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Best Welcome Email Subject Lines to Greet Your New Subscribers

Best Welcome Email Subject Lines to Greet Your New Subscribers

Beyond • August 27, 2018

The first email that you send to your new subscribers can work wonders for your relationship with them (first impressions are the most lasting, remember?). The fact that you have them on board doesn’t mean they’re ready to open and click on future emails, let alone trust you with their needs. In fact, they can use that first email to see if your business is reliable and trustworthy. So, capitalizing on this opportunity is crucial to set a foundation for a strong, long-term relationship with them. To help you roll the right digital welcome mat and increase the effectiveness of your email marketing, I’ve prepared a guide with the best welcome email subject lines that get clicks. Welcome Email Statistics To help you get a better understanding of why it’s so important to get your welcome email right, let’s quickly explore the experiences of other businesses through statistics: Welcome emails have 4x open rate and 5x click-through rate than other email marketing Welcome emails are the most effective email types for e-commerce brands So, as you can see, welcome emails are pretty special. And, as a marketer or a business owner, you know that a higher open rate and click-through rate equals more customers and traffic on your website. According to Asperian report on email marketing, 93 percent of email marketers use welcome emails at least monthly. Moreover, the report claims that welcome emails outperform regular promotional emails in terms of transaction rate and revenue per email as well. Subject lines in welcome emails are a big part of their success. It’s the first thing that the customer sees when the message arrives in their inbox, so it determines the outcome of the email even before the content is viewed. Besides, a lot of your customers expect you to send them a welcoming email! In fact, one report suggested that up to 74 percent of new subscribers expect to receive them as soon as they sign up. So, one thing is clear: you need welcome emails to improve your email marketing effort. Since subject lines are critical for the success, let’s see how you can master them to maximize the open rate of your emails. Welcome Email Subject Lines and Why They’re Good 1. Offer a Friendship The following email example comes from Holland & Barrett, a UK-based health retailer. The subject line in their welcome emails reads: “Welcome to Holland & Barett… Let’s get to know each other…” As you can see, they also used a bit of humor in the email to reinforce the message that the brand is looking to establish a friendly relationship. 2. Offer an Incentive Right Away The next example comes from Highway Robbery, a company that sells colorful robes. As you can see, the subject line they choose to go with was “Welcome to the Robbery (discount inside).” This choice clearly seeks to incentivize the viewer to open the email and see what kind of discount they can get (by the way, it’s 10 percent off the first order, which is pretty good for just signing up). So the takeaway here is that you can try to offer an incentive to your new subscribers to persuade them to open the welcome email. This also works for making the brand look generous. Another reason why this email is good because it stimulates to make a purchase in a non-promotional, sweet way. That’s good, because subject lines that sound too pushy and promotional will be deleted right away. 3. Represent Your Brand Clearly The style of communication with your customers matters, so you need to make sure that your own style matches the image of your brand. If you’ve established a certain style of communication, stick to it in your email marketing to avoid confusing your customers and making it easy to memorize your brand. A great example of representing a brand through communication style comes from KFC. The subject line of their welcome email reads: “Howdy, folks!” This phrase is a typical one used by the brand to refer to its customers. In fact, here’s KFC using the same greeting on its official account on Twitter. This works for well-known brands best, but can also be used for businesses trying to promote some slogans to help customer memorize them. 4. Show Immediate Value for Customers The following example of a great welcome email comes from HelloFresh, a UK-based company specializing in delivering fresh dishes to customers. Their site has an exciting tool called Flavor Generator which does exactly what its name says: generates recipes from different cuisines, including Indian, Italian, British, and others. Those who played the flavor generator for the first time are greeted with a welcome email like the one below. The recipient specified that they liked British food, so the email is all about that. It contains lots of free recipes of British food, which could be used by the recipient right away. This is a great example of a business showing an immediate value to the customer, in a really cool way. The subject line is good because it: Thanks the recipient for taking the time to play the flavor generator Provides an immediate value by providing recipes of the cuisine that the recipient is interested in 5. Praise the New Subscribers for Their Decision Many brands praise their customers and endorse their choice for subscribing to their newsletters. For example, a well-known fashion brand Rue La La sends out welcome emails with a subject line that reads: “This was a good decision.” The email immediately explains why the decision was good. For example, it says that the website has offers from best-selling brands at “jaw-dropping prices,” international shipping from USD 9.95, and multiple checkout options. And, of course, the email calls the recipient a “stylish friend,” which is also a way to connect with them on a personal level. 6. Tell Them Who You Are and Engage from Day One Check out the welcome email below. It was delivered with a subject line “You’re In. Welcome to Adidas.” It combines two powerful welcome email techniques: telling the subscribers about the essence of the brand and encouraging them to take action right away. The subject line emphasizes that Adidas is an authoritative brand and the phrase “You’re in” certainly seeks to make the recipient feel special and a part of a big family of sports lovers. As you can see, the content in the email supports the idea of the subject line. Adidas wants the recipient to think of the experience with the brand as a journey. The company is also encouraging the recipient to make the first purchase by providing a unique promo code to claim a 15 percent off. Some of the options for the first purchase are also provided to encourage the recipient some more. 7. Thank Your Subscribers A simple “thank you” is a powerful way to add a human quality to your email and begin building brand loyalty. Using this phrase in a welcome emails means that you want to show your new subscribers that you appreciate them. In the future, when a subscriber is ready to make a purchase, they will remember that you made them feel good from the very beginning of the relationship. Here’s an example of a welcome email along with the subject line that a Polish fashion brand Reserved uses to greet its new subscribers. Notice the address of the recipient: it says “Friend!” Reserved also provides a discount as another “thank you” for signing up. That’s also recommended to begin building brand loyalty and a positive relationship. 8. Use Emojis with Care! Emojis are fun, but you should use them carefully to increase the open rate and greet your new subscribers in the right way. Recipients can misunderstand the subject lines written without emojis because of the lack of non-verbal elements. It’s recommended to use emojis only when you’re including emotional words to make the subject line sound like a subject of an email from a friend. Let’s Recap the Best Practices Make it easy to understand. As you can see, all the words in subject lines in emails above are simple, one or two syllable words. In other words, they use simple, natural language and avoid complex words because it’s difficult to memorize them. Always focus on the needs of the recipients. The recipient is the center of the universe for you in this case, so you have to consider their needs if your target audience in the design of your welcome email subject line. For example, if English is not the native language of your recipients, find a translation agencies list to make sure that your message is understood. Keep it short. The average length of the subject lines in all examples of welcome emails in this article is 6.5 words. It ensures that a recipient can read the line quickly. Avoid ambiguity. Be specific and clear in your subject line because you don’t have all time in the world to attract the attention of the recipient. The Next Step As you can see, there are many different techniques to greet your new subscribers. If you’re not sure whether one option is hitting the right chord, feel free to test another one. In fact, create three different versions of welcome email subject lines and see what one performs best. And don’t forget to tell us about it in the comments below!


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8/24/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

8/24/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

Beyond • August 24, 2018

Hey everybody! Sorry I missed last week\'s digest. To be fair, it was in the name of love. We kept the episodes rolling every weekday, while I was in Chicago for a couple of weddings. The good news is, my best man speech went well ... and we\'re back with the blog digest of our most recent episodes of the Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer podcast (my employers may question the order I placed those in). Growing a List: Location Location! Location! Location! We talked about the importance of timing last episode, but one factor in that timing is where on the page a signup form is located. Do you want your form above-the-fold, in the sidebar or the footer? Listen to find out. Growing a List: Popup vs. Standard Embed Signup Forms In this episode, we talk about the times you\'ll want to use a popup signup form or a standard embeddable one. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. Learn when to employ each of them to grow your list. Growing a List: Exit-Intent Signup Forms If a visitor leaves your website without subscribing to your list, they may be gone for good. Don\'t let that happen! Catch them on their way out the door with an exit-intent signup form. Learn how in this episode. Growing a List: Freebies, Discounts & Special Offers Last episode we talked about the exit-intent signup form. There are a few different approaches you can take with that strategy. This episode discusses using them to offer freebies, discounts and special offers. Growing a List: Shopping Cart We continue talking about the different types of exit-intent pop-up forms by discussing the shopping cart. If someone places an item in your eCommerce shopping cart but doesn\'t make a purchase, you can catch them on the way out with a popup signup form. Then you can follow-up afterward to convince them to complete their purchase. Growing a List: Related Products Sometimes, consumers don\'t know what they don\'t know. They may have come to your site without knowing what they should be looking for, found something similar, but not exactly what they wanted. So, they give up and click to exit your site. Enter the Related Products Exit-Intent Popup Signup Form. Growing a List: Feedback The last of the exit-intent popup signup forms that we discuss is one for receiving feedback. If you ask a site visitor for feedback on their experience on your website, you may find out why they didn\'t decide to make a purchase. It will make your customers feel valued as well. Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice In addition to touch points and timing, the words you put on your signup form matter when it comes to growing your list. Part of that is the tone or personality that your words carry. That\'s what is called the \"voice\" of your copy.


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Man’s Best Friend’s Best Friend: Yo! Dog Walker’s Bob Morris

Man’s Best Friend’s Best Friend: Yo! Dog Walker’s Bob Morris

Beyond • August 17, 2018

Imagine coming home from a long day of work to find your dog excited to see you and well rested from a fun adventure with the dog walker … and the dishes piled up in your sink have been cleaned. Bob Morris, founder of Yo! Dog Walker doesn’t do that because he was asked. He does it because he cares and feels like it’s the right thing to do. Coming off a decade of touring around the country and across the globe with his band The Hush Sound, Morris found himself looking for a new adventure. What started as the realization that he could make some extra cash walking a neighbor’s dog along with his own has turned into a thriving business. He hired his friends that were also in and around the music industry to help them get some much-needed income in between gigs. Their creativity put to use in the fun updates they send their clients on walks or overnight stays. I don’t have kids yet, but I have a hard enough time leaving my dog even for a few days. The “pupdates” I receive brighten my day whether I’m out of town or just working a longer-than-usual day. You have to find the things about what you’re passionate about [within the business]. If you work hard and do the thing you don’t want to do for a little while, you can find people to do the parts of your business that are unappealing to you for the right price. 2:45 - Where the idea to start a dog walking business began 14:14 - On learning the business side of things 18:20 - Standing out in a crowded industry 25:50 - Understanding scalability and limits


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8/10/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

8/10/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

Beyond • August 10, 2018

Another week of our new podcast in the books! We continued our conversation focusing on growing your email list. This week, we took the focus from online to offline strategies. Sure, email marketing is in the digital realm, but your business doesn\'t exist there solely. Without further adieu, here are our next five episodes that discuss offline opportunities for growing your email list: Growing a List: Phone As we continue our conversation around growing a list, we take it offline for this episode and discuss using the phone to add subscribers. You\'ve already got potential subscribers on the phone, why not take a moment and ask them to join your list? Growing a List: In-Store We\'re still focusing on the various touch points for growing your list. We continue looking at off-line options by discussing opportunities to grow your list in-store. Growing a List: Events This episode continues our conversation on the off-line options for growing your email list with a look at events. Business events and expos give us an opportunity to interact with all sorts of current and potential customers. Use that to build your list. Growing a List: Print Ads t\'s important to remember every possible touch point when looking to grow your email list. You might not think of print ads as an opportunity to do that, but you\'d be incorrect. With QR codes, SMS or simply putting a URL, you can grow your list with this offline opportunity. Interns Ask Us Questions About Growing a List We made our interns listen to the first nine episodes on growing a list and then told them to ask us any questions that came up. After all, they\'re the resident Clueless Email Marketers in our office.


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Interns Ask Us Questions About Growing a List

Interns Ask Us Questions About Growing a List

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 8, 2018

We made our interns listen to the first nine episodes on growing a list and then told them to ask us any questions that came up. After all, they\'re the resident Clueless Email Marketers in our office. 00:22 Andy Shore: Hey, everybody, welcome back to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer. We have a special episode for you today. We have our interns here with Daniel and I, and since they are the clueless email marketers in our office, our resident clueless email marketers, we figured we\'d force them to listen to the first nine episodes and then see how Daniel and I did, if we covered anything, if it raised more questions with you guys, or if we\'re geniuses and our job is done, but we know we\'re not, so we expect you guys to have questions. You can say \"hi\" and introduce yourselves, if you guys like. 01:00 Zach Morita: Hey, how\'s it going? I\'m Zach, thanks for having me. [chuckle] 01:03 Milena Saradinova: And... Oh, my God. [laughter] Hi, I\'m Milena. 01:07 AS: Milena is nervous, and she\'ll be fine. [laughter] Daniel and I were more worried she is gonna ask us too hard of questions. 01:16 Daniel Miller: Yeah, we were very worried about that. [overlapping conversation] [laughter] 01:22 AS: So, how did we do? What\'d you guys think of the first nine episodes? 01:25 ZM: I thought they were pretty good, very informative. You guys really broke it up into easy to understand parts. 01:30 MS: Yeah. It was easy even for us to understand, how to build our lists if we were starting fresh. 01:38 AS: You guys don\'t have to say that, you\'ll get your college credits. [laughter] 01:43 DM: Was there something in there that you had no idea that existed and you\'re like, \"Oh, that\'s pretty cool. I had no idea I could do that\"? 01:52 ZM: I\'m not too sure about that, but I like the strategies that you guys talked about. I would have never thought of print ads or anything, \'cause these days everything is digital. 02:00 DM: Millennials. 02:02 ZM: Yeah, exactly, right? 02:04 AS: They\'re younger than millennials. We\'re the millennials. [overlapping conversation] [laughter] 02:11 DM: So, what\'s your first question? Hit us. 02:13 ZM: You guys talked about a lot of things that are happening in present time. Do you guys foresee any future trends happening under new technologies, or just new things you can do with emails, other things you can add to them? 02:25 DM: There was a certain... There was this app, I think it was called Bump. And what it was is... The whole thing of cards is kind of in the past. I have business cards, but I got a feeling when I give that to someone, they throw it away 10 seconds afterwards. The people that really care, they\'ll take a picture of it. There\'s an app, I think it was Bump. I think when the iPhone 3GS was out, or something like that, it allowed two people with the iPhone to bump them and it would automatically share their contact details. 02:54 AS: Yeah, I remember that. 02:55 DM: So, I\'m hoping for more of that to evolve in some way, for app developers and the phone companies to try to figure out a way to sync it, because only iPhone users could do that. If it was Android, there was a lot of conflict that would barely ever work. Technologies like QR code and apps like Bump, I\'m hoping for those to evolve more as business cards become more and more obsolete. 03:19 ZM: Yeah, it\'s crazy. 03:20 AS: Yeah, I don\'t know what I... Maybe something with voice, in terms of growing your list, \'cause voice search is continuing to grow and people are having to optimize their websites to have phrases like people would talk, that there might be something in the voice space, like an app to grow your list or something with how that integrates to make it easier though. I don\'t know how Siri understands me half the time, and she doesn\'t the other half. But I think that\'s a possibility, if I\'m just guessing. [laughter] 03:52 ZM: No, absolutely. I\'m like, I can\'t tell the future, but, yeah, that\'d be interesting to see. 03:56 DM: Milena, do you have any questions? 03:58 MS: You guys have a lot of good tips on how to grow your list, but let\'s say someone has tried them all and nothing really worked for them. What advice do you have for them, and... I don\'t know, if they\'re feeling discouraged about it, do you have any words of encouragement and what do you guys do? 04:15 AS: Shut down shop. [laughter] I think you have to look at yourself at that point and realize that, are you going after your core customer? Because if no one\'s signing up, no one\'s joining your list, you might not be going after the right customers, because what you\'re offering, they\'re not interested in, and you might not be offering either a good enough incentive or good enough content. It could be that your sign-up form doesn\'t tell them the amazing things they could get, or offer a free e-book or something or other for signing up, or once they get the newsletters, they don\'t like what they\'re getting, and so they\'re unsubscribing and your list isn\'t gonna grow. But I think there are very specific reasons that\'s happening. I don\'t think anyone who\'s doing the right things and the right strategies in the right places is gonna find that happen. But if you are, I think you really gotta look inward at that point. 05:06 DM: Yeah. I think what Andy is saying is absolutely right. It\'s really easy to bring people to your site, really, really easy. To bring the right people to your site is the complicated part. And just to give you a personal example with Benchmark Email, our traffic spiked, but signups didn\'t really go up. And we\'re curious, \"What the heck is going on?\" And when we looked at Google Analytics and we saw where this traffic was coming from, an FAQ that we had, which was how to export your contacts from Hotmail, was driving, I think it was like, 50% of all of our traffic overnight. It just started growing like crazy. When we looked into this, Hotmail had been sold to Microsoft and was shutting down Hotmail, and everyone was trying to look for how to export their contacts. So, our FAQ was rising like crazy \'cause it was a really well-explained, step-by-step process on how to do that, but, of course, none of these people will... Not none of them, but the majority were just looking to export their contacts. They weren\'t looking to sign up for the email software. 06:07 DM: So, our traffic spiked, but our number of signups didn\'t spike. If somebody is trying to grow their list, and they see that they tried all of these tips that we\'ve given and nothing\'s working, are they writing the right message? Like what you\'re saying, are they... On that signup form, is it informative enough to what they\'re signing up for? Could it be better explained? Could there be more of a history behind that? There\'s a ton of different things that I would look into to fix that. But, yeah, I think it would be more on the message getting across and connecting with the core customer than the strategy itself. 06:41 MS: So, what has worked best for you guys to finding your core customer and engaging with them? 06:47 DM: Oh, that\'s funny that you say that. It\'s actually... We tried doing... We were following this book called \"Inside Advantage\" to really try to identify who our core customer is. We got a lot of the company involved in really trying to figure this out, from our sales and support reps, all the way to the top to our CEO. And we had a core customer in mind, which we thought was a really good fit. And just recently, actually, we went back and we\'ve updated that a little bit slightly to adjust more to who are core customers. And, I\'m sorry, but what was the question again? [laughter] I was rambling off. 07:26 AS: What\'s worked for us to grow the list. 07:29 MS: And engage with the right customer, not just with any... As you were saying, not everyone is important... 07:34 DM: That\'s great. Okay, that it is. What\'s worked for us to grow our list specifically for core customers, really understanding who it is that uses our service, and understanding what they use of our service, meaning there\'s email marketers that are gonna go in, and unless you have a very powerful marketing automation tool, they\'re not even gonna take a look at your service. We noticed that we were getting a lot of people sending out simple newsletters, just keeping a constant communication with the subscribers on a regular basis, but nothing really too complicated. So, we made sure to adjust our language on our site to adapt to those people, meaning we would avoid, in a way, using the word \"automation,\" \'cause our core customer, they would be scared off by that word. But maybe later on after they\'ve been using our product for some time, we would then maybe introduce this as something new to them, and start very, very simple and say, \"Hey, try this welcome email strategy,\" and so forth. So, really the biggest thing, I think, that we\'ve done is change our language to really adapt to what our core customer is looking for. 08:39 AS: Yeah. And another thing I\'d say is that one thing that I found incredibly valuable in understanding our customers is getting out from behind a computer and talking to people face-to-face. If you\'re strictly in the e-commerce space or you\'re a SAS product, digital marketing, all that stuff, there\'s really no need, in theory, for you to ever talk to somebody face-to-face. It\'s all on the phone, email, chat, whatever that might be. But Daniel and I started going to events and working the booth for Benchmark and getting to talk to actual business owners and walking them through the process, and time and again having them say, \"Well, I don\'t need email marketing,\" but then being able to talk to them about their business and give them two, three different tips, things they could do with email marketing and see those moments where the light bulb turned on, there\'s really no replacing that. 09:27 AS: So, finding those opportunities to really look your customer in the eye and talk to them and get to know them and their needs and how they wanna use your tools, not how you want them to use your tools, that was huge for us. I\'m the copywriter for the company and I\'m running all our content, so it\'s made me better at that job in delivering more valuable, relevant content, just by talking to them face-to-face, and getting to understand that, I think that\'s helped grow our list as well. 09:56 MS: I guess the main takeaway from this is that know your customer and figure out the best language to really reach them, would be another tip to add. 10:05 AS: Totally. 10:06 DM: Exactly. Back in the day, let\'s just say 10 years ago, or 20, it was as easy as just creating an ad that showcases how you solve a problem. That\'s it. As long as you had a product that solved a problem, people would buy it. Now, there are so many competitors, and no matter what industry you\'re in, competitors come up overnight. People are really looking for products and services that speak their same language. I think there\'s over 100 email marketing platforms out there. Benchmark Email doesn\'t attract everybody. We attract somebody that when they come to our site, they went, \"Oh, this company gets me. They understand my problem. And not only that, they\'ve created tools and support to help me solve this problem in the way that I understand it.\" Versus, if they go to a competitor, they may say, \"Oh, this is too confusing,\" or, \"It\'s too fast for me,\" or, \"It\'s too slow,\" whatever that is. 11:00 ZM: Yeah. So, you guys try to keep it simple with your guys\' interface and everything, it seems to work out? 11:05 DM: Exactly, yeah. We tend to think that our core customer is a time shaft owner or manager, that really they\'re juggling a few things, their social media, their PPC ads, their landing pages, and email marketing is just one of those things. So, we know that time is super important. They don\'t have hours and hours to spend there, so we wanna make sure that our workflow and our process is as simple as it can be, so someone can go in and out in less than 15 minutes. 11:34 AS: Yeah, a few years ago, we made coffee mugs. The design was like a barometer, and as soon as you were two or three sips in from the coffee, you were done with your email and you can move on with your day and do everything else you had to do. It was just like, you don\'t need to worry about spending all your time here. We know that both marketers and business owners have to wear a lot of hats these days, even just the marketing space, every aspect of it, but some business owners don\'t get to be just marketing. They\'re marketing and sales and support, and everything else, so to be able to do it quickly and effectively is really important. 12:10 MS: You didn\'t go into... When you have your list, what do you do? How do you keep that engagement? How do you get people to open your emails? How do you get them engaged with your content, and let\'s say you\'re sending all these emails, but you don\'t get any response? 12:26 AS: Sure. It starts with the open rate. If they\'re not opening your emails, maybe your \"from name\" isn\'t familiar to them, maybe you\'re using a person in the company instead of your brand name, and they might not know it\'s you sending the emails, and that might be an issue, or your subject line isn\'t very good or not interesting or enticing enough to get them to open the email, or you didn\'t use the preview text that gets a little extra shot in there, trying to grab their attention and beam that teaser that gets the email opened. And then once it\'s opened, if they\'re not clicking through to your website, then it\'s a content issue. And it\'s just trying to pay attention to your reports and identify which level of the problem you\'re facing and working from the top down to improve each one to where the whole funnel is working. 13:14 DM: Yeah. And for this first section that we have for the Clues for the Clueless, we were really focusing on list building first. What you\'re talking about, list engagement, is gonna be part of our next series that we\'re gonna talk into how to build email properly to get the most opens, engagement rate, click-through rate. And revenue, as well, I think, is something that we\'ll definitely tap into. But I do agree with what Andy is saying. One thing to really keep in mind, separate... I\'m kinda getting ahead of our self now since we\'re gonna be covering this next week, but as a preview, as a snippet here for us, when you\'re looking at your email performance, people tend to do what Andy just said now. If you see a problem with your open rate, just play with the subject line and your \"from name\" and the preview name, let\'s say. That\'s technically true, but at the same time, similar to the traffic, it is very easy to get opens. If I say in my email \"$300 gift card to Amazon,\" I may get a lot of opens. But then if the content has nothing to do with that, I\'m really shooting myself in the foot, I\'m creating a bad taste in the mouth for my subscriber, and I\'m creating a sense of distrust. They\'re not gonna trust me anymore. 14:26 DM: So what\'s important is look at those step-by-step, the open, the click, on the email, how long they stay on the email, did they click to get to your site, to get an overall sense, but always keep in mind what is the message that you\'re trying to send. Maybe the open rate that you have for the message you\'re sending is through the roof, because not all of your subscribers are technically interested in that. And instead of trying to say, \"My strategy sucks,\" maybe try to go back and say, \"How can I further segment this to make the messages more relevant to each of the buckets or each of the type of people that I may have on my list?\" Again, we\'ll get into that in the next series. 15:01 AS: Just to add to what Daniel was saying about opens are easy to get, you\'ll also have the neurotic subscribers like me who are just like can\'t handle having push notifications on their phones, so I\'ll open and X out of an email immediately just so it\'s not... The push notification isn\'t there anymore. And so that open has no value either. But I wanna ask you guys a couple of questions, as long as you\'re here. I thought about doing it before, but we\'re not throwing you any curve balls. It\'s about growing your list. What are some newsletters or email lists you guys subscribed for recently or have you ever subscribed for an email list? 15:38 ZM: Me, personally, I do. Sometimes when I shop, like clothing companies, or something, something that catches my eyes, like \"20% off now,\" or things like that, something that\'s in it for me. 15:48 MS: I do like those retail ones too, like when you sign up for their newsletter, you get some percentage off of your next purchase or something like that. And I also am interested in marketing, so I do subscribe to the Ad Age newsletter, and I really like it. They give you the quick updates for this week, and I really like that. I\'ve subscribed to a lot of emails and newsletters, and I\'m really upset about it. I get at least 50 emails a day, and I hated it. That\'s why when I think about email marketing, I\'m like, \"How do you even stand out? I don\'t open most of these.\" I get 50 of those every day. So, it\'s not even about... Even if you\'re subject line is cool, I\'m not going to open it just because I get so many. So, when you guys were talking about how sure you are about the future of email marketing, I was thinking, how can you guys be so sure when our future generation gets so many emails a day and doesn\'t even open one of them? 16:46 AS: Sure. We actually had the Heart of Business a month or two ago, interviewed Chad White, who wrote the Email Marketing Rules, and we asked him a similar question, \"Are email marketers shooting themselves in the foot by sending too many emails? Are people fatigued by crowded inboxes.\" And he pointed out to us readily so, and you even say it yourself, you\'re in marketing and so you subscribe to newsletters and now you get a lot, but that isn\'t necessarily the average user. And people who maybe do a little bit of online shopping, but not all of it... And even if they are un-subscribing, people are used to the noise in the inbox, and Gmail has the tabs and everything to sort it that I don\'t think people are tuned out to this point and, the stats don\'t necessarily show it in terms of what the open rates are, that I think the general average consumer will still be opening emails and being able to interact with that. 17:43 DM: Yeah. No, I agree with that. And that enforces more what I was saying earlier about really focusing not on all of your subscribers, because I think that\'s really something that, in a way, is unrealistic, but really focus on who your core customer is. And inside of that, there\'s another shell inside of that, which is, who\'s ready to buy now or who\'s ready to engage right now. I subscribe to LivingSocial, and all those type of things. They send me an email daily, sometimes two or even three times per day, depending on the season. I don\'t open or buy from every single one of them, but I\'ll tell you what, if I have some PTO that I wanna take off and there\'s an email that pops up at the right time with a trip to Yosemite at 300 bucks for a whole week, I\'m taking that. And if you think about that purchase of $300, that almost pays for the email marketing, for me specifically, for them to send it to me for years to come. So, that\'s how that balances out, I see. 18:41 AS: Yeah. Every podcast, audience won\'t be treated to the skeptical look we got from Milena, that response. 18:46 MS: I\'m just curious, because... [laughter] 18:48 DM: If we can convince her, email marketing has the feature. 18:52 MS: I mean, you guys are just so sure about it. And you even talk about how maybe Facebook will become... Will be gone in a couple of years or something like that, but you sound so sure that email marketing is here to stay. But maybe in the past, people thought that mailing things to people, like flyers and stuff like that, was going to stay with us forever. And it still is happening, but what is the return on investment on that now? I have so much junk mail at home that I don\'t even go through right now. So, do you guys fear that one day email marketing will become obsolete? 19:28 AS: I don\'t know. The answer is no, but I\'m gonna steal Daniel\'s answers with all of this and what I respond to, but communication, in some form, is always gonna be there. Like Daniel said millions of times, there was writing on the walls and caves thousands of years ago, and that\'s how they communicated with people. \"Here\'s what I ate for lunch today,\" painted on the wall of a cave instead of on your Instagram. And so that communication is there, in some form or another. Even if it\'s not email marketing, the ideas of how you communicate with people and engage with your audience to sell to them and to solve problems for them and provide them with value is gonna be there, even if it\'s not email marketing, per se. And I think the company and the space will evolve with that in the natural way and in ways that it\'s not something I worry about because, like you said, junk mail, it\'s still communicating to your audience. It\'s just [20:25] ____ do it might change, but even all the new ones, social media, all that ties back into email. You can\'t sign up for it without an email address, you get notifications in your email. It\'s all still pretty email-based. 20:38 DM: When it comes down to email marketing, I think when it comes down to the channels, how many channels I use to communicate with friends, family, co-workers. To name a few, Slack, WhatsApp, Facebook, Facebook Messenger, \'cause I\'m talking about the Facebook wall versus Facebook Messenger, Instagram, Instagram direct messages, Twitter, Twitter direct messages, LinkedIn, LinkedIn, and these are people... 21:00 AS: Snapchat. 21:00 DM: Snapchat, Face2Face, and these are people that I can just choose one channel and communicate on it. But depending on the type of message, I wanna send it through a different channel. Right? If I wanna do a goofy face for a situation, I may use Snapchat. If it\'s more serious, I don\'t know, type of communication, I may use a different form that... If it\'s more personal, I may do something like WhatsApp or regular text messaging. Again, depending on the channel of communication... I\'m sorry. Depending on what I wanna say, I\'m gonna choose that channel. 21:31 DM: And one thing that I wanna be very clear, I don\'t think anybody should just do email marketing. If you\'re just doing email marketing, you\'re losing out. That\'s just the bottom line. Same thing as if you\'re just doing Facebook, you\'re probably losing out as well, because not everybody likes to receive communications through the same channel. Just how I like to send a message based on what the message is for a specific channel, people also like to receive specific things through certain channels as well. If I send the exact same email on Facebook versus their email, it\'s gonna get a totally different response. I think that\'s why every brand needs to identify what does email mean to them, what is the voice and the type of message that they wanna send through that channel, and how does that correlate with all of the other channels and messages that they\'re sending out? Don\'t duplicate it, don\'t overlap it too much, but you want that consistency surrounding of your subscriber and fans. 22:26 AS: Yeah. Do you have any more hard-hitting questions? [overlapping conversation] 22:29 AS: I\'m not giving you any more opportunity to ask questions. [chuckle] Thanks, everyone, for listening to this very special episode of Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer. And we\'ll catch you next time. Bye, guys. You guys wanna say goodbye to our audience? 22:43 MS: Bye. 22:43 ZM: Yeah. Bye. [laughter] 22:45 DM: So enthusiastic. They\'re so happy to be here. Thanks, everybody. 22:50 MS: But it was fun.


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