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Know Your Subscribers: Segmentation

Know Your Subscribers: Segmentation

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 29, 2018

Part of getting to know your subscribers is not treating them all as if they\'re the same person. That\'s where segmentation comes into play. Discover the ways you can sort your subscribers into groups that will let you send targeted, relevant content to each segment. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re gonna continue our conversation talking about knowing your subscribers and the way you do that is with segmentation. We danced around saying it in the last episode, \'cause we knew we have a whole lot of segmentation coming up, but we\'re talking about all the different ways you can do it, but this episode is gonna be what it even is. So what is segmentation, Daniel? 00:44 Daniel Miller: So, when it comes to the segmentation, I\'m sure we all have the signup form on our site. Everybody starts filling that out, but the question is, does everybody really... It\'s not a one-size-fits-all. So by segmenting your list of subscribers or customers, you can really start to kinda build a personalized experience for that type of person. What I mean by that is you can segment your subscribers based on interests, maybe based on their demographic, you can also maybe segment your subscribers based on previous purchase history or activity on your emails and site. There\'s a million different ways that you can segment your list, but the bottom line is the reason why you wanna segment is so you\'re as relevant as you possibly can be with each of your subscribers. 01:31 AS: Absolutely, and it really doesn\'t even matter what you\'re selling. And we mentioned this before, you probably have a wide array of products or services that you\'re offering and each customer is gonna be a little bit different. You don\'t sell to 100 clones of the same person, or more. It\'s different based on each different group and segment that you create and the thing you need to do, as an email marketer, to not seem clueless when you\'re sending out those emails, is to understand what those differences are and get to know those people. And like we mentioned in the last episode, those are real humans on the other side of those email addresses. And you need to start to understand things about those people. Daniel mentioned creating the persona of your subscribers. Download a picture, put it on the wall, look at that and write to that kind of group of person but take it even deeper. I mean, think about what does this person drive? What kind of food do they like to eat? Where do they shop for clothes? Any of those things... What blogs do they read? Any of those things are gonna help you understand that segment of your list and get to know how you can do your email marketing to that segment even better. 02:42 DM: Absolutely, and I say this all the time. I mean, any product or service, there\'s a million competitors out there. It\'s a rare case in this day and age that there\'s one company doing one specific thing. And because of that, a lot of people, because they have so many choices, they\'re gonna wanna choose the company that they feel that speaks to them, whether that\'s based on the design, based on the values, whatever that is, they\'re really gonna start to split hairs in that kind of way. So again, the more you can adapt to that and the more relevant you can be by segmenting your list, can be very helpful. And that\'s at the top of the funnel level. Once they\'re actually engaging with you, segmenting takes a whole new level of engagement to really make sure that when your subscribers subscribes to your emails, they\'re not just getting a generic email that everyone else is getting, you\'re providing a custom experience for them that adds value to the experience with you, so. 03:38 AS: Absolutely. And just to continue on ways in which you can understand each segment of your list, think about it in a way of, \"What problem am I solving for this group of people?\" Because based on what you have, you\'re a toy company maybe it\'s, \"Hey, I like that these toys are educational,\" Or some parents are like, \"I just need them to not bother me for a little while,\" or whatever that is. It\'s you\'re solving different problems and you can speak to them in that way, in that segment, to make sure you\'re doing great relevant email marketing. So what would an example of this be, Daniel? 04:10 DM: An example of something for a specific problem... Well, here\'s an example. Okay, and this is based on maybe a buying behavior, right. Let\'s say that I own a pool store and somebody comes in and they buy a bag of chlorine for their pool. And I know that that bag of chlorine is gonna last about six months, right? I may not wanna put that person in the same stream of emails of all my other people that are getting different promotions. I may wanna create a specific segment for that person, that relates to people that have bought pool products related to chlorine and I know that that chlorine bag lasts about six months, in five-and-a-half months an email may shoot out to that person, with maybe a discount or a special promotion for their next bag of chlorine. The bottom line of what you\'re trying to do there is you\'re trying to relate to their experience and you\'re trying to engage with them in such a level that they know that you understand exactly their needs so they\'re gonna come back to shop with you in the future. 05:09 AS: Definitely. Another example is say you\'re a pet shop. There\'s cat people and there\'s dog people. And sure, there\'s some people at the center of that Venn diagram that spend their days watching YouTube videos of different types of animals being friends that you wouldn\'t expect and they might love both cat and dog information, but overall, if you\'re a cat person, you don\'t care about the new dog toys or dog food or dog treats, or leashes, just as dog owners don\'t care about the scratch pads or catnip or whatever else cat people like. I\'m a dog person, so I don\'t... That\'s the end of my cat interest list. But if you\'re sending the right, relevant information to those, that\'s how you\'re gonna make sales and that\'s why we\'re an email marketer insurance to create relationships with your customers, and that\'s how you\'re gonna do it, by making them feel heard and seen in your email marketing. 06:00 DM: Yeah, exactly. 06:01 AS: All right, we\'ll catch you guys next time as we continue this conversation and start to talk about the different types of segmentation that you could be doing.    


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Know Your Subscribers: Why is That Important?

Know Your Subscribers: Why is That Important?

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 28, 2018

  The second goal for any email marketer should be to get to know their subscribers. It\'s important to know, so you can ensure you\'re delivering relevant content of value to those subscribers. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back to Clues For The Clueless email marketer everybody, we\'re gonna continue on with our conversation today. We ended our section on growing your list, so now that you, hopefully, have been growing that list, it\'s time to turn your attention to getting to know those new subscribers, and that\'s what this whole next section of the podcast is gonna be about and what we\'ll be focusing on. And what we\'re gonna start with today is simply talking about why that\'s even important. 00:50 Daniel Miller: Absolutely. And one of the things that has changed quite a bit in the past five years is when I would tell somebody that I am in the email marketing industry, immediately they would think \"Oh, you\'re a spammer.\" And I think that in the past five years that\'s definitely changed and people are really seeing the value that email marketing adds to it, and I think people are more open to providing their email to download a PDF, to get updates from a service or product. And I think a lot of that has to do because a lot of brands are acknowledging who their audience is and they\'re adapting to that. Meaning, it\'s no longer just a numbers game, it\'s a quality game and that\'s why it\'s really, really important to know your audience, to provide quality to them. 01:28 AS: Yeah, it\'s really about being relevant. No one wants to feel like they\'re being marketed to, but if you\'re able to connect with them and send them something that\'s important to them, of interest to them and that they want to open, that\'s what makes people look forward to your emails, rather than just deleting them as soon as they get them to get out of having that push notification, like I do to so many emails I receive. 01:52 DM: Exactly. If you signed up to benchmark email, you\'re probably expecting tips on email marketing. If we start sending you cat videos and dog videos, we would probably go viral, but that\'s not really adding value to your experience with benchmark email. And I think the more companies understand what it is that their customers or potential customers are looking for, the more engagement they\'ll receive, and, of course, the more growth they\'ll also see as well. 02:14 AS: Absolutely. And it\'s just important to note that everybody doesn\'t like the same thing. You can\'t please all the people all the time. There\'s varied interest within all the things you offer and that\'s gonna come into play with your email marketing. 02:28 DM: Yeah. More and more, we see today... I mean go to a job fair and you\'ll see that there\'s a common theme of people telling you, \"Hey, be as specific as you possibly can.\" If you\'re gonna get into, again, let\'s take it to consulting now. If you\'re gonna get into consulting, don\'t just be a business consultant, maybe be a business consultant for the food industry or maybe even be business consultant for food industry for fast food or for healthy food or for something like that. The more specific you can be, the better it\'s gonna be because when people go to search online, they do specific searches. So, again, the more relevant you are, the better that\'s gonna be and that has a lot to do with your email marketing as well. 03:10 AS: Definitely. And it\'s important to remember that the more subscribers you have, if you took the tips in that last section and you\'re crushing it with growing your list, it makes it harder to keep that list happy. And so, that\'s why taking the time to getting to know them... And we\'re gonna focus with this next section on how you can do that, how you can break everyone up and what it all gets down to in terms of what\'s gonna make you an effective email marketer and a less clueless one is just that ability to understand them and remembering that each email address has a person behind it. 03:46 DM: Yeah. One thing that in a way has helped us is to really outline who that person is, and if you can even imagine them, print out a picture... Wherever it is that you work, try to print out a picture of who it is that you\'re talking to and let it up there. And as you\'re typing out that email, look up at that picture, I\'ll guarantee that email is gonna be slightly different. And what I mean by that is it\'s gonna be properly written in focus for that specific person, you are writing to the person on the other side of that email address. 04:15 AS: Yeah, it\'ll feel like it has a more personal touch, even though it\'s a group of your entire list that you\'re sending to, it\'ll feel personalized for those people, and that\'s really important. I will catch you next time as we continue our conversation talking about the importance of knowing your subscribers, thanks for listening.


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Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: CTA

Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: CTA

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 27, 2018

This is the last episode in our conversation on growing your list. We move onto the next topic after this one. Last, and certainly not least, for growing your list is the Call To Action. You need to create a sense of urgency, use action words and more to ensure you\'ve gained a new subscriber. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back. Today, we\'re gonna wrap up our conversation for now on growing your email list, and that focus that we\'ve been on the last couple on writing compelling copy as a way to grow your list on those sign-up forms. And what we\'re gonna talk about today is a call to action. 00:39 Daniel Miller: Yeah, so the call to action on a sign-up form is, of course, the button that they have to click on to finally submit that form. And as I say submit, I wanna tell you, humans are not computers. When you say submit, eh, they may not register with that right away. Something like sign up, yes, I want this, something like that, that may have you stand out from the rest of the competitors that are out there. So those are just a few examples before we really dig into CTA\'s calls to action. 01:07 AS: Yeah, that\'s a good point. I think the default is submit, but that sounds like you\'re trying to get someone to bend to your will, [chuckle] or even like a join us, that could get a little culty. Yeah, I\'m thinking about how someone\'s gonna do that, and what\'s gonna make them want to do it. If you can do it in a way like, One of my favorite bands, when you go to their website and their sign-up form pops up, the two options are, \"Yes, I want more face-melting rock and roll,\" or \"No, I like my face where it currently is.\" Which are funny, it makes sense for the brand, but they do it in a way where it\'s like, yeah, I want face-melting rock and roll. If you can make that call to action and get someone excited about for what clicking that button means, that\'s what an effective call to action is. 01:58 DM: Again, what you just described right there, I think that is the perfect example of... When I picture somebody that\'s rock and roll, they\'re looking for face-melting rock and roll, right? If you just say yeah, sign me up, yeah, they\'ll probably get subscribers, but the face-melting rock and roll, you\'re speaking to your audience. And I think that\'s the biggest thing that you wanna do there, remember who you\'re speaking to and talk to them like they wanna be spoken to. I was just looking up on a site... Oh my goodness, I just lost it. But yeah, very similar to what Andy\'s saying. Don\'t just go with the default ones, try to figure out what is it... Put your buyer persona in your mind and talk to them at every point of contact on your website, and most importantly when they\'re filling out a form and about to submit it. 02:41 AS: Yeah. And the most beautiful design work you put into that web page into the sign-up form, it could look amazing. If it doesn\'t also have a compelling call to action, that CTA isn\'t there, all the work you did is for nothing. The design doesn\'t matter if the call to action isn\'t there to back it up. 03:01 DM: Yeah exactly. And I\'m trying to think what else we can really say about calls to action. One thing that I really like in case to action from other websites... And this is becoming more of a norm because of the security factors out there. For example, if you\'re with trustee, I believe that by default you have to have your terms of use next to any form that somebody is filling out, meaning next to the call to action. But that\'s also a very valuable piece of real estate, for you to say something like, \"We will not sell or share your information.\" Think of what fear your customer may have. Maybe it\'s, \"We promise we\'ll only send to you once per month.\" Whatever that is, that\'s also a really good opportunity right next to the call to action that\'s kind of supportive to what they\'re about to submit. So it\'s not necessarily the call to action, but it helps support somebody to feel confident to click on the call to action. 03:57 AS: Definitely. And just some other aspects of the call to action to consider is, make it action-oriented, so they feel like they need to act on it, like, \"Sign up today. Join us now.\" It\'s that sense of urgency that\'s gonna make them want to take action that\'s important. Make it big and clear. That font should be easy to read, you can\'t miss it. If you got a big blue button and tiny little white text in the middle of it, it\'s gonna look weird, one, but they\'re not gonna be able to easily read it. Think about those old people remotes that are giant with the giant numbers, that\'s really how the text needs to look on that call to action because, well, our CMO will probably laugh when she listens to this episode, but oftentimes in our meeting, we get a request from her to zoom in one more on a doc that we\'re all looking at on the projector, those things. And she loves to remind us that as we age we\'re gonna be in that camp, too, so it\'s important to remember that that anyone at any range is using the internet nowadays, so make that call to action easy-to-read. 05:01 AS: And last not least, test. We keep talking about testing. This is another opportunity. Even something that seems so small to you, to what you\'re call to action button on the sign-up form says can make huge differences. If you have great automations that trigger once someone signs up through a sign-up form and you\'re converting crazy amounts of sales in that automation, something as small as upping the percentage of people on your page that sign up on that sign-up form can mean huge dollars and cents for your business. So test out what that copy is, what you\'re writing, to make a compelling call to action to sign up to your email list, because it\'s gonna pay off for you in the end. 05:44 DM: Yeah. And not just the copy on the call to action as well, but the visual of it, make sure that it stands out. If you have a white background, don\'t do a transparent call to action with just a border. Don\'t forget, this is kind of more of getting into a discussion with your design team and marketing team. The marketing team wants the action to happen, the design team wants it to look good. Find that middle balance there, but make sure that the call to action stands out so your subscribers don\'t miss it. 06:13 AS: Definitely. And this concludes our whole section on growing your list. I\'m sure we\'ll revisit at some point in the hopefully very long history of this podcast, but for now we\'re gonna move on to the next topic, which is now that you\'ve put in all the work to grow your list, let\'s start to understand your subscribers and get to know who they are. And so we\'re gonna launch an entire conversation about that in the next several episodes. Thanks for sticking to us about this section, and we\'ll catch you next time.


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Best Welcome Email Subject Lines to Greet Your New Subscribers

Best Welcome Email Subject Lines to Greet Your New Subscribers

Beyond • August 27, 2018

The first email that you send to your new subscribers can work wonders for your relationship with them (first impressions are the most lasting, remember?). The fact that you have them on board doesn’t mean they’re ready to open and click on future emails, let alone trust you with their needs. In fact, they can use that first email to see if your business is reliable and trustworthy. So, capitalizing on this opportunity is crucial to set a foundation for a strong, long-term relationship with them. To help you roll the right digital welcome mat and increase the effectiveness of your email marketing, I’ve prepared a guide with the best welcome email subject lines that get clicks. Welcome Email Statistics To help you get a better understanding of why it’s so important to get your welcome email right, let’s quickly explore the experiences of other businesses through statistics: Welcome emails have 4x open rate and 5x click-through rate than other email marketing Welcome emails are the most effective email types for e-commerce brands So, as you can see, welcome emails are pretty special. And, as a marketer or a business owner, you know that a higher open rate and click-through rate equals more customers and traffic on your website. According to Asperian report on email marketing, 93 percent of email marketers use welcome emails at least monthly. Moreover, the report claims that welcome emails outperform regular promotional emails in terms of transaction rate and revenue per email as well. Subject lines in welcome emails are a big part of their success. It’s the first thing that the customer sees when the message arrives in their inbox, so it determines the outcome of the email even before the content is viewed. Besides, a lot of your customers expect you to send them a welcoming email! In fact, one report suggested that up to 74 percent of new subscribers expect to receive them as soon as they sign up. So, one thing is clear: you need welcome emails to improve your email marketing effort. Since subject lines are critical for the success, let’s see how you can master them to maximize the open rate of your emails. Welcome Email Subject Lines and Why They’re Good 1. Offer a Friendship The following email example comes from Holland & Barrett, a UK-based health retailer. The subject line in their welcome emails reads: “Welcome to Holland & Barett… Let’s get to know each other…” As you can see, they also used a bit of humor in the email to reinforce the message that the brand is looking to establish a friendly relationship. 2. Offer an Incentive Right Away The next example comes from Highway Robbery, a company that sells colorful robes. As you can see, the subject line they choose to go with was “Welcome to the Robbery (discount inside).” This choice clearly seeks to incentivize the viewer to open the email and see what kind of discount they can get (by the way, it’s 10 percent off the first order, which is pretty good for just signing up). So the takeaway here is that you can try to offer an incentive to your new subscribers to persuade them to open the welcome email. This also works for making the brand look generous. Another reason why this email is good because it stimulates to make a purchase in a non-promotional, sweet way. That’s good, because subject lines that sound too pushy and promotional will be deleted right away. 3. Represent Your Brand Clearly The style of communication with your customers matters, so you need to make sure that your own style matches the image of your brand. If you’ve established a certain style of communication, stick to it in your email marketing to avoid confusing your customers and making it easy to memorize your brand. A great example of representing a brand through communication style comes from KFC. The subject line of their welcome email reads: “Howdy, folks!” This phrase is a typical one used by the brand to refer to its customers. In fact, here’s KFC using the same greeting on its official account on Twitter. This works for well-known brands best, but can also be used for businesses trying to promote some slogans to help customer memorize them. 4. Show Immediate Value for Customers The following example of a great welcome email comes from HelloFresh, a UK-based company specializing in delivering fresh dishes to customers. Their site has an exciting tool called Flavor Generator which does exactly what its name says: generates recipes from different cuisines, including Indian, Italian, British, and others. Those who played the flavor generator for the first time are greeted with a welcome email like the one below. The recipient specified that they liked British food, so the email is all about that. It contains lots of free recipes of British food, which could be used by the recipient right away. This is a great example of a business showing an immediate value to the customer, in a really cool way. The subject line is good because it: Thanks the recipient for taking the time to play the flavor generator Provides an immediate value by providing recipes of the cuisine that the recipient is interested in 5. Praise the New Subscribers for Their Decision Many brands praise their customers and endorse their choice for subscribing to their newsletters. For example, a well-known fashion brand Rue La La sends out welcome emails with a subject line that reads: “This was a good decision.” The email immediately explains why the decision was good. For example, it says that the website has offers from best-selling brands at “jaw-dropping prices,” international shipping from USD 9.95, and multiple checkout options. And, of course, the email calls the recipient a “stylish friend,” which is also a way to connect with them on a personal level. 6. Tell Them Who You Are and Engage from Day One Check out the welcome email below. It was delivered with a subject line “You’re In. Welcome to Adidas.” It combines two powerful welcome email techniques: telling the subscribers about the essence of the brand and encouraging them to take action right away. The subject line emphasizes that Adidas is an authoritative brand and the phrase “You’re in” certainly seeks to make the recipient feel special and a part of a big family of sports lovers. As you can see, the content in the email supports the idea of the subject line. Adidas wants the recipient to think of the experience with the brand as a journey. The company is also encouraging the recipient to make the first purchase by providing a unique promo code to claim a 15 percent off. Some of the options for the first purchase are also provided to encourage the recipient some more. 7. Thank Your Subscribers A simple “thank you” is a powerful way to add a human quality to your email and begin building brand loyalty. Using this phrase in a welcome emails means that you want to show your new subscribers that you appreciate them. In the future, when a subscriber is ready to make a purchase, they will remember that you made them feel good from the very beginning of the relationship. Here’s an example of a welcome email along with the subject line that a Polish fashion brand Reserved uses to greet its new subscribers. Notice the address of the recipient: it says “Friend!” Reserved also provides a discount as another “thank you” for signing up. That’s also recommended to begin building brand loyalty and a positive relationship. 8. Use Emojis with Care! Emojis are fun, but you should use them carefully to increase the open rate and greet your new subscribers in the right way. Recipients can misunderstand the subject lines written without emojis because of the lack of non-verbal elements. It’s recommended to use emojis only when you’re including emotional words to make the subject line sound like a subject of an email from a friend. Let’s Recap the Best Practices Make it easy to understand. As you can see, all the words in subject lines in emails above are simple, one or two syllable words. In other words, they use simple, natural language and avoid complex words because it’s difficult to memorize them. Always focus on the needs of the recipients. The recipient is the center of the universe for you in this case, so you have to consider their needs if your target audience in the design of your welcome email subject line. For example, if English is not the native language of your recipients, find a translation agencies list to make sure that your message is understood. Keep it short. The average length of the subject lines in all examples of welcome emails in this article is 6.5 words. It ensures that a recipient can read the line quickly. Avoid ambiguity. Be specific and clear in your subject line because you don’t have all time in the world to attract the attention of the recipient. The Next Step As you can see, there are many different techniques to greet your new subscribers. If you’re not sure whether one option is hitting the right chord, feel free to test another one. In fact, create three different versions of welcome email subject lines and see what one performs best. And don’t forget to tell us about it in the comments below!


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Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Incentive

Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Incentive

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 24, 2018

Another important aspect of the words you use for your signup form is the incentive. Potential subscribers need to understand the value in opting into your list. Tell them what they have to look forward to! 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re gonna continue talking about writing compelling copy as a way to grow your list on those sign-up forms, and the aspects of it we\'re gonna focus on this time is the incentive. Daniel kinda alluded to it last time, but it\'s making sure that you\'re making a convincing argument for signing up for your sign-up form. 00:41 Daniel Miller: Exactly. So we are overlapping in a lot of these episodes here, but the reason why we\'re doing that is because we\'re talking a lot about the similar things, but we\'re giving a slightly different perspective and trying to give you different ideas as to what your customer may be going through or what you may be going through. So when it comes to the right incentive, I can\'t say this enough, but it\'s adding value. And, again, if that is the little bit of push that they need to finalize that purchase or it\'s the little bit of push that they may need to earn... I\'m sorry, for you to earn trust, whatever that is, what is the value that you\'re giving your subscriber in exchange of the email address? We\'ve talked about if you have a restaurant, if you have a retail store, sometimes the discount, the coupon, the buy one get one free kinda deal, those help a lot to give that last push to get them back into your door. If you are a service, you may need to earn a little bit more trust. So whatever that is, I think it\'s important for every company to do their own testing and to figure out, \"Okay, people that tend to come to the pricing page, they think it\'s too expensive. So how can we have a pop-up form that\'s an exit intent, whatever that is, that addresses that problem that the visitor has?\" 01:51 AS: Yeah. Like we\'ve talked about before, it\'s easing any of those frictions, anxieties, whatever a potential customer might have, and erasing those for them. So if you\'re explaining the incentive of drawing that list, it\'s the same thing of erasing any \"Oh, I don\'t wanna hear or get emails every day or twice a day,\" or whatever that is, it\'s the incentive of, \"Hey, we\'re not gonna bug you more than once a month or once a week,\" or whatever that is. 02:18 DM: And stick to that. I\'ve had companies before that say, \"We will bug you but once a month,\" then before I know it, they\'ve added me to six other lists, and it\'s... Yeah, that\'s not fun. That gives me a bad taste in mouth. 02:27 AS: Exactly. So what you just wanna do is let them know that there\'s a benefit for that action of subscribing. It\'s gonna pay off to them, and then tell them why and what that is, and what they\'re gonna benefit from. And as we mentioned before, make sure it\'s something that makes sense, and like we said, don\'t just... Not a free iPad or a free Apple Watch, or whatever that is, because that\'s gonna be everybody, but it\'s gonna be something that is of value to the type of customers you\'re trying to attract. And just telling them why they should care to sign up for what you\'ve got. 03:00 DM: Exactly. To give you a good example... And by the way, I wanna go back and I wanna say something \'cause we have been talking a lot about coupons and discounts. Something to mention as well, it\'s not always about discounting your product, that incentive may also be, \"Hey, let us show you the value here.\" It\'s not just about providing a discount, \'cause if you set a price, I\'m sure there\'s a good reason as to why you put that price there, and I\'m sure you have staff and servers or a brick and mortar store that you need to pay for. So not always discounts is a good idea, but also that incentive can be flipped to say, \"Hey, if you\'re not convinced about the value here, boy, do we have some case studies to show you, do we have examples, do we... \" Schedule a one-on-one demo, whatever that could be, add the incentive to show the value. 03:46 AS: Exactly, and I\'m gonna run down just the steps you should take in writing this copy, in explaining your incentive, how to do that. So tell them why they should care, make it loud and clear, don\'t hide the value in there, it should be on the forefront. Explain to them exactly how they\'re gonna benefit from it, whether it\'s get a demo and answer all your questions, or this webinar that\'s gonna teach you this, this PDF that\'s gonna help you do this. Make it very obvious to them why they need to give you your email address. And don\'t be vague about it, don\'t keep them guessing. You\'re gonna kinda hit them over the head with the value, and that\'s the way you\'re gonna get them to subscribe. 04:27 DM: Yep. 04:27 AS: Alright, thanks everyone for listening. We\'ve got one more episode where we\'re gonna talk about writing compelling copy to grow the list, and that\'s gonna conclude this section, for now, on focusing on growing your email list. It\'ll be our first 21 episodes, which is exciting, we\'re off to a great start. We appreciate all of you for listening, and we\'ll catch you next time.


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8/24/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

8/24/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

Beyond • August 24, 2018

Hey everybody! Sorry I missed last week\'s digest. To be fair, it was in the name of love. We kept the episodes rolling every weekday, while I was in Chicago for a couple of weddings. The good news is, my best man speech went well ... and we\'re back with the blog digest of our most recent episodes of the Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer podcast (my employers may question the order I placed those in). Growing a List: Location Location! Location! Location! We talked about the importance of timing last episode, but one factor in that timing is where on the page a signup form is located. Do you want your form above-the-fold, in the sidebar or the footer? Listen to find out. Growing a List: Popup vs. Standard Embed Signup Forms In this episode, we talk about the times you\'ll want to use a popup signup form or a standard embeddable one. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. Learn when to employ each of them to grow your list. Growing a List: Exit-Intent Signup Forms If a visitor leaves your website without subscribing to your list, they may be gone for good. Don\'t let that happen! Catch them on their way out the door with an exit-intent signup form. Learn how in this episode. Growing a List: Freebies, Discounts & Special Offers Last episode we talked about the exit-intent signup form. There are a few different approaches you can take with that strategy. This episode discusses using them to offer freebies, discounts and special offers. Growing a List: Shopping Cart We continue talking about the different types of exit-intent pop-up forms by discussing the shopping cart. If someone places an item in your eCommerce shopping cart but doesn\'t make a purchase, you can catch them on the way out with a popup signup form. Then you can follow-up afterward to convince them to complete their purchase. Growing a List: Related Products Sometimes, consumers don\'t know what they don\'t know. They may have come to your site without knowing what they should be looking for, found something similar, but not exactly what they wanted. So, they give up and click to exit your site. Enter the Related Products Exit-Intent Popup Signup Form. Growing a List: Feedback The last of the exit-intent popup signup forms that we discuss is one for receiving feedback. If you ask a site visitor for feedback on their experience on your website, you may find out why they didn\'t decide to make a purchase. It will make your customers feel valued as well. Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice In addition to touch points and timing, the words you put on your signup form matter when it comes to growing your list. Part of that is the tone or personality that your words carry. That\'s what is called the \"voice\" of your copy.


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Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice

Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 23, 2018

In addition to touch points and timing, the words you put on your signup form matter when it comes to growing your list. Part of that is the tone or personality that your words carry. That\'s what is called the \"voice\" of your copy. 00:21 Andy Shore: Welcome back, everybody. We\'re continuing our conversation about the focus on growing your email list. And for this next few episodes, we\'re gonna talk about what goes into writing a good sign-up form. And the reason that writing is an important aspect of a sign-up form, we talked about all the touchpoints, we talked about the timing, writing is kind of the third aspect to that because that\'s how they\'re interacting with your sign-up forms. They\'re gonna read what it says right there on there, you need to know how to do that well in order to make sure that... You can do timing right, you can do the touchpoints right, but if that last point isn\'t there, they might fall out before finishing that subscription. 01:02 Daniel Miller: Exactly. And what we\'ve been talking about earlier in the previous episodes, add value, that\'s the most important thing. Make sure the potential subscriber, I\'m not gonna call them a subscriber yet, the potential subscriber knows what the value is that they\'re getting in exchange of their email. If you just say, \"Sign up,\" what am I signing up for? Is this offers? Is this newsletters? Is this daily? Is it weekly? Is it monthly? Those are the type of questions that your subscriber is gonna have in their mind. Try to answer those. 01:31 AS: Yeah, and it\'s important to remember you\'re not just talking one-on-one, this is a sign-up form that anyone who comes to your website is gonna see. So whereas you\'re gonna be segmenting that list later on and get to have a little more individualized, personalized content, this needs to run the gamut for every type of visitor that\'s gonna get to your website. And as we talked about with the different touchpoints there, there\'s different sign-up forms, but each individual type of sign-up form is gonna have to have copy that it works for anyone who gets that page. And so the first factor that you gotta consider in writing the sign-up form is the voice you\'re doing that in. And it\'s not talking in weird voices, which I said earlier, I\'m not gonna do impressions, so I\'m not gonna just start talking in different voices now just to make you laugh, I\'ll try and do that in every other way. But focusing on the voice, and that\'s just the way you write, the personality that your words have. 02:27 DM: Yeah, and number one thing is don\'t be boring. There\'s like we\'ve said, there\'s so much competition out there. You wanna try to make sure your voice matches your brand, first of all. And second of all, that it speaks to the customer. So it\'s very different for if you say, \"Hey, check this out,\" or something like, \"Thanks for stopping by, would you like to check this out?\" One\'s a little bit more impersonal, but both of them have a different type of voice that may speak to a different type of person, right? 02:55 AS: Yeah, and to that point, you gotta remember, yes, in ones and zeros and in the digital sense of it, you\'re just getting an email address, but the reality is there\'s a person behind that email address. So one thing we do is we create buyer personas and different things to where we understand how we need to do our marketing towards those people. This is another aspect of that. Picture the person you\'re writing the sign-up form and the way you would talk to that person because that\'s the voice that your sign-up form should have is the way you talk to that person you\'re seeing in your mind\'s eye that is that potential subscriber that\'s right then and there. How do you talk to that person? You don\'t wanna sound like a robot or a machine, it\'s a human talking to a human, even though it\'s all happening on the computer. 03:43 DM: Exactly, and if you have different buyer personas, think about setting maybe different areas of your website that speaks to that different buyer persona, and then the sign-up form can better adjust to that type of voice. Right? I think Geico when they had this, \"Save 15 minutes or more,\" they had different types of ad. And I think... And I\'m sorry, this is way back when they were starting that out, and you could tell they were trying to figure out who is their buyer. And they had these different buyer personas with the same message, \"Save 15\". Some were really funny, some were serious, some were just like, what in the world did I just watch? And now they kind of landed in something in the middle that still addresses to the right type of person that\'s looking for the insurance company, and they\'re looking to save and so forth. But again, it was really interesting to see them do those different advertisements and test to figure out what was that overall buyer persona. For you, if you don\'t know who your buyer persona is yet, you may just wanna try to do testing first, but it\'s... The one thing that people tend to try to do is they look outward to try to find the buyer persona. Flip that around, look inward, who are you and who is the customer that you would wanna deal with? Times that by 1000, and there you go. 04:55 AS: Definitely. And as you\'re testing that out and doing the different things, you\'re staying true to your brand voice. If your brand can naturally and organically work in some humor, some wit, then do that, but don\'t do it trying to... There\'s nothing worse than a brand trying to be funny. You\'re either actually funny or don\'t go that route. You could be informational and educational, you can be sincere and cause the feels, whatever it is, elicit the emotions that fit your brand because otherwise it\'s not gonna be something that makes sense to those different personas. 05:30 DM: Yeah. If I were to be on Bank of America\'s website and they say, \"What\'s up, bro? You looking to subscribe?\" I would be worried that they got hacked. 05:38 AS: Yeah. You don\'t wanna keep your money with a bank that\'s calling you, \"Bro\". [chuckle] That\'s a rule I\'m putting out there. It doesn\'t involve email marketing, but we hope you learn that from this podcast, too. We\'re gonna pick back up with writing compelling copy to help you grow your list with the next couple of episodes. Thanks, everyone for tuning in. Goodbye.


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Growing a List: Feedback

Growing a List: Feedback

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 22, 2018

00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer, we\'re wrapping up our conversation about exit intent pop-up forms and how they relate to growing your email list. And this last one, we\'re gonna talk about is a feedback request. 00:36 Daniel Miller: Yeah, so a feedback request, I think now more than ever, where data is so prevalent in our lives, feedback is essential. If you aren\'t collecting feedback, oh, I don\'t know what to tell you. Find a way to do it because you can get so much information that was right there in front of you and you didn\'t know \'cause you didn\'t ask. So feedback is very important. Now, how does an exit intent form come to play into getting feedback? Well, like we just said in the previous episode, when people are searching for products on your site, they may not find it, they may go to exit out of your website. That\'s a great moment to show a pop-up form to ask them, \"Hey, did you not find what you were looking for? Please tell us so we can improve.\" You\'re doing two things there. As we mentioned, you\'re getting the email address to engage with them, as well as you\'re learning how to improve your website and overall buying experience. 01:25 DM: The other thing that we can use a feedback request form on, and this one, I wouldn\'t do it for every single time that this happens, but if somebody completes a purchase, they get to that thank you page. Maybe ask them about that buying cycle, how was the cart process for them and get feedback. Again, you are achieving two things, you are getting feedback from a customer, and you\'re getting an email to somebody that you can maybe create an automation for, to then ask them to write a public review somewhere else. 01:53 AS: Yeah, definitely. And like Daniel was saying, depending on where they encounter in the process, it\'s helping a new customer feel special and that they\'re valued. It\'s like, \"Hey, we appreciate what you have to say. Not just that you\'re a customer, we\'re always gonna thank you and appreciate you for that, but we value you to the extent that we wanna hear your opinion. So tell us what this process was like. How can we improve it? How can we make this better for you?\" That it\'s gonna make those customers you\'ve just got feel even more important or if it comes earlier in the process, and... The best feedback you get sometimes is from the angry people. We\'ve read the ask book and it talks about you wanna hear from those passionate people, whether they\'re real happy or real angry either way. That\'s the most valuable feedback you\'re getting. So maybe they were attracted to your site through an ad or through SEO or something that brought them in, but it wasn\'t exactly what they were looking for. And they might not be thrilled or maybe they just wanna tell you that, you\'re gonna understand the type of people you\'re attracting to your website and maybe the work you need to put in in certain other areas to make sure you\'re attracting your core customer. 03:01 DM: Yeah, and one thing that I wanna point out. Timing is everything with this one as well. What I mean by that is... Well, I guess, because we\'re talking about an exit intent, that makes sense, but this whole conversation brought me back to, I forget what website I was on, but I was blown away that they actually did this. It was a site, we could say a company as big as like a Microsoft, something like that. And I was on their website, and I literally just landed on it. And it said give us feedback on our website. It\'s like, \"Guys, I just landed on here. Are you seriously asking me to give you feedback on your website? Well, the feedback is don\'t give me this pop-up until at least I\'ve browsed through it,\" right? So when it comes down to it, I think the exit intent is good here because it\'s as they\'re leaving, you\'re asking for that feedback. Do not try to do something, do not ask for feedback as soon as they get in. If you wanna do a different type of pop-up and ask for feedback, try to set the rule to somebody that\'s visited at least five to 10 pages, something like that, to where they\'re actually gonna give you feedback that matters, not somebody that just landed on your home page and you\'re already asking for feedback. 04:03 AS: Definitely. And so just to recap what we\'ve been talking about with these exit intent forms, we\'ve talked about the reason for doing them is it\'s that last-ditch effort, last line of defense, Hail Mary, whatever other cliche we wanna throw in there that that effort, it\'s just gonna... As someone\'s walking out the door, leaving your website, you\'re gonna try and lasso them back in with this exit intent form. And you might wanna do that with freebies, discounts, special offers and if they\'re about to leave your shopping cart to make the sale right then and there or be able to follow up with an abandoned email, doing it with related products, in case they didn\'t find what they were looking for, and last but not least, as we\'ve been talking about this episode, to get feedback. So there\'s a lot of value in an exit intent form, a lot of ways to help you grow your list. We hope you explore them and tell us how you\'re using that on social media at @benchmarkemail. We wanna hear all about it. Our interns will be thrilled, you\'re chatting with them too. Thanks, everyone for listening and we\'ll catch you next time.


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Growing a List: Related Products

Growing a List: Related Products

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 21, 2018

Sometimes, consumers don\'t know what they don\'t know. They may have come to your site without knowing what they should be looking for, found something similar, but not exactly what they wanted. So, they give up and click to exit your site. Enter the Related Products Exit-Intent Popup Signup Form. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody to Clues to the clueless email marketer. We\'re still talking about exit intent pop up forms and growing your list. And this specific exit intent form we\'re gonna talk about today is a related products one, so if someone\'s on one of your product pages, didn\'t even get to the shopping cart like we talked about with the last episode, but they\'re on your product pages, they\'re going through your e-commerce store, and they\'re deciding to click out. This is that last ditch effort another type of exit intent pop up form that\'s gonna present them in that moment. 00:55 Daniel Miller: Exactly. So this is really geared towards what would be e-commerce stores and really people that have really large stores, that you\'re trying to go through something, you can\'t quite find what you\'re looking for. I mean, here we\'re really bending it to say you probably have a different type of problem, which it\'s your store, I guess workflows, but guess what? With pop up forms, you can kind of figure out and test what is that problem. So a good example is, if someone is about to buy something... I\'m sorry, not about to buy something. They are on the product page and they\'re about to leave. You may wanna ask them like, \"Hey did you not find what you\'re looking for? Tell us what that was.\" And then that can maybe help you do two things, help you fix your overall site workflows, as well as get their email address for future communication. 01:43 AS: Yeah, like Daniel is saying, yes, it could be an issue with the workflow of your e-commerce store. It\'s always harder when you set something up, \'cause it makes sense to you, but when you have someone that comes in for the first time and doesn\'t know, you don\'t know what you don\'t know. So they don\'t know what they\'re missing, they may in their head know what it is they want, but don\'t know how to articulate that on your website or the right way to look for that. So if you come in when they\'re about to leave and say, \"Hey here are some things that are kind of like this that you might be interested in, then they\'re like, \"Oh that\'s exactly what I wanted. I didn\'t even know that\'s what it is, but here it is right in front of me. And like I said, they thought it was a lost cause but... And the next thing you know, they\'re clicking on that, adding it to your cart and onto the next step and it\'s really just because they didn\'t know what exactly to look for and you helped them do it with that exit intent pop-up form. 02:38 DM: Yeah. And I cannot emphasize enough on this. Be very careful with disturbing your subscriber or your site visitor that could potentially buy without anything. So this is where timing and location plays a lot here, so make sure that you\'re not disrupting them. Because if I\'m about to buy something and I get this pop form that\'s telling me go over here, find all that other stuff. I may just say, \"Well, this website is really trying to get you to buy stuff, I\'m gonna go somewhere else.\" Right? Versus allowing your subscriber to naturally do what it is that they\'re gonna do, and again, they\'re leaving, they\'re about to leave your website entirely, that\'s the time that this pop-up should happen. Of course, it\'s the exit pop up, but I just wanted to make sure to make a point of that so we don\'t confuse it with just a regular pop-up. 03:23 AS: Yeah, definitely. And another advantage of this type of exit intent form is, if you\'ve got a little more sophisticated marketing software that you\'re using for these exit intent forms and it\'s been tracking where someone went on your website. We talked a little bit about, maybe they didn\'t find what they were looking for, maybe they didn\'t see something they had kind of piqued their interest earlier on, and they\'ve looked at so many things they forgot about it or they got soured on the idea when they had initially been excited about something. You can then come back with maybe some of those things they previously looked at in this related products exit intent form, because you know they looked at some of these pages that... It might not just be like, \"You don\'t know what you don\'t know.\" It\'s that reminder of like, \"Hey remember this cool thing over here that you thought was interesting? Let\'s take one last look of that before you go.\" 04:15 AS: Sometimes it\'s they\'re impulse buyers, they\'re the cash register. You just needed that little reminder that this thing existed for you to grab on the go. And you\'re not gonna lose customers that way. And like you said, whatever it is with these forms, it\'s just another way for you to ensure that you can grab that email address before they go. They might have not already been a subscriber and it\'s just one other way to grow that list when you got people come to your site and showing some interest in what you\'re doing. It\'s that hail Mary you throw to try and get them coming back later on when they were otherwise gonna leave your website. 04:49 AS: Alright, thanks everyone for listening, we\'ll catch you on the next one with our last episode focused on the Exit intent pop-up forms. Bye.


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See Our CRM Articles From Across the Web

See Our CRM Articles From Across the Web

CRM • August 21, 2018

We’ve been busy the past few weeks, looking for opportunities to share our wealth of knowledge on CRM. The result was some pretty rad guest blog opportunities for our team. First, Yersing Noriega shared “Why Every Business, No Matter the Size, Should Use CRM” on Customer Think. After all, every business owner needs to manage the relationships they have with their customers. If you need to manage your customer data beyond what your email marketing tool allows, or if it’s time to move beyond your spreadsheet’s, CRM is right for you. Yersing also wrote about “The CRM Views You Haven’t Considered, But Should” on MarTech Advisor. He discussed using views for specific tags, that show recently updated items, ones that show “is empty” so that you know when you need to collect more data and views based on custom fields. With these, you can improve your CRM game and the efficiency of your team. We also wrote about “CRM Hacks to Improve Your Productivity” for SEO Hacker. It all starts with integrating your CRM with your email marketing tool. Continuing the theme of integrating, we discussed connecting your CRM and Google Forms. You can also speed up your communication by using email templates with merge tags. Automation is also a friend of productivity. Additionally, you can create follow up tasks when importing data based on dates. Lastly, you can set up hidden fields that contain default values in order to autofill essential info. The last guest post that we wanted to share is on “Putting the Fun in Funnel: Learning to Enjoy the Sales Process” over on the XVerify blog. We all know that coffee is for closers. However, it’s nice to get that java without having to drive yourself crazy. That’s why we looked to where you can derive joy in the process of closing sales. We highlighted three points: using only essential milestones for your sales pipeline, using your reports and graphs and mapping probabilities. Check it out to learn about all three. That’s it for now. Stay tuned. We’ll be sharing additional articles as they go live.


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