email address. More than Facebook or any other social media platform, email is the most ubiquitous digital platform for users. In fact, you cannot sign on to Facebook without an email address. Think of the potential reach you can have. Next, you are sure that the message is received and delivered. On other platforms, your paid advertising efforts depend on its ability to attract that audience. Email is a direct shot to hearts and minds of your users. Email is also an open platform. Nearly everyone can shoot out an email to a person. No one entity controls the ebb and flow of email, unlike Facebook or Instagram which are governed by algorithms that change on a regular basis. Finally, email is here to stay. Social media has a lifespan. Think of how many social media platforms have come and gone. Friendster and MySpace have gone the way of the dinosaur, forgotten relics of a bygone age. Snapchat and Twitter are both fighting for survival. Only one constant remains - the email. Given that, why is that most email marketing schemes fail? Most of the email you send to your email list are left unopened, contributing no clicks and no conversions. The biggest mistake email marketers fall into is sending their email with their offer to all the people in their list. They rarely tailor fit their email to their target audience, making the message lost in the hundreds of email received by a potential customer every day. The secret therefore to a successful email campaign is the concept of segmentation. You divide your email list into specific segments, and tailor fit your content for their consumption. This requires you to know your audience more. The great Sun Tzu once said that you must know your enemy as you know yourself. The more information you have on your target market, the better you can segment.   There are many ways to segment your marketing. Here are a few: GEOGRAPHICAL 1) Location The most basic way to segment is by location. First of all, if you have a global market, then you can tailor fit your content by country, city and area to regional and culture idiosyncrasies. For example, here’s an email sent by Spotify, to their subscribers who follows and listens to LANY, Zedd and more – about their concerts near your area. Moreover, the concept of time zones come into play. There usually is a best time to send an email and each time zone has its own best time to send. Demographical 2) Age Age groups are a great way of segmenting your market. Age groups have different backgrounds and a different mindset. Generation Z is swimming in tech and digital, millennials are flighty and restless, Gen Xers are hard-nosed and to the point, and Baby Boomers yearn for nostalgia. Each age group has certain world views where you can make specific appeals to purchase. Here’s one example from an email campaign sent by Adobe about their promotions exclusively for students. 3) Gender The gender spectrum has multiple segmentation opportunities. Each ray of the gender spectrum has specific needs and wants and can be addressed directly in your messaging. As more and more people are open to the gender spectrum, with platforms openly acknowledging different genders, it gives you the ability to tweak your message for maximum effect. Here’s an example of an email campaign sent by NIKE, catering to women, young adults and age ranges from 18-26 years old. 4) Job Function Email can also be sent via job function. Gatekeepers like secretaries and personal assistants are great targets for segmentation because they control the flow of information to the decision makers. Getting on the good side of gatekeepers through thoughtful email can do wonders for your business. Here’s an email sent by HubSpot indicating a link to an article that talks about neuroscience for marketing experts. Psychographics 5) Persona Personality is a broad term, but you could also segment via personality. People who identify as introverts could be open to content about activities that can be done indoors. Gaming and e-books are a great marketing play for the introverted set. On the other hand, more outdoorsy offerings can be sent to identified extroverts. 6) Lifestyle Lifestyle is also a big segmentation opportunity. Take, for example, flight attendants. Flight attendants fly in and out of countries every day. This allows you to make offerings that are tied to the jet-set lifestyle. Hotel offerings with discounts for short layovers can be sent to flight attendants who want to rest and freshen up. These are the broad segmentations. You could segment on a more granular level. 7) Interests Subcultures are a powerful niche marketing segmentation. For example, Star Wars fans are more likely to respond to Star Wars content especially if you send that out on May 4 (May the 4th be with you). Behavioral 8) Past Purchase An old e-commerce marketing technique is to create market basket analysis. People who purchase one product usually end up purchasing another product and patterns begin to appear. Analytics can be used to create a basket of goods where you can target users who purchased one product with an offering for another product. If they are in the same market basket group, more or less you could expect a bigger chance for a conversion. 9) Buying Frequency E-commerce platforms could usually track how much a user buys over a certain period of time. A frequent buyer would be a great person to send a frequent user discount while a user that has not bought in a long while can be sent a welcome back offering. 10) Website Behavior Even website behavior can be segmented. Window shoppers, people who just visit a website but do not make a purchase, are great people to send promotions that will nudge them into making a purchase. This example was sent by ZALORA informing their subscribers that their favorite brands are on sale and encouraging them to make a purchase, again. 11) Email Engagement Email engagement is also a great segmentation opportunity. Non-openers and people who do not click are a good segment to cull from your email lists. If you have likely gotten emails from brands saying, “We’ve missed you!”. These were probably the brands whose email you have not opened in a while. A great example would be the email sent by Uber, to those riders who were not booking lately. Conclusion Email is one of the most powerful ways to engage your audience. But it will all be for naught if you do a shotgun approach to marketing. Segmentation with market-specific content will go a long way to improving your open, click through and conversion metrics. Are you having trouble dividing your email lists into more specific and unified segments? Does this article help you to overcome it? If so, let me know in the comment section below. We would be happy to hear from you!


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Heart of Business Round Table: Types of List Segmentation

Heart of Business Round Table: Types of List Segmentation

Beyond • September 13, 2015

In anticipation of our upcoming webinar, \"Target Marketing: How to Hit Your Bullseye,\" we decided to have the Heart of Business Round Table team sit down and discuss list segmentation. Your ability to do target marketing stems directly from the data you have and how well you segment your lists, so it\'s an important step not to be overlooked. We go through a list of various ways in which an email marketer can do list segmentation. Don\'t miss this very special webinar, being hosted by Benchmark Email Director of Sales & Marketing Daniel Miller and Insightpool CEO Devon Wijesinghe. Target Marketing in email and social media will be the focus, as Devon and Daniel demonstrate the best ways in which to deliver the most relevant content to your audience. The webinar is on Tuesday, September 15th at 11:00AM PDT. Don\'t miss out! Register for \"Target Marketing: How To Hit Your Bullseye.\"


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The Top 5 Email Segmentations You May Not Be Using

Beyond • September 8, 2014

If you’ve been an email marketer for more than about ten minutes, you are certainly no stranger to the necessity to segment your email subscription lists in order to obtain the best possible results from your campaign. However, you may be finding yourself a bit stultified and flummoxed by the prospect of having to come up with some new and different criteria to apply to your segmentation efforts. In that case never fear as all you need to do is check out some of these top five segmentation strategies in order to implement them into your list management duties and presto, you’ll be a segmentation star! 1. Evangelists – An extremely lucrative segment of your entire email marketing list is the customers who love your brand so much that they have become advocates and evangelists for you. These people spend a part of their valuable time in talking up your brand to their social media circles, and thus they deserve far more than your conventional email content. This is the segment that you should definitely splurge on, with incentivized offers for loyalty programs, discounts and special offers which they receive when they refer any of their friends, and even special sneak peeks into upcoming products and services. 2. Changers – You may have long time customers which suddenly demonstrate a drastic shift in buying patterns. Perhaps they were spending a thousand dollars on your site in the run up to each holiday season and the last one was fifty bucks, or maybe they went the opposite way and started buying up your offerings as if you were running a fire sale. Either way, these subscribers deserve your attention with special email content. The customers which seem to be fading away could possibly be brought back to their previous buying volumes with valuable offers targeted directly to their previous purchasing behavior, while the ones who have shown significant increase in ordering might be encouraged to buy more if they receive considerable incentives and even volume discounts. 3. Timers – An inordinate amount of valuable information on the level of interest that your subscriber has in your brand may be gleaned simply through the determination of how long they have actually paid attention to your content. If they have clicked onto your webinar or podcast and then fled within 60 seconds, then you can be fairly confident that you are not capturing their hearts and minds. However, if they have stayed engaged until the end of the entire 45 minute duration, you can bet that these are customers which you can count on to have a marked level of brand loyalty and interest. By determining just how interested your subscribers are in your brand’s content you’ll be able to deliver them the email content that will best engage them. 4. Seasonals – There are some customers who are strictly seasonal purchasers and when you are able to identify those patterns you can certainly put them to good use. The ultimate seasonality is the one surrounding placing presents under the Christmas trees, but there are as many seasonal patterns to customer purchasing as there are calendar events tied into specific product and service offerings. Is your tech customer only buying between Black Friday and Cyber Monday? Is your beach lover only ordering in June? No matter what the seasonal behavior you can motivate your customer to consider out-of-season ordering by providing them with email content which demonstrates the value you can provide at times other than their favorite buying season. 5. Crazies – Yes, you read correctly… the crazies. These are the subscribers who you can’t seem to figure out as they don’t seem to show any sort of pattern at all. They buy when they feel like it, jump around among your offering categories, and generally act like they have a randomizer in their craniums. Instead of pitching everything including the kitchen sink at them, provide email content which directs them to your more lucrative categories and you might see a dollar value jump in their ordering. There are countless criteria for segmentation, but try these out and you may be pleasantly surprised.


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Email List Segmentation Strategies You Might Not Have Thought Of

Email List Segmentation Strategies You Might Not Have Thought Of

Beyond • December 2, 2013

You can’t possibly call yourself an email marketer unless you already have all of your subscription lists duly segmented by age, gender, geography, and behavior, however there are various other categorization options which can provide even more advanced and finely grained segmentation for your lists and which you might never have previously considered. The applications and relevance of these segmentation categories will vary from business to business but with a little research you might find one or two that could be exactly what your segmentation strategy is missing right now. Shipping behavior can be a key indicator There is a wealth of information that can be derived by simply examining the addresses that the customer has used as ship-tos in their previous purchases through your online presence. The essential division is whether they buy to ship to their own address, which indicates that they are primarily purchasing for their own and their family’s needs, or if they are providing a different ship-to address which would telegraph that they are buying for gift giving. Although this is not an iron-clad division as some people may choose to have a product shipped to themselves which they will then gift to someone else directly by handing it to them, it is a good indication of the type of shopper that they are. An even closer correlation can be drawn in examining the self-ship to other-ship ratio at particular times of the year such as the holiday season and whether they are bulking up their purchases in two or three specific times of the year (indicating loved one’s birthdays). Customers’ tendency to review should be targeted It goes without saying that your analytics strategy tracks the ongoing chatter about your brand across the internet, so your ability to correlate what your customer has stated about your brand in this public arena is one of the primary ways to achieve elevated and advanced segmentation. Discovering which ones of your customers are more active in writing reviews and passing on their opinions about your brand and its products and services can help you target these influencers to a greater degree and thus result in a greater volume of positive discussion online. There are some customers who can’t buy a Twinkie at a gas station without writing an online review and others who would not mention anything even on their Facebook pages with privacy settings at maximum if they were purposely set on fire at the same station. The segmentation into active vs. inactive online reviewers can provide significant benefits which manifest themselves at the all-important check out. Comments on current events provide critical insight Although it is an exaggeration to state that a Tea Party member would be more likely to be perusing your rifle department while an Obama Democrat would prefer to check out your energy saving green roof shingle section, the opinions of your customers as expressed online about aspects other than your brand can certainly be leveraged to provide critical segmentation data. These opinions need not be solely limited to politics as even the way that they comment on current events can provide valuable insight into the “type of customer” that they are. A pattern of concerned commenting on pollution issues can indicate a tendency towards purchasing air and water purification systems, while a customer who regularly comments on the rising cost of living could be targeted for cost saving discounts and your more economical product ranges. On the other hand, the customer who provides comments on how he’ll be the first in line on the debut date to buy the newest Mercedes Benz can be categorized into your more highly priced product category. By applying even just a bit of your time and energy to figuring out which alternative segmentation strategies best fit your business you might be able to come up with the one that’s just perfect and results in a marked jump in your metrics. Break away from the stultified demographic and behavior segmentation categories you’ve been using since the dawn of email marketing and get creative! In email segmentation, brand success favors the innovative marketer!


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The Art of Segmentation: Creating a Customer Profile

The Art of Segmentation: Creating a Customer Profile

Beyond • June 18, 2013

Marketing roles are confounded from the noise produced by social and new media, both of which are treated like a shouting match by many companies. Having a presence isn’t enough. Having a strong presence with active involvement doesn’t cut it either. It only adds to the noise. The problem with all these measures is that it fails in being able to isolate a target market. It’s akin to setting up shop and calling out to a client base when the fog’s too thick to see who’s out there. In order to get it right, companies need to be able to identify their core customer base. Once that’s done, businesses can take a tactical approach that does two things: (1) establish market segmentation, and (2) strategize campaign implementation. When a company segments the market, it means they’re stepping away from a marketing plan with wide appeal. No company will appeal to everyone, and as such it’s a waste of time and other resources to try and appeal to a general consumer base. Segmentation is also often used to develop several different types of customer profiles. The average business can safely segment their customers into 4 categories: geographic, demographic, psychographic, and behavioral. Geographically, an owner might target customers in a specific zip code, while in a demographic market segmentation research he might discover that his best bet is targeting married couples above a certain income. Alternatively, psychological segmentation targets personality and lifestyle whereas behavioral profiling “analyzes characteristics such as desired product benefits, price sensitivity and brand loyalty,” which are best used to determine buying patterns. The next step is digging elbow deep into research tactics that produce a wealth of data about your customer base, which you can then segment into appropriate profiles. There are several winning strategies out there and key among them is the survey. Surveys should include a diverse panel of target types, including “current customers, past customers, non-purchasing prospects, in-process prospects, leads, and website visitors.” What gets filtered into a survey depends largely on when you’re requesting a survey. General surveys should cover a broad range of issues. They should include questions that specify demographics and other factors that would help marketers segment the profile. Because it can be challenging to solicit survey replies, marketers should take advantage of key opportunities to get survey responses. These are post meeting and post sale surveys; the latter can also include surveys 3-6 months post encounter to ensure continued customer satisfaction and take advantage of any opportunities for a follow up transaction. To get the best segmentation results that can help further campaign reach, try and create unique surveys per business type. As a rule of thumb, customers can get 25 or fewer questions; prospects 15 or fewer; and leads 10 or fewer. The result of any survey is to help flesh out a profile, which will be particularly useful when “targeting ad buys; writing effective marketing messages; creating promotions and purchase incentives; developing and pricing products and assessing competitive threats.”


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How to Lose an Email Subscriber Part 1: Lousy Email Segmentation

How to Lose an Email Subscriber Part 1: Lousy Email Segmentation

Beyond • August 11, 2011

You know what it takes to make me want to hit the unsubscribe button these days? 32.1 miles. That’s the distance between Huntington Beach, CA and the beautiful city of San Juan Capistrano. Today I\'ll use a personal anecdote (and a tasty temptation) to illustrate how a strategic email marketing tactic can backfire if exercised in an un-strategic way. I Love Getting Targeted Emails In perusing today’s emails, I came across a great deal from a daily email deal list. This one looked straight up tasty: Oh man, I’m a sucker for pizza… especially good pizza. Who isn’t? And though my cravings lean toward the NYC style, I’ve great memories of Chicago’s version with its iconic thick crust… I remember walking 25 minutes in the snow from world famous Giardano’s back to our hotel and opening up the box to still piping hot, incredible pizza pie! I even left to go out for more than a few hours, came back and enjoyed that last slice more because somehow it had gotten better sitting in the box on the counter all night. Whoa, sorry, I think I was dreaming for a second, because I woke up chewing my pillowcase. Okay, whatever. If there’s a great Chicago style pizza within sniffing distance, I’m in. But Please Be on Target The question is: what exactly is sniffing distance? For that matter, what’s an acceptable drive for good pizza? What’s an acceptable drive for $15 off good pizza? The pizza place in the email (Vito’s) is exactly 32.1 miles away from me. And even though San Juan Capistrano is an amazingly beautiful city, Vito’s might as well be in Chicago because I won’t be in either of those cities tonight. Segmenting by Location Only Has a Few Mile Range for Low Price Items Listen, email list segmentation of a zip code is a great thing, but not if it doesn’t make sense for the recipient. If I get a coupon for a few thousand off of a new car, a 30 mile drive is nothing. But it just doesn’t work for pizza. I wouldn’t blame Vito’s Pizza shop for this (I’m sure they just signed up for this email blast and didn’t do the segmenting themselves), but I don’t need to hear about a food deal that isn’t in my local neighborhood. How about something in a city that at least borders my hometown? I Wonder Who Hit the Unsubscribe Button? So what’s my tolerance for this kind of mis-segmentation? Hmmmn, not too much, I guess. But the emails from Living Social do look very delicious, so I guess I won’t hit unsubscribe just yet. A well laid out email is always welcome in my inbox, so I’ll hang on for just a few more weeks. But I need to look at emails to have something to write about. Your average customer doesn’t. All is not lost though. Next time I’m visiting the mission in San Juan Capistrano, I’ll look up Vito’s Pizza. I’ll even pay full price.


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Maximize Home Improvement Marketing through Email Segmentation

Beyond • July 11, 2011

The recent Marketing Sherpa study entitled 2011 Landing Page Optimization Benchmark Report provides a perspective on how over 2,000 sampled email marketers are implementing various factors in their landing pages. This report provides insight critical to the achievement of any Home Improvement business’s email campaign goals. The study showed that various segmentation tactics utilized by email marketers have varying levels of effectiveness: Past Purchase History: 48% The most effective category is segmentation of your customers according to what they’ve previously purchased. In order to take advantage of this highly fruitful segmentation it is important to categorize your subscribers according to the type of products they have ordered in the past. If they are primarily tool & hardware buyers, you will find that they have a very different customer profile than the individuals who buy lawn & garden, home décor, appliances or even building materials. Their invoice size will also inform you of whether they are weekend DIYers or professional contractors: a determination that will enable you to provide the email content most suited to the type and volume of products they require from your Home Improvement business. Seasonality: 37% The Home Improvement sector is by its inherent nature a seasonal one. Lawn & garden spikes in the spring and summer, while interior remodeling and indoor hobbyist supplies such as Dremel tools surge in the winter when your customers are stuck in their homes. Segmenting your customers according to the time of year that they click-through to your site will demonstrate to you the kind of content your subscriber is going to be most interested in and, most importantly, the time of the year when they will be susceptible to your offers. Site Browsing Patterns: 34% Where they go on your website and how much time they dwell on each section can divulge a wealth of information about a customer’s interests and likelihood to convert to a purchase on a specific item. The data you collect through Google Analytics or other similar functions can allow you to understand that the purchaser of the $30 Ryobi 9.6-Volt Cordless Drill spent several minutes on the Milwaukee M28 Cordless 28-Volt 1/2 in. Hammer Drill page. You can take a direct action and provide this customer a 10% discount on that specific drill that will drop the price from $600 to $540 and may motivate them enough to take the plunge. Geographic Origin: 33% Segmentation according to where your customer is located is another powerful factor to take into consideration. The customer who lives across two county lines is going to have to be incentivized to a far greater degree than the one who resides within walking distance. The further away your customer lives the more competitors are closer to them, so you will have to offer outstanding advantages to secure their business. The customers who live closer to you won’t require such powerful incentives, so you can crank back the deep discounts on the $8,000 GE Profile stainless steel 25.2 cubic foot side-by-side refrigerator and the two for one offers on batts of pink fiberglass insulation when emailing to them. Device Type: 26% The way that your customer accesses your emails is also an important factor in the segmentation process. Access from a smartphone indicates a different customer profile than a tablet, which is also quite different from a desktop or laptop computer. Correlating the types of devices your customers utilize to their purchasing patterns can help you determine whether a smartphone user is more likely to be in the market for lawn tractors or bidets. Returning vs. New Visitors: 24% This segmentation category had the lowest effectiveness of all the factors measured. Whether this is a prospect’s first visit to your site or if they are habitual frequenters should not be ignored, but it seems to not make as much of an impact as some of the other factors. The study proves that segmentation is an essential crux of any email campaign, and by structuring your segmentation according to its findings you can measurably increase your overall promotional efficiency.


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