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The Daily Lean Convene

The Daily Lean Convene

Lean Journey • May 9, 2017

When we decided to really commit to becoming LEAN at Benchmark, we knew we would have an extra challenge since our team is spread throughout the world.  Could we realistically teach the concept of Lean to our team of 140+ Benchmarkers who operate in 9 languages and 8 time zones?  More importantly, could we build a LEAN culture that would come to permeate how we make decisions and the way we work every day?  These were important questions our Leadership Team had to answer. We had already assembled our Lean Squad so now we had to land on how we would go about making Lean part of our daily lives.   We needed to drive home the lean message of continuous improvement.  We already had daily huddles and scrums and weekly Level 10 meetings for our various teams.  But we did not have a standing meeting that everyone in the company attended every day.  Would it really be possible to commit to meeting every work day in every one of our offices in the world?  Could we afford the loss of time?  The answer was absolutely!  In fact, we could not afford to NOT meet, especially if we wanted to have a true lean transformation.  We saw this as an investment in our team and we hoped they would see it the same way. I was especially concerned about our developers.  They tend to be very smart, matter of fact, black and white and not very touchy feely.  I could just imagine them saying ‘Why the heck are we wasting time on this?  I’ve got code to write!\' We decided we would meet every day for 19 minutes, so we named our meeting Lean 19.  Each of the 6 other regions picked a time that they could commit to daily.  In our headquarters in Los Alamitos, we chose 9:41 AM.  It was an odd time, so people remembered it.  We have an automatic Slack reminder that posts at 9:39 and then we “ring the bell” at 9:40.  Most of the team is already making their way to the conference room and are seated by 9:41. [caption id=\"attachment_5270\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"768\"] Our Lean 19 bell[/caption] For the first few months, our meetings consisted of learning Lean principles,  talking about our “2-Second Improvements” and reviewing one of our Core Values followed by an inspiring Ted Talk. At first, it was a little hard to get everyone on board and I think some of the team thought we were crazy.  I was especially concerned about our developers.  They tend to be very smart, to the matter of fact, black and white and not very touchy feely.  I could just imagine them saying, “Why the heck are we wasting time on this?  I’ve got code to write!”  However, I was so wrong.  Not only did they get on board, they loved it.  In fact, they seemed to take to Lean quicker than anyone else. Our first Lean 19 meeting was July 18, 2016.  We’ve had a meeting almost every work day since then and they just keep getting better. If you are interested in our daily Lean 19 agendas, just email me at denise.keller@benchmarkemail.com and I’d be happy to share my presentations with you.


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Lean Journey: Let’s Do it in the Bathroom

Lean Journey: Let’s Do it in the Bathroom

Lean Journey • April 20, 2017

When I first introduced Lean to the Benchmark team I was a little uncomfortable with a comment from Paul Akers, author of 2 Second Lean, stating that “it all starts in the bathroom.”  He maintains that there is no better place to start to build and maintain a culture of continuous improvement than in the bathroom.  Everyone uses it, so it’s a perfect place to apply the 3 S\'s:  sweep, sort and standardize. Sweep - a clean environment improves morale and actually makes it easier to identify equipment deterioration and/or malfunction Sort - sort everything and remove what is not necessary to the job at hand and get rid of all the clutter and junk Standardize - this involves building consensus in the workplace for best practices so that everybody understands what to expect and what is expected of them I wasn’t sure how the team would react to being asked to clean the bathroom.  We have a fabulous cleaning service and I certainly wasn’t trying to put them out of business.  The real goal was to get everyone to start thinking LEAN.  So I apprehensively shared this 3 S-ing idea with the team in our Daily Lean 19 meeting and was surprised by the positive reception.  Everyone was on board! My advice for people wanting to create a Lean culture is to start in the bathroom and roll it out slowly from there. Go ahead, do it in the bathroom! - Paul Akers We decided to divide our worldwide headquarters into seven main regions: men and women’s bathroom, kitchen, lobby, main conference room and supply room.  We did an enormous 3 S-ing day where everyone was assigned to one of the areas and we went to town getting everything spic n’ span.  It was actually fun. We made a Red Tag table for stuff that had been laying around for ages.  We invited people to take anything on the table.  Whatever was left over would be donated, recycled or trashed.  We got rid of loads of junk that was lowering our productivity. [caption id=\"attachment_5064\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"768\"] Just like Paul recommended, we went through each area- including the bathrooms- and 3S-ed.[/caption] Everyone- including our CEO, Curt Keller,  takes a turn maintaining a different area for the week. We announce the weekly 3S-ing assignments in our Daily Lean 19 meeting and in Slack.  It rotates around and thanks to our standardized visual procedures, they know exactly what needs to be done. [caption id=\"attachment_5070\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"768\"] Now our bathrooms are spotless all the time ... and our cleaning service loves us as we’ve made their job easier![/caption] Building a Lean culture requires standardizing and simplifying everything.   By starting with the bathroom, you embrace one of the main tenets of Lean which is respect for people. Leaving the bathroom cleaner than you found it is a very basic sign of respect and courtesy for others. The toilet seat is down and there is no icky stuff to navigate. I’d love to hear what you have done in your office to help build a Lean culture. Please share in the comments!


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Go Lean or Go Home

Go Lean or Go Home

Lean Journey • August 11, 2016

About 4 months ago, I was doing my morning workout at the gym on the treadmill- something I absolutely loathe. Unlike my husband Curt, who is athletic, fit and competitive, I am none of the above and see exercise as a necessary evil (I hope one day to be in good enough shape to celebrate my 90th birthday as we just did for my dad). [caption id=\"\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"1199\"] Our family traveled from near and far to celebrate my dad, Frank, for his 90th birthday.[/caption] The only way I can make it through the 45 minutes of agony is to have an interesting diversion, so I watch a variety of business and personal development videos while speed walking at level 5 incline. On this morning four months ago, I watched a video presentation from the Growth Institute by Paul Akers called 2-Second Lean. I was absolutely blown away by the simplicity of what he had to say. Lean, which was pioneered by Toyota, is all about the elimination of waste and the focus on continuous improvement. 2-Second Lean, an even simpler concept, requires every person on the team to makes a 2-second improvement every day. As Paul says: Just give me a single 2-second improvement a day. That’s it. That’s all I ask for. A 2 second improvement. There is not a person on earth that can’t figure out how to improve something by 2 seconds. On the way home, I told Curt that I just watched the most awesome video and he needed to watch it too. After some serious pestering, I got him to watch it with me during lunch. He was hooked- and believe me, he does not jump on board very easily. Our next step was to share the video at our weekly Leadership meeting. The Leadership Team also loved what Paul had to say and believed Benchmark could benefit greatly from implementing Lean. However, we still had to get buy in from one more very important group and that was our international managers. We had to be sure that the Lean concept would work across our nine languages, nine offices and diverse cultures. We shared the 2-Second Lean video at our semi-annual international sales meeting held at our Los Alamitos headquarters and got an overwhelming thumbs up from the international managers. [embed]https://youtu.be/hlYvmkYvA8A[/embed] I read Paul\'s book, 2-Second Lean, and also shared that with the Leadership team. The more we talked about it, the more certain we were that we were ready to embark on a Lean journey at Benchmark. This blog post is the first in a new series that chronicles that process. I will share the victories and the challenges. It is intended to help any organization that is interested in implementing Lean, no matter if they are a SaaS company like us, a non-profit or a one person start up. A friend once referred to my personal motto as, “Go Big or Go Home.” Looks like it’s time for a new slogan!  


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How Your Brand Can Emulate Hyundai’s Incredible Turnaround

Beyond • April 13, 2012

The Hyundai Pony was Korea’s first mass-produced car and went on to be a bestseller around the world, including Canada where it was the country’s largest-selling car in the ‘80s. Wags have observed that the reason for the sales was likely that owners needed to buy a second car for spare parts as the Pony had the reliability of a grenade with the pin pulled. It was definitely a car that made motorists nostalgic for the Yugo. But it was cheap so it sold. This reputation for cheap, fragile, tinny cars haunted Korean manufacturers through subsequent iterations of models, which soon became fodder for late-night standup jokes: Why do Hyundais have heated rear windows? To keep your hands warm while you push What’s on the back cover of the Hyundai owner’s manual? The bus schedule What is a Hyundai at the top of a hill? A miracle How do you double the value of a Hyundai? Fill the tank #1 in Customer Loyalty? Hyundai? After decades of being the butt of jokes, Hyundai suddenly leapt ahead not only of its own embarrassing brand identity but the entire automotive market. By massively revising (read: revolutionizing) their product line they gained market share faster than any car manufacturer in history. Both Experian and Kelley BlueBook rated Hyundai as the number one brand in customer loyalty, and yes, that means that the formerly lowly little Korean brand beats Mercedes Benz, BMW, Audi and any other luxury brand you can name. Hyundai’s Magic Trick What Hyundai did to pull off this magic trick was basically throw out the blueprints along with the drawing board. The latest cars bear no resemblance to the econoboxes that sullied their dealerships just a few years ago. Their entry level Accent is now soundly beating standard-bearers Honda’s Civic and Toyota’s Corolla on every possible level: build quality, performance, fuel economy, styling and price. The same applies to their thoroughly reimagined product line all the way up to their luxocruiser Equus which takes direct aim at unimaginably august automobiles such as the BMW 7-Series, Mercedes S-Class and Audi A8... and trounces them mercilessly. The Equus even comes in a stretch limousine version! A Hyundai Limo. Really! Any Rip Van Winkle waking up to the prospect of a Hyundai limo could certainly be forgiven for thinking he is in another dimension. The re-creation of Hyundai from a purveyor of slovenly student/secretary econocommuters to the positioning of an entire full-fledged product line that shellacs the competition from any nation and at any price point was accomplished by: Ignoring the past – Determining that its Pony/Excel past was no more relevant to its future than the Edsel is to Ford’s, Hyundai unapologetically aspired to the aura of a world-class brand. Building the best – Quality has always been and continues to be a primary driver of sales in any product. By thoroughly reengineering and revitalizing its entire production paradigm, Hyundai has matched or exceeded its competition. Making it look good – Hyundai’s swoopy styling has been widely lauded. Providing value – Hyundai’s quality is available at far less than its competitors’ comparable models. Hyundais are generally 10-20% cheaper than what would be expected for a similar car, thus powerfully appealing to recession-weary consumers. Invoking Public Amnesia Any brand can emulate the Hyundai turnaround business model: All it takes is to realize that no matter what your company’s niche or reputation, it can be thoroughly rehabilitated by offering jaw-dropping products at the best prices around. All of a sudden no one will remember what borderline junk you were trying to push in 2005, 1995 or before, as they’ll be too busy stampeding to your checkout. How Hyundai managed to leapfrog from ugly duckling to perfect princess is a study in how any brand can reinvent itself in the blink of an eye to gain a phenomenal competitive advantage. It also speaks volumes as to how short the brand memory of the public really is. If your brand can invent the better mousetrap, then it is still true that the world will beat a path to your door.


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More Branding Tips: How the Pieces Add to the Big Picture

Beyond • March 23, 2012

Your product, service or company doesn’t necessarily have to be unique, but your brand should be. It is your brand that separates your business from the crowd and allows it to stand out on its own. Seeing that it is an ongoing process, branding also happens to be one of the toughest challenges a business will ever be presented with. It isn’t necessarily easy to establish an identity and personality that is not only instantly recognizable to customers and staff, but shareholders, media and the general public as well. On a positive note, giving your business the visibility it needs to be successful is a relatively straightforward process when you approach branding with a plan. The following tips can prove useful whether you are undergoing a rebranding phase, or building a new one from the ground up. Make It a Team Effort Branding should never be left in the hands of one individual. That’s just asking for frustration and lackluster results. More than likely, you will find that goals are much easier to meet when the entire team is behind the company’s efforts. Instead of shutting them out, let team members get involved and provide input for your strategy. Sit down at the round table so everyone knows what needs to be done, and what role they will play in the process. By introducing a team element, you stand to make your branding efforts stronger than ever. Be Conscious of Spending Getting a brand off the ground can cost you a pretty penny. Things tend to get even more costly when you have to go back to the drawing board and rethink your strategy. Like they say: It takes money to make money, but that doesn’t mean you should go throwing dollars at trendy marketing and technology solutions just to give your business an edge. The one thing you can’t buy is success (many have tried). When the moment calls, don’t hesitate to turn to partners, staff and even knowledgeable family members for ideas that could help fine-tune your strategy. Design with the Customer in Mind It doesn’t matter if you design software or sell good times at the local pub, your products or services must be useful to the audience they aim to serve. Sure, value is often subjective from one individual to the next, but if a large number of your customers are complaining, you obviously have a problem. Sometimes, in order to create experiences that will suit the customer, you have to actually put yourself in their shoes. For example, calling your support line to see how agents treat you as a customer is a simple way to get firsthand insight that can be used to create branding that your audience responds to. Look and Learn Feeling like you just can’t get this branding thing right? If so, don’t hesitate to study some of the businesses in your field that are making noise. Where are they trying to establish a presence? What methods are they using to build awareness? What type of results are they seeing? You don’t have to limit this analysis to the organizations you are in direct competition with, either. There is much to be learned from businesses who are not in your field as well. The broader your perspective, the more fuel you will have to drive your branding initiatives.Remember, building a strong brand is an ongoing effort, so you must continue to reevaluate your position, activities and strategies on a consistent basis. The moment you relax is when competitors can get closer in your rearview and even pass you by.


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A Brief Introduction to Business Branding

Beyond • March 8, 2012

A brand is much more than the name of a company or product. It’s about who you are and how you are perceived, and whether personal- or business-related, that perception is extremely important. The good thing is that this perception is something you can control. You can create your own image and mold the expectations of your audience all by knowing how to properly construct your brand. Define Who You Are You probably have a good idea of what you’re all about, but how do you express that to your public? You need to define who you are, and in order to do that, you must challenge yourself with questions such as these: What is my area of speciality? What do I do? Who is my audience? How would they describe me? What do I want them to think about me? This first step is essential for getting your branding efforts off the ground. It not only helps define you, it helps people actually find you. For example, knowing how your audience would describe you can help you identify the keywords that allow them to find you in the search engines. Create Recognition Search, social media and the internet in general make getting a brand discovered far easier than it has ever been in past times. However, all the visibility in the world isn’t likely to do you any good if you don’t stand out. You need to create recognition, and one of the most effective ways to do this is to make design a key component in your branding strategy. This component will account for things like: Logos Slogans Corporate Colors Websites Email Campaigns The importance of design in branding should never be underestimated. You would be surprised at the fantastic results a brand can generate from instant visual recognition. It is a crucial aspect that has helped numerous companies enhance their image and boost their profits. Brand Your Content Content is one of the most important elements in a branding strategy, so you definitely need to make sure that all the material you create on and offline is a reflection of your brand. As an expert in the video editing field, for instance, you may want to start by offering your readers tips and tutorials, and then branch off into other segments of the field. There is nothing wrong with that, but if you start expanding into off-topic areas such as home improvement and fashion, you will lose your audience quickly. Stick with content that people can easily keep up with, and build your brand around it. Inject Your Personality A strong brand is not just recognizable on first glance. It has its own identity, flair and personality. Everything else aside, it is personality that is going to separate you from the competition. When you associate personality with your brand, you will be able to generate new business and great overall results on that attribute alone. The Air Jordan line of Nikes may be a quality shoe, but NBA great Michael Jordan is the personality associated with the brand, and his name alone has moved an incredible amount of units over the last 25 years. This is just one example of how powerful personality can be in branding.


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Workplace Optimization: Great Lessons for Business Managers

Beyond • February 14, 2012

Whether the team operates in a virtual environment where everyone works from home or a traditional office setting, being able to effectively manage the workplace is crucial for management. It is also one of the most challenging aspects of a manager’s job. Let’s be real here - almost everyone has something they could or would rather be doing instead of going to work on a daily basis. On top of that, there are some days when even the most motivated of employees just does not feel like punching the clock and tending to their job-related responsibilities. Even managers and high ranking executives have their dog days, but as authority figures, it is usually their job to ensure that conditions in the workplace are optimal. There is no guarantee that the ride will always be smooth and easy, but there are a few things that can be done to create an environment staff and team members enjoy being a part of every day they come to work. Bring out the Best in Your Workers We would like to think that each of our workers is always giving their best, but that is just not realistic. Over time, it is possible that some of your team members will grow bored with their job because they feel like they are not being challenged. Instead of coming down hard on them, it might be better to encourage them to discover and maximize the use of their talents. This may even call for you to assign the worker to an entirely new position and role, but if they are truly a good fit for your organization, doing what it takes to keep them happy and motivated will likely result in a win-win for both sides. Sprinkle in a Little Fun It is probably not a good idea for employees to spend the majority of the day goofing off, but there is nothing wrong with having a workplace environment the staff views as a fun place to hang out. So what can you do to liven things up? Raffles, lottery pools and birthday celebrations for employees are just a few examples of fun ideas that will have your crew circling dates on their calendars in anticipation. Perhaps the best thing you can do in this regard is round up the team and kick around ideas about what is truly fit for the fun schedule. This way, you can create occasions that everyone actually looks forward to, rather than loathe and ridicule when huddled in the break room. Show Appreciation One of the most effective ways to maintain an ideal workplace environment is to simply recognize the quality performances your employees are logging, and show that those efforts are appreciated. In fact, you should aim above and beyond when it comes to demonstrating just how much they are appreciated. Although it always helps to be financially endowed, showering staff with appreciation does not require you to strain the budget. For instance, you could create a “kudos” or similar program that recognizes and rewards them with points that lead to a bigger reward each time they go above and beyond. Rewarding hard work will drive them to work even harder. Different business owners tend to take different approaches to managing the work environment. Some choose to run such a tight ship that they suck all the fun and life out of the operation. Then you have others who take a laid back approach, and try to be more of a friend than a boss. Everyone has their own methods, but in most cases, it is that careful balance of both that creates the best possible environment for staff and management.


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How a Small Business Can Improve Its Word of Mouth Advertising

Beyond • February 9, 2012

Luckily, for the small business, there are numerous marketing tactics to lean on in today’s digital world. However, word of mouth advertising is often held in higher regard than many traditional techniques, particularly by consumers. A study recently put out by the Word of Mouth Marketing Association showed that 49% of American consumers view it as credible. The Word of Mouth Marketing Association may have more skin in the game than most, but this does make sense at a primal level: people trust the word of friends and peers over companies. Following are some tips on how a small business can improve their branding via word of mouth advertising. Pick the Right Channel There are many channels a small business can utilize to create word of mouth buzz for their brand, and these days there is no need to look any further than social media. Whether it is Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn or another network, social media can prove highly effective at spreading the word about your organization, as well as the products or services associated with it. The great thing about the social channel is that it can take your message farther than it would have been able to travel otherwise, giving you the opportunity to reach hundreds, or even thousands of people. This is compounded by the fact that those followers can take your message even further by sharing it with their friends. Interact with Your Audience Maybe you are using social media to conduct your branding. Maybe you’re working traditional channels, or maybe you are using a combination of both. Wherever you’re based, it is extremely important to engage and interact with your audience. Creating a profile on a popular social network and sharing a link to your website is not going to cut it. You need to be active, engaging your audience members in dialogue and sharing useful information. Ironically, word of mouth is not all about advertising, but when done right it can result in big sales numbers. Establish a Good Reputation Spreading your message through the right channels and engaging your audience are both important, but in the end, the strength of your word of mouth advertising efforts will depend on your brand’s reputation. It doesn’t matter how large your audience is or how active you are, the response you get will be lukewarm at best if a bad reputation is following the word from prospect to prospect. So above all, you must learn how to manage expectations and keep your reputation intact, because if it takes too big a hit, making a full recovery could be next to impossible - just ask Paul Christoforo. Word of mouth advertising is the oldest form of marketing there is. It is still among the most effective, even in the days of information technology, internet services and mobile communications. Recommendations from friends and like-minded people are more valuable than ever to consumers, and the sooner small businesses realize this, the better they will do at branding, advertising and marketing in general.


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Being a Better Business Leader: Eliminating Egoism & Bad Habits

Being a Better Business Leader: Eliminating Egoism & Bad Habits

Beyond • January 25, 2012

Whether a company experiences success or failure is largely dependent on its leadership. Throughout history, we have witnessed some of the world\'s most powerful companies plummet into nonexistence because of poor leadership at the executive level. Rubbermaid, Schwinn and former telecommunications giant WorldCom are just a few that come to mind. If a company is going to survive, its leaders must avoid mistakes, better yet, bad habits such as these at all costs: Inability to Separate Ego from Business In order to be successful, a company must be driven by business executives that live and breathe for the organization under which they are employed. On the other hand, that drive can turn out to be a bad thing when their passion is misplaced and misguided. Executives who are unable to separate organizational goals from their own personal ambitions often fall hard, and can even take the companies they represent down with them. Need more proof? Look no further than Enron, a story many call one of the most shocking business failures in history. At the turn of the millennium, Enron was arguably the biggest thing going in the gas and oil industry. The one-time giant of Fortune 500 stature was riding high until times got tough and bad decisions started to be made on the leadership end. All of a sudden, Enron was losing money at an alarming rate, and to make matters worse, executives started covering up losses by removing liabilities from the company’s financial statements, and hiding the truth from investors. By 2002, Enron was in such bad shape that it was forced to file bankruptcy, which at the time marked the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history. The man who shouldered most of the blame for the Enron scandal and subsequent fall was Jeffrey Skilling, the company’s former president and CEO. Despite being the financial guru partly responsible for Enron’s huge success in the early 1990s, Skilling was also known as an egotistical entrepreneur who took perhaps one too many risks. The poor leadership that befell this once prominent corporation will be studied at business institutions around the world for years to come. Refusal to Listen There is nothing wrong with having confidence. After all, it is a quality every business executive needs to lead their company down the path of success. However, it is that little taste of success that can easily cause that confidence to turn into arrogance. And when arrogance settles in, there could be no getting through to the executive who thinks they know it all. The downside to this is that tuning out the advice of others creates a level of inflexibility that restricts adaptation and growth, both of which are vital for any company. Savvy business executives realize that leading an organization is much more than being the head man (or woman) with all the bright ideas. They understand that when it comes to what’s right for the company, the best decisions are often those that are made with input from other members of the administrative team. As simple as it sounds, not all businesses get it, hence why the number of failed companies is going up. Failure to Adapt One trait shared by many of the companies we have seen crumble in recent times was the failure to adapt to the changes in their market and what’s going on around them. Not realizing that there is no future in the static business model, they stick with it under the belief that those same tactics will remain effective for as long as they need them to be. Not only is this a practice that can leave an organization stuck in drive, it could send it barreling in reverse. In today’s highly competitive business environment, the ability to adapt with the times and roll with the punches as they’re thrown is a skill that must be acquired. If you are a business executive who thinks you have even a hint of these bad habits within you, I advise you to work on completely eliminating them right away. Look at them as the collective bad vibe you do not want anywhere near the workplace. Your employees will thank you.


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This Season, Remember Benchmark’s Free PTA & Kids Programs

This Season, Remember Benchmark’s Free PTA & Kids Programs

Beyond • December 29, 2011

Today’s sluggish economy is showing no mercy nor favoritism as it has taken a toll on individuals and organizations alike. Yet we’ve heard surprisingly less about plans to shore up the financial woes of the education sector than we have about who did or did not receive bail outs. So Benchmark Email decided to help, in the best way that we can. It matters to us and it matters to the future. Our Way of Making a Difference Understanding that the national educational system is in a financial rut, we here at Benchmark Email have decided to play our part by launching a new initiative aimed at helping children get the support they need. It all started with our PTA Sponsorship Program, which is designed to help PTAs, PTOs and PTSAs get the email tools and service they need to efficiently communicate without having to pay one red cent. We are now going beyond that by extending our powerful email platform to any not for profit organization involved in a cause aimed at helping our children - completely free! All the Features of Our Award-Winning Software Email marketing has a lot to offer a non-profit. It’s extremely economical, a great communicator and highly effective at creating the relationships it takes to keep your supporters engaged. If the central focus of your organization is paving a brighter future for the children of the world, then our expertise is at your service; technicians, customer service agents, user-friendly features and all. The We Care About Kids program gives you all the features our commercial customers gladly pay for. This includes our user-friendly text editor, robust reporting system and hundreds of customizable templates. Whether it’s testing for maximum effectiveness or integrating with Facebook and Twitter, we provide the type of sponsorship that covers all your email communication needs. We Care About Kids The economy has had a devastating effect on many families, and the kids often feel it just as hard as the parents. Some have to live with the constant worry of doing without the necessary school supplies, overcrowded classes, if they may have to relocate and lose contact with friends and other things no child should have to stress about. Then again, the U.S. economy and school system is a model of perfection compared to the impoverished conditions kids have to deal with in other countries. This is why we are lending our support to any honest organization who makes it their mission to help children - because they need all of our support. Benchmark realizes that this is a small contribution compared to the numerous aid organizations out there, but this is our way of helping them, and helping you, reach out and connect with the world. We can be the tool you use to engage new hearts and minds.


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