Series Posts: Beyond

6 Email Trends in Vogue This Year

6 Email Trends in Vogue This Year

Beyond • February 28, 2019

The latest statistics of the number of Vogue readers are from several years ago, and they show that Vogue has reached 15.7 million readers in the United States. That number definitely has gone up by now, but just imagine how many millions of Vogue readers there are all over the world. Vogue is constantly enhancing its email marketing strategy because that’s precisely what helps attract new readers and engage them in Vogue’s fresh, original, and compelling content. Email marketing experts at Vogue are bringing new email trends this year, and you should definitely take a page from their book. Take a look at the six email trends that Vogue is following right now so that you can learn something from their strategy and make sure that yours is just as effective. Attracting Mobile Users Attracting mobile users definitely isn’t a new concept, but it’s one that a lot of marketers still avoid for some reason. They don’t realize the huge potential of mobile and the importance of engaging mobile users into their brand. If you still don’t have a good mobile strategy, here’s Vogue to the rescue. Vogue has an app for the digital version of its magazine, which its avid readers can use to stay engaged in their content and all the latest fashion trends anywhere they are, and anytime they want. But how does Vogue compel its readers to get Vogue for their mobile devices? It sends them an email! In the email screenshot above, you can see Vogue showcasing every tablet it’s available on, enticing its email subscribers to get Vogue for their favorite mobile devices. If you don’t have an app for your content, simply make sure your website is mobile-friendly, and let your subscribers know it. Did you know that 94% of people judge websites on responsive web design? Without a mobile-friendly site, you lose lots of opportunities for growth and higher ROI, and your email newsletter is the best tool to promote it and attract mobile users. Grabbing Attention with Eye-Catching Visuals Vogue wouldn’t be where it is now if it hadn’t been providing its readers with beautiful and eye-catching visuals, apart from its original and unique content, of course. This also isn’t a new trend for Vogue, but the magazine does include more and more visuals these days in all its emails. You can write a compelling email copy to engage new readers but enriching it with compelling visuals will instantly capture your subscribers’ attention. Take a look at how Vogue does it. In the email shown above, the first thing you see is “VOGUE TREND ALERT”. It instantly grabs attention. The second thing you see is the runway models wearing beautiful pieces of the latest fashion trends. You cannot help but click through to find out more. And that’s how you engage people. Visuals tap into their emotions and they want to find out more about what you have to say or offer. So, be sure to enrich your every email with irresistible images, infographics, graphs, or anything else that will help you appeal to your audience. Incorporating Videos in Emails According to video marketing statistics by IMPACT, the number of businesses using videos in email increased from 36% to 46% in the past year. This is because, according to Forbes, 90% of customers say that videos help them with their purchasing decisions, while 64% of customers say that they’re more likely to purchase a product after watching a video about it. Videos are much more powerful than images, and Vogue is one of those numerous businesses that follow the trend of incorporating video content into their emails. In Vogue’s email shown above, Vogue invites its readers to check out its archive and uncover hidden gems that may inspire them and help them improve their fashion style. Offering Exclusive Content Yet another one of the great ways to capture more email leads is to offer exclusive content. Offer your email subscribers an incentive that they won’t be able to refuse, and you’ll manage to guide them up the engagement ladder and into your sales funnel. One of the ways Vogue does this is by offering its email subscribers full-year access to exclusive interviews with the biggest names in the fashion industry, top photographers’ images to inspire them, and many other pieces of content regarding fashion trends, style, culture, food, and much more. Blending Quizzes With audience engagement taking an edge with email marketing, it has become quite easier for anyone to know their readers\' preferences and shape up their content. Including a quiz or a survey with great title definitely prompts the readers to take it up. Questions about the latest trends and readers’ expectations with upcoming fashion help magazines to shape up their content. These days, the online quiz creator is in trend. Editorials are using such tools to create online quizzes and embed them to their emails or social media pages. This not only helps magazines with their content but also enhances communication. Including the Readers in Their Brand The best way to truly engage your audience in your brand and form meaningful relationships is to actually include them in what you do. It makes them feel special and builds trust and long-lasting loyalty. Vogue encourages its readers to share their Vogue story, which may end up being published in one of their next issues. The readers are invited to share their experience with the magazine and tell the world how Vogue has influenced them and made their life better. If you can find a similar way to connect with your audience and really include them in your brand, you’ll build a strong base of loyal customers who will eventually become your brand advocates. Do you have an interesting Vogue experience you’d like to share? What about your email marketing? Are you already following these email trends? Are you using some other email strategies that are helping you generate quality leads? Feel free to share your experience in the comments section below!


Read More
We ❤️ Newsletters: Tips and Inspiration from the Newsletters our Email Marketing Experts Love Most

We ❤️ Newsletters: Tips and Inspiration from the Newsletters our Email Marketing Experts Love Most

Beyond • February 14, 2019

Newsletters are probably the form of email marketing that businesses and consumers are most familiar with. They provide the perfect excuse to visit your subscribers’ inbox whether it be monthly, weekly or even daily and help you stay top of mind. Why are newsletters so popular? The New York Times newsletter readers read two times as many stories as those who don’t receive newsletters. They’re also two times as likely to become paid subscribers. They have  more than 50 newsletters with a grand total of 14 million subscribers. It’s the goal of their newsletters to “build meaningful relationships with readers by delivering our original, world-renowned journalism and product experiences straight to their inbox.\" Newsletter readers spend 80% more time on NewYorkTimes.com than non subscribers So, what makes for a lovable newsletter? Here are a handful of tips for making a newsletter that your subscribers will love: Keep your subscribers in mind. Sure you’re sharing updates about your company and goods and services, but it must be with your subscribers’ needs in mind. Solve their problems and you’ll see the results. Choose a template that can be customized for your brand. Make sure you choose a newsletter template that’s set up to serve your goals for your newsletter and that it feels like it comes from your company. Use subheaders. Attention spans are at an all time low and subscribers will more than likely be skimming your email. Make it easy for them with subheaders. Keep it short and simple. Use teasers for each piece of content and bring your subscribers to your website to read the rest. Use captivating images. Grab those skimmers’ attention with some great photos or graphics. Send regularly. Monthly newsletters may be the most popular, but some businesses prefer to send weekly or even daily. You want to stay top-of-mind with your subscribers so that your business is the first they think of when they’re in need of your goods or services. Check your reports. It’s important to track what is (or isn’t) working with your newsletters. If your open rate could use a boost, test different subject lines and make sure you have a familiar From Name. If your click-through rate could be higher, try including different content in your newsletters. At Benchmark Email, we love newsletters as much as the businesses who use our tools to send them. And we see a lot of them! I asked the Benchmark team across the globe to share some of their favorite newsletters with all of you. Here’s what they had to say: Adastros Cruz - The Artist Formerly Known as Senior Marketing Designer - Guatemala What I love about this email from Grammarly is how the content is goal oriented, this was their \'new year\' email and at the end of it they included a recap of their 2018 but kept it customer-focused. See the full email here. What I love about this newsletter from Muzli is the content I get, but also how simple it is, just an image a graphic and a clear short and sweet CTA. Daniel Miller - Marketing Director - USA Subaru is one of my favorite newsletters. If you’ve ever owned a Subaru, you’ve experienced what it means to be part of the Subaru family. Subaru’s real marketing kicks in after one has purchased a vehicle. From tips to where to camp, hike and travel with your new baby (the car that is) to new releases, rally competitions they’ve won and even experiences shared by other drivers. No matter what level of “car expert” you are, Subaru speaks their customers language. Adventure, discovery and fun! Their newsletter backs their message and creates brand loyalty. I ❤️ my Subaru and the way the company treats me. Fernanda Brito - Social Media & Digital Partner - Mexico I really liked the content in this email from Cracks, it is also practical and quick to read, without a doubt I expect the next email. 😊 I like the design of this Cool Hunger MX email which has a lot of color and notes of interest as well as city events related to art and design. Love Veg always shares new recipes and ideas according to the seasons of the year. Ronald Liang - Frontend Development Manager - USA Kumar Guarav - Email Deliverability & Support - India They say great minds think alike and Ronald and Kumar shared love for the same email. Here\'s what they said: Ronald: I love receiving these newsletters from Smashing Magazine, because they’re a quick way to catch up on the latest web design news and topics. Their newsletter is text-heavy, but they do throw in some playful graphics of their mascot here and there that keeps it fun. Kumar: I love the way these guys present the entire newsletter, the content at the top includes a brief description/welcome message from the Editor, Table of content at the top with every article numbered and linked accordingly to the actual article in the newsletter. Proper spacing between the articles, fonts large enough to be readable on all devices. Sponsor ads being marked accordingly and finally at the end, sender information and the purpose of the newsletter. Everything is presented in a very professional format. Kristen Pon - Senior Product Designer - USA I also love getting Action Rocket’s newsletters because it keeps me up to date with email industry news (they compile articles from various sources). Also, over time I’ve seen them test out various things to push email boundaries like switching up their layouts, adding interactions, etc because of who their audience is. (At the top they mention they use experimental code) Sorry, the forwarding of their newsletter breaks those things so you can’t see it.. but this is what their newsletter normally looks like. Action Rocket also does special newsletters every so often, like this one here. It\'s goal is to show how much of an email shows above the fold. Yamile Flores - Learning Experience Designer - Mexico I have a lot of subscriptions in several newsletters: fashion, shoes, food, recipes, but this that comes from NESTLE I really love it, Why? As you can see since the subject line has my  son’s name, then this newsletter reminds when my son turns months /years and what he should achieve in that month, some recipes I can cook for him and other important facts relative to his age. So I really love to read it and keep it. It’s a pity the promotions are just for Spain, not for México, but still I like it. I reminds me to say Congratulations Jaden! Every month. Denise Keller - COO - USA I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE getting this email from Tim Ferriss every Friday like clockwork. It’s 5 bullets, so it’s quick and easy to read while I’m sitting a traffic light.  It is always informative and I inevitably learn something I didn’t know before. This is one of my top 5. I’m forever taking screenshots of this newsletter from Scott’s Cheap Flights and sending them to family and friends saying “Let’s GO!” I love the easy to read format and the info telling the best way to book this particular flight. Even though I rarely cook, I thoroughly enjoy Ina Garten’s occasional newsletter emails. They are super basic, no fancy graphics with an easy link to her recipe.  My husband and I actually made this one and it was FAB! Alvaro Rosado - Product Design - Mexico I like this email for the brightness of the images, the animations and the clarity of the message. The text is really easy to read and understand. Also it has clear call to actions that allow me to understand what to do next. Jason Ashley - Web App. Development Manager - USA I like the Crunchbase Daily newsletter because it gives links to the latest updates of companies to watch, and the subject line refers to the companies too. Goes to variety of blogs. The newsletter content is a lead in to a blog. Also, the blogs have links to outside resources used for research, so the newsletter is like a gateway to different blogs and the different blogs have multiple resources which are commonly other blogs on the same subject. I like this Node Weekly newsletter because it references the latest updates of node.js a programming language I like to stay on top of. The sections reference multiple resources from a variety of common well known blogs from different community services. It really helps to stay on top of what’s new, and if nothing new, to see the items those in the community feel are important. This is my favorite of all time. It gives the graphs of my favorite currencies, their projected short term trend, the give rates, the levels they see as resistance and support to watch for. Allows for a quick view of trend and cross currency comparison on similar pairs. This is my absolute favorite email for the last 7 years since I found it. Bulat Kutliev - Frontend Engineer - Russia I like Medium’s customized feed for me, with additional nice recommended topics. Topics are sorted from more specific to common articles. The design is also minimalistic and neat. Lucas Braga Peres - Customer Engagement Specialist - Brazil The content has my name and the name of the course that I have done here in Brazil on the main text. Then, they suggested more courses based on my certification level, with CTAs and images. Also, they have social media links and the image and text proportion is ok. Emperatriz Ortegón - Marketing Designer - Colombia I really like video games, especially the competition and co-op games. always I want to know any news, updates or offers for video games that I play, so I choose this email from my favorites. Epic Games aaaalways sends me information about events, new maps, new game styles on the platform. I also like how they use colors, images and the newsletter structure is not too rigid and clean.


Read More
We Hosted Rodney Couch the CEO & Founder of Preferred Hospitality, Inc.

We Hosted Rodney Couch the CEO & Founder of Preferred Hospitality, Inc.

Beyond • February 8, 2019

Rodney Couch doesn\'t just have the typical story of going from the dishwasher in a restaurant to running the whole place. He worked his way from the ground up and found a way to do things differently in the service industry. Now, with transparency on their side, his company Provider is disrupting the contract foodservice industry. Trust is not something easily earned in the environment that we currently live in. Profit is not a bad word, but it does and can be abused by vendors and contractors. People are very suspect. That\'s one of the core initiatives that I have when dealing with customers. We need to earn their trust and that doesn\'t happen overnight. It can happen, and when it does happen, you find yourself in a very collaborative relationship. If you prefer to read, the transcript is posted below: 00:14 Andy Shore: Hey everybody, welcome back to the Heart of Business. I\'m Andy Shore, here, as always, is my trusted co-host, Daniel Miller. 00:19 Daniel Miller: Hello everybody. 00:20 AS: And we have an awesome guest for you today. His name is Rodney Couch, and he is the founder and CEO of several restaurants, contract food service, all sorts of stuff. We did it during our lunch break and I know I was ready to go eat afterwards. We sampled some of their restaurants and they\'re quite good. 00:42 DM: Very, very good. 00:43 AS: And he\'s got a great story and they\'re doing some fun stuff and disrupting the industry. So, we were excited to talk to him. Before we get started, I wanna remind everybody about the Benchmark Starter Plan. For up to 2,000 of your contacts, you do your email marketing totally free, let you get started, start sending those first emails, start building those relationships with those subscribers. Check it out, benchmarkemail.com. Let\'s get rolling. 01:06 AS: So, how you doing today, Rodney? 01:08 Rodney Couch: I\'m great, thank you. And yourself? 01:10 AS: Oh, we\'re doing good, doing good. We\'re recording on a Friday, and happy that that\'s finally here, it\'s been a long week. But we\'ve got you here and we\'re excited to talk to you and hear more about everything you do. So, you\'re the CEO and founder of Preferred Hospitality, can you tell us a little bit about that company? 01:30 RC: Sure, yeah. We started our business back in 1989 with the seafood restaurant called Market Broiler and developed a number of those retail brands across the State of California. We\'ve also started a contract food service division, where we\'ve been serving other clients in mostly the educational sector, with some government and schools and others. And so, that business has grown over the years. And then we also have a chain, or involved in a chain of restaurants called Blue Water Grill where I\'m a general partner and we have eight restaurants throughout Southern California under that brand, mostly at water locations. 02:24 AS: Very cool. And where did you get started in the food service industry? [chuckle] 02:29 RC: Well, I started at the ripe old age of 15 and a half. Back in those days you could get a motorcycle license and get a permit at school that would allow you to work. And so, I took my first job as a dishwasher at a group called Lord Charlies, which was part of the C&C organization. And I really enjoyed working in the restaurant environment, it was much like in athletics, very much a team style environment, and so it just stuck. I stayed in the restaurant business my entire career. 03:14 DM: That\'s great. What do you think are some of the best qualities that one can get from working in the restaurant industry? 03:23 RC: Well, it\'s one of those things that you don\'t get taught in school. In today\'s public school system, most of what you learn is through reading and memorization. And actually in the work environment, particularly in restaurants, what you learn is team or collaboration in solving problems and working together. And that\'s something that, I think, most athletes enjoy. There\'s no one in team, there\'s just the group as a whole that participates to achieve high-end results. And as a leader, that\'s mostly what we do as leaders is organize teams to strategize to best deliver a customer experience, and not something that one person can do in a restaurant or a contract food service environment. We really need to operate with team to get results. 04:28 DM: I worked myself in the restaurant business for many years, and when I first got started at a very young age I never really thought what I could really learn from this and how that can help me later on in life. Going in there I\'m like, \"Oh, I got this job and I gotta wash dishes and clean floors and serve people.\" But like you say, the valuable lessons that that can teach you to work in a team, to be efficient, customer first, there\'s no other place that the customer is first more like in the restaurant business. You screw something up there, they\'re coming to your place to have an experience. So, yeah, I value a lot of what you say about... There\'s a lot of team building in the restaurant business itself. 05:15 RC: I read a restaurant staff from the Restaurant Association that reported that over 50% of the citizens in this country have worked in a restaurant at one point in time or another. And I think that really bodes well for the hospitality that is important in every business. Customer service is essential no matter what type of business you\'re in. I think most of us cut our teeth in the restaurant business, which is the epitome of the intimate fellowship with other people. Sharing a meal is something that we\'ve been doing as Americans for a long time. 05:54 AS: Yeah, absolutely, as people continue to get lost in their phones, that opportunity for social interaction and learning those skills is important. But in prepping for the episode and doing some research, what about that experience you had gained, made you believe that it was possible to go out on your own? 06:14 RC: C&C Organization was where I first cut my teeth, and I was in [06:21] ____. But I went on from there and worked for a number of other restaurant groups, including Red Baron and Taco Bell, a couple others, but I did work for a company called Seafood Broiler, where right out of high school, I was hired in the... And we grew that restaurant group from six restaurants when I joined, to, I think, 32, and that\'s the company that in fact, we did sell to Red Lobster. And during that time... You know, I mean I love my job, I was recognized as one of the the best leaders in the organization, and never thought twice about changing companies or moving on. 07:09 RC: But when the company decided to sell, ACCOR sold to Red Lobster, and it was kind of a turning point for me, where either I could, A, start over and prove myself to the new management team that was operating the restaurants, or it was an opportunity to start fresh and not face that threat again of having somebody buy out the group. And so, the decision was quite clear at the time and so I started looking for opportunities to open my first restaurant, drew up a business plan, raised the capital, and what can I say, that the rest is history. I was fortunate enough that the first restaurant I opened was a success, and that was in October 19th of 1989 and that restaurant is still successful to this day. 08:08 DM: Yeah, that\'s amazing. So just to kind of get a timeframe, that was right around 1988 or so? 08:20 RC: It was October of 1989. October 19th, 1989 was our first day of operations at Market Broiler in Riverside. 08:28 DM: Very interesting. And out of curiosity, has much changed in regards to how you define and set up a location for a restaurant, its menu? For some of our listeners here, that may be wanting to open a restaurant, what\'s been some of the changes from when you\'ve done that, to now, of what it really takes to start a restaurant? 08:57 RC: That\'s funny that you ask that question. A lot\'s changed. 09:02 AS: I\'m sure. 09:02 RC: Simultaneously, some things never change. What doesn\'t change is the value proposition of what a restaurant offers. The ambience, the quality of the food, the service, the cleanliness of the restaurant, the entire value proposition. When it gets to the point of reaching an art, and that\'s when the culinary experience is at its best. People know a great value when they see it. And they through word-of-mouth, flock to a restaurant that provides those things. And typically my experience has been, is when you do a good job, there\'s typically a margin there. 09:54 RC: On the other hand, what\'s changed is the economy of restaurants. And I think the biggest change that I\'ve seen in my career is the moving away of full service, or full service casual restaurants or full service restaurants at large and the shrinking of that marketplace, and the movement towards fast casual restaurants, and the reason is, one is price, it\'s a lot less expensive to operate and the prices at fast casual restaurants that don\'t have full service is more of a value. But second, the hurrying of America, everybody is so busy. The convenience of getting better quality food than you would get in fast food in these fast casual restaurants has really caused an explosion in America of these type of restaurants. 10:57 AS: Yeah. And you\'d add in the Uber Eats and all that, that you can get it delivered to your house while you\'re driving on the way home, it\'s nuts, it really changes the dynamic of the customer and the restaurant experience. 11:11 DM: Yeah, what advice could you give on staying on top of those trends, as Yelp comes into the fold and social media, and all that stuff that plays a role in any businesses, but especially in the food service industry? 11:25 RC: Without speaking to it specifically, I would say that any leader needs to be looking at organizational change as something that they have to accept and adopt. Every organization is constantly changing and the restaurant industry is no exception to that. You have to adopt changes and stay relevant, and if you don\'t, you\'re out of business. 11:55 DM: Yeah, absolutely. And I wanna kinda shift gears a little bit and talk more about provider, \'cause in our research and heard a little bit about what you guys are doing there. I mean, my experience in college, I remember my parents buying me a food plan and going to the cafeteria and they\'d get no refund at the end of the year if I didn\'t use all of the plan. So we\'ve been going to the convenience store that you can use your meal plan for and loading up on cases of water and Gatorade and snacks, and all sorts of things. And there is a McDonald\'s you could use it for that would just be treating friends to food because like I said, it wasn\'t going back to my parents or anything, or who knows where that money was going? And what you guys are doing with your contract food service operation sounds like it\'s looking to change all that. 12:52 RC: Yeah. The Contract Food Service Division was something that I tripped into, if you will. I was a member of the board of directors of a large church in the Riverside market, and there was a movement in the mega church movement to incorporate food service. And so my pastor asked me, \"Hey would you consider running the food service operation here and leading it?\" My first response was, \"No, that\'s not why I go to church, to work. I go to church to worship.\" But after I thought about it, I was really convicted. If not you Rodney, then who? And so I decided that I would lead the charge, and that... But it was important to me to memorialize the contractual agreement in which we were more of a steward over the program as opposed to a contractor. And you might think that that\'s a subtle difference, but to me it\'s not subtle at all. I don\'t think that universities or businesses should be bifurcating the responsibility and letting a contractor determine food prices, food quality, service, operating hours, all of those things that are important; aesthetics, to a well-run food service operation. 14:29 RC: So what I did that was a little bit disruptive is I organized a contract where in collaboration with the leader of this particular church, we, together chose and decided on, what was best practices for that particular business? And things worked out fairly well. We were earning a fee for doing what we know how to do, which is to, well, run restaurants. And the clients that we were serving were getting first class, best of breed restaurant practices. And so, that morphed into a collegiate account called Cal Baptist University, and we were brought on to alter the trajectory of the current food service that was operated by one of the big contract food service companies in America, Sodexo. And so they hired us and I basically deployed the same model for them, and we\'ve seen, over the last 15 years, this university has grown from less than 2000 folks on campus to over 10,000 folks on campus. And the food service budget is 15 times what it was, instead of operating one outlet, we\'re operating nine outlets with three additional outlets coming online in the next year, year and a half. 16:05 RC: And so it\'s just really been an exciting time for me because I get to exercise my gifts and hospitality in a way that helps strategically the university accomplish its long-term goals of attraction of new students and retention of students. And we were fortunate enough this year and in the last few years, to be rated second best in California and I think seventh or eighth best in the country for the type of program that we\'re operating. And all that with the university really controlling the cost of what program they wanna offer. And that\'s just been exciting to be able to serve them and accomplish the things that we\'ve accomplished together, has just been very rewarding for me. 17:02 AS: So to go from zero to hero for an industry that seems like it\'s already pretty well established, what are some of the big differences that your program has versus the others? 17:19 RC: Well, I think one of the differences is clearly the perspective that we bring to large contract food service accounts. In retail, it\'s every guest every time. In the contract arena, that sentiment is not always every guest every time. And so, bringing this retail mentality of just doing a great job with each and every guest, and you\'re only as good as that last meal that you serve, that\'s really structurally helped us in the contract food service arena, because typically in the contract arena, it\'s not operated to the degree that we operate in the retail sector. I think that\'s one of the big differentials for us, is just the level of hospitality service quality that we serve to each and every guest in the contract business. 18:24 DM: That\'s great. And I\'m sure going into this new arena with provider has helped in the other side of the business too, you flex muscles a little differently. Maybe even just in the relationships you have with your vendors. I\'m sure it\'s helped you grow everything just using like I said, flexing new muscles and thinking about things from a slightly different perspective. 18:48 RC: And that\'s probably another point of differentiation. What we\'ve gleaned in this business is that the competitors that we operate with, in the contract arena, they\'re certainly not as transparent with the financial information as our model has proven to be. And so there\'s a lot of learning that takes place with our clients, in terms of what is best practices, what is your actual food cost, what are labor costs? We manage those things in the retail environment because we must, in order to be successful, we have to keep control over each and every cost of operating a restaurant, \'cause there\'s just... There\'s not that much margin in restaurants. 19:44 RC: So when we activate those costs in the contract arena, it delivers the same type of results that we deliver in the retail sector. But again, one of those differences is that not all the large contractors disclose what their real costs are to their clients. So we found that in meeting with new clients, oftentimes the most negotiated part of the discussion is about price. We try to take price out of the equation by building a contract that gives us what we call our stewardship management fee, and then by sharing with 100% traceability and transparency what the costs are, the risk is taken out in regards to price. So we spend majority of our time with our clients talking about best practices, how to achieve strategic results, as opposed to incessantly negotiating price each and every day we serve them. 20:55 DM: Yeah, I think transparency really is one of the strongest tools businesses can have and it\'s way underused because the world we live in today with social media, phone chat, email, they have so much access to your business, for brands to be transparent upfront and with their customers, helps build that trust that is what gets you loyal customers. 21:16 AS: Yeah, I\'ve been reading a lot about how businesses can clarify their company message and how to be customer-centric, and the two main things that they do focus on is people buy not what they think is the best, but what they understand the best, that is gonna solve their problem. So there may be two competing services, one works way better, but the other one explains it better, the person is more likely to buy that one, \'cause they clearly understand what they\'re getting into, the value proposition cost and so forth. And the other main thing was, people don\'t really worry about price, what they\'re worried about is being played. So it seems like you guys have the perfect recipe of setting the customer upfront, being transparent, clear. And by doing that, that shows the success that you\'re having. So, yeah. Congratulations. That\'s awesome. 22:11 RC: Well, thanks. Trust is not something that\'s easily earned in the environment that we currently live in. We\'re a fallen people and so none of us are perfect and so many of us have been abused and taken advantage of, and it\'s certainly like that in the business environment. Profit is not a bad word, but it does and can be abused by vendors and contractors, and so people are very suspect. So that\'s one of the core initiatives that I have when dealing with customers, is that we needed to earn, earn their trust, and that doesn\'t happen overnight, but it can happen. And when it does happen, you find yourself in a very collaborative relationship, all strategically shooting for goals that your client has, in regards to their overall business and their core competence. And while as stewards, we use our core competence to deliver the type of program that best suits their needs. 23:26 AS: Yeah, definitely. And so what\'s next for you, guys? Is it more restaurants and expansion and getting more schools for the contract food service? Is there bigger ideas in the works? 23:38 RC: No, I think it\'s stay on the continuum that we\'re on, operate where we operate best, which is in the hospitality sector, certainly, we want to grow both the retail and contract food service components. We think that it\'s really important to have both. We like cutting the teeth of our leadership in the retail sector, and then moving those leaders into the contract food service arena, where each and every guest experience is extremely important, that\'s working really well for us, and I think it\'s worked for quite a few contract food service companies historically, some of the best have been incubated in the retail sector, where every meal, every time is critical. 24:33 AS: Yeah. I think that\'s great. You guys are clearly on to something and it\'s working, so congratulations and keep up the good work. Wanna thank you for spending time to talk with us today. 24:45 RC: Well, thanks a lot for your time, that was fun. 24:47 AS: Thanks everyone for listening and we\'ll catch you next time, bye guys.


Read More
6 Email Trends In 2019 No One Is Talking About

6 Email Trends In 2019 No One Is Talking About

Beyond • January 4, 2019

We’ve already come a long way since the beginning days of emails. Customers are starting to perceive branded emails as not so much a nuisance, but a chance to learn more about their favorite companies and the industry overall, as well as an opportunity to read content that actually interests them. As we head into 2019, brands will be working towards improving their emails in all sorts of ways, such as using Gifs and the continuation of eye-grabbing subject lines. While these are a couple of the more common themes we’ll see in the upcoming year, here are 7 email trends to look for in 2019 that not as many people are talking about. Implementing Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is taking over. Don’t worry, not in a catastrophic I, Robot kind of way, but certainly within our digital marketing efforts. Email is certainly one avenue that will be seeing some new, revolutionary artificial intelligence measures being put forward. While the main reason for some businesses, particularly smaller ones, not having put AI into their emails is due to the cost, many companies are starting to invest in artificial intelligence for their marketing. Here are the ways in which AI will be involved with email in 2019 Coming up with subject lines and images Customize content for an individual user by looking at past interactions with other emails Estimating when users may unsubscribe to emails Provide additional insights on engagement and look for potential solutions to issues Automation: Increasing Segmentation It is not a secret that highly personalized and segmented emails do better than those that are not. According to HubSpot, adding personalization elements to your subject lines (such as city and name) will increase the open rate by 20%. Going further, that same HubSpot article cited that emails that are segmented and targeted account for roughly 58 percent of all earnings. The fact of the matter is that email marketing is becoming more intricate, and in 2019, you can anticipate more and more companies working towards automating the segmentation Here are the ways in which Automation will be used in email for 2019 Keeping track of open rates for specific customers and optimize by cutting out those who do not engage in with emails Looking at which content leads to website traffic from emails Curate nurture emails that to push customers towards engagement Less Hard Selling We are shifting further and further away from the ‘hard sell’ in emails, and in 2019 we will continue to see businesses move away from this approach. And it couldn’t have come sooner enough. Hard sell emails are rarely successful, and if you can provide Here are the ways in which less hard selling content will help with emails in 2019: Less unsubscribes from your customers Reduce the feeling of spammy emails JetBlue spiced up their email marketing by avoiding hard sells and instead incorporating an ‘anniversary email’ that highlights the positives of the relationship between JetBlue and their consumers. More Storytelling in Content So, if there is going to be less hard sell content on emails, what will be seeing more of exactly? That’s where storytelling takes over. Storytelling content is an effective means of grabbing your customer’s attention by engaging them – we build storytelling into every project as we do Medical SEO, and no matter what kind of marketer you are, it’s crucial to connecting emotionally to ideal clients. Your goal should be to get every one of your email subscribers to open up every single one of the emails you send them. Seems a bit ambitious right? Good. Storytelling content will improve emails by: Offering meaningful and powerful stories that are focused on your customer’s pain points Further the connection between consumer and brand Provide value for the reader Reduce the ‘spam’ connotations with brand emails Patagonia consistently talks about how they’re company works towards environmental sustainability throughout their marketing efforts, including their emails. Additional Personalization Branching off of the segmentation point, emails in 2019 will further the trend of personalized emails. Imagine you’re an outdoor apparel company. Through your email database and information, you can pick out everyone in your subscriber list who bought a ski suit. Then, you can tailor the content they receive to be associated with skiing. Your subscribers would certainly appreciate opening up emails and reading content that is highly personalized to their interests. Additional personalization in emails will help in 2019 by: -Helping curate content that your customers actually want to receive -Increase open rates of emails -Help establish your brand as one that listens to the needs of their consumers Spotify is the king of personalization, which includes their emails. Writing in Conversational Tones People like to engage with other people, not some run-of-the-mill corporate sounding email blurbs. Your emails need to be distinctive and creative so that they resonate with subscribers. In 2019, we’ll see more brand working towards throwing in personality and humor into their email copy to help create that connection with their audience, as well as to get them to read the entire copy rather than bouncing right after they open it. Obviously, tailor the tonality of your copy to your target market. For example, if you’re a company in the financial sector, you can still have fun with the content, but make sure you’re still serious about serious topics. Conversational tones will improve email in 2019 by: Connecting with the audience Increasing email engagement Help push your brands as one that is personable Chubbies has positioned themselves as a brand for the care-free and those who like to kick back and have a beer or two. And their chill, conversational emails help further convey this feeling. I for one am personally very excited to see where the future of email marketing is heading. If you’re looking to increase open rates, conversions, and the overall satisfaction of your customers, then make sure that you try and implement these email marketing strategies!


Read More
Top Effective Email Marketing Strategies That Will Boost Your Sales in 2019

Top Effective Email Marketing Strategies That Will Boost Your Sales in 2019

Beyond • November 19, 2018

Boosting sales is a key to success, and effective marketing strategies are a key to boosting sales. Learn about the most potentially effective innovative email marketing strategies recommended as core shots for the upcoming 2019. This article aims to identify the most perspective email marketing strategies to be employed for boosting the revenue of a company in the next business year via highlights of triggers of their potential. The strategies will be discussed in terms of the main trends and priorities of the modern world of digital marketing. Triggering Headlines to Be Honored and Employed Are you still in a doubt whether headlines can trigger your sales? The Return On Investment (ROI) on email marketing is, on average, 38:1. That means you can earn $38 for every $1.00 spent. No more doubts now, right? Awesome, cause we have a list of working tips for you to add this tool to effective daily use. Every perspective of response starts with the first words a receiver sees. As a rule, it is a headline in the context of email marketing. Having trouble with a headline is not a failure, but a high time to learn the strategy: be concise, be flamboyant, mean it. Do not overwhelm a reader with information – headlines are to attract attention, not to give every single detail. Triggering headline leads to reading further, which means that it should refer to the reader’s needs, values, or current emotions. Actually, it is emotions that are responsible primarily for the interaction with the target audience. Once a constructive reference to emotions is implemented in a message of the headline, it is easier to engage the target audience. The potential use of the following email is another substantial power that should be incorporated in the headline if there is a real benefit in the message, in particular, and the offer, in general: It is also crucial to literally imply what a headline says: there will be no efficiency if headlines have no actions or quality behind them. One more important aspect of a functional headline is that it should not be excessively long. There is no need to build a complete sentence, but a phrase should evoke emotions and create a particular impression, scene, or atmosphere. As a rule, creating an atmosphere implies invitation for a person in a world that atmosphere embodies, and people love being invited to a different reality or being offered an alternative to something they already have or have already experienced. Emotions mean new experiences and opportunities in the given context, whereas basically every offer is a promise. Make this promise concise and tempting by answering the following question: would this headline trigger my own interest? Several examples of working headlines are here for you: Stating the Obvious: Constructive Analysis vs Personal Opinion in the Ar No Sales – Justified, yet Affordable Prices only The Art of Being Persuasive and Efficient Religious Matters: Believing in or Following the Schedule. Welcome Interactive Emails to Regular Use Interactivity in terms of email sent with a business-oriented purpose implies engagement, participation, different kinds of activity from a receiver. Interactive triggers that can be employed in such emails involve swiping, tapping, or responding to the content provided. These activities vary from clicking a button to actual instant purchase or subscription. Some businesses prefer only informing their customers via emails, whereas others make a real profit due to the given marketing tool. Apparently, the latter case is an example of big corporations with a well-known name and crystal clean reputation when it comes to quality and integrity issues. If a company is newly born or is not recognized widely, it is recommended to employ informative and entertaining e-mails so as to avoid pressuring the target audience with constant claims to buy or visit since such patterns can result in unsubscribing or even blocking the sender. It is crucial to choose the type of interaction that will be perceived as a comfortable and suitable one for the target audience, not a burdening or annoying kind of interaction. Interaction should be presented in the light form: not an obligation, but an entertainment since customers strive to have fun above all the rest. Entertainment comes first, and only then being informed and curiosity appear on the radar. Take a look: “91% of B2B buyers prefer to consume interactive and visual content.” Once this is established, let us underline some crucial aspects: Build your brand on inspiration and vividness, and make sure emails are no different: We strongly recommend using innovative techniques such as digital scratch cards or offering a fun deal (nothing complicated or creepy, just a game): Personalizing every message will get you profits, loyal customers, and reputation. The examples of such interaction in e-mails are as follows: It makes the impression that this particular email is addressed directly to me. People, tend to react better when they see their names. Video Content: How to Make a Difference Video captures attention immediately, it is known. As Biteable claims, people prefer watching videos to reading texts, especially when those are long ones. The ultimate secret of effective videos used all over the profitable companies is as follows: it is crucial to make an impactful, vivid image that triggers interests and simultaneously appeals in terms of esthetics, and link it to the video. The visual element can surprise people, make them smile or wonder, in any case, the main task here is to enter the emotional area of the target audience. Again. Experts recommend mentioning the word “video” in the subject line, keep this subject line sweet and short, and remember about viral qualities necessary for success in this domain. Apart from it, do not make mysterious assumptions or vague suggestion: the call to action should be impeccably clear. Nevertheless, sending an excellent video with an attractive visual basic element is not enough. We recommend placing this video as a central element within a bigger context. Remember: you do not want the text to be too long and your message – too redundant. Just put some highlights and outline core points of what it’s all about. Concerning the impeccably clear call to action, emails from Jobs for Editors tend to have it: No Hints to Spam: Natural and Effective Spam is the worst threat to your business in terms of digital marketing one could have ever imagined. First of all, it is necessary to avoid all the spam words that can be recognized as spam. It is strongly recommended to steer clear of conventional phrases marking it is a matter of business offer sent to numerous receivers. Spam is one thing when it is recognized by the system and quite another one when a receiver marks it as one. Therefore, do everything possible in order to gain and sustain the loyalty of the target audience. A visual aspect is also important in the given context. To be more precise, it is recommended to pick a particular color and font for your brand so as to make it recognizable and distinguish it from the pile of other emails aiming to conquer attention of the target audience: A piece of alarming statistics: an average person tends to receive approximately 88 e-mails per day. Impressive, right? Remember that branding your e-mails is like branding your products or services: it may look like a small aspect right now, but it will repay you in the long run significantly. Make sure that both chosen font and color are relevant to your mission, vision, positioning and values. It is important in the world of business to make a holistic impression. Words triggering spam status to be avoided include “buy,” “order,” “order status,” “scores,” “stakes,” “additional income,” “beneficiary,” “be your own boss,” “cash,” “work at home,” “make $ while you sleep,” “cheap,” “credit,” “insurance,” “price,” “profits,” etc Infographics as It Is in Email Marketing A call to action is your major weapon for email marketers. You may already know that. What you might not know is that a traditional point for placing your call to action, namely, the end of the letter, is often a major reason of e-mail’s failure, especially when there are two or more sections in the letter. An optimal solution for this dilemma is to have a call to action for each section. One more thing about emails with several sections: you need to mark them appropriately and vividly. It does not mean that you should use multiple colors, fonts or images – no way, that is a definite taboo. A smart way to mark different sections for reader’s convenience is to use constructive icons. Requirements to those icons: they should reflect the theme of the section, have a consistent style, and be smartly structured. Black and white colors are a classic solution provided you are in a serious business niche or do not want to mess with multicolored content. Nevertheless, classic is not always a go. Try using an unconventional layout since this will both distinguish your email from others and at the same time will increase chances to draw the attention of a receiver to the headlines of sections. In such a way, there will be more chances to interest him or her and engage. Finally, a template is a smart decision in terms of infographics. Approximately 80% of the receivers tend to only skim the letter, not read it thoroughly. Hence, an infographic can become your advantage for catching their attention at first and sustaining the interest further on. Here is an example of a smart infographic:   We wish you good luck in battles located in the area of digital marketing. Be smart, be concise, and be consistent!


Read More
1 2 3 4 39