Series Posts: Clueless Email Marketer?!

Interns Ask Us Questions About Growing a List

Interns Ask Us Questions About Growing a List

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 10, 2018

We made our interns listen to the first nine episodes on growing a list and then told them to ask us any questions that came up. After all, they\'re the resident Clueless Email Marketers in our office. 00:22 Andy Shore: Hey, everybody, welcome back to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer. We have a special episode for you today. We have our interns here with Daniel and I, and since they are the clueless email marketers in our office, our resident clueless email marketers, we figured we\'d force them to listen to the first nine episodes and then see how Daniel and I did, if we covered anything, if it raised more questions with you guys, or if we\'re geniuses and our job is done, but we know we\'re not, so we expect you guys to have questions. You can say \"hi\" and introduce yourselves, if you guys like. 01:00 Zach Morita: Hey, how\'s it going? I\'m Zach, thanks for having me. [chuckle] 01:03 Milena Saradinova: And... Oh, my God. [laughter] Hi, I\'m Milena. 01:07 AS: Milena is nervous, and she\'ll be fine. [laughter] Daniel and I were more worried she is gonna ask us too hard of questions. 01:16 Daniel Miller: Yeah, we were very worried about that. [overlapping conversation] [laughter] 01:22 AS: So, how did we do? What\'d you guys think of the first nine episodes? 01:25 ZM: I thought they were pretty good, very informative. You guys really broke it up into easy to understand parts. 01:30 MS: Yeah. It was easy even for us to understand, how to build our lists if we were starting fresh. 01:38 AS: You guys don\'t have to say that, you\'ll get your college credits. [laughter] 01:43 DM: Was there something in there that you had no idea that existed and you\'re like, \"Oh, that\'s pretty cool. I had no idea I could do that\"? 01:52 ZM: I\'m not too sure about that, but I like the strategies that you guys talked about. I would have never thought of print ads or anything, \'cause these days everything is digital. 02:00 DM: Millennials. 02:02 ZM: Yeah, exactly, right? 02:04 AS: They\'re younger than millennials. We\'re the millennials. [overlapping conversation] [laughter] 02:11 DM: So, what\'s your first question? Hit us. 02:13 ZM: You guys talked about a lot of things that are happening in present time. Do you guys foresee any future trends happening under new technologies, or just new things you can do with emails, other things you can add to them? 02:25 DM: There was a certain... There was this app, I think it was called Bump. And what it was is... The whole thing of cards is kind of in the past. I have business cards, but I got a feeling when I give that to someone, they throw it away 10 seconds afterwards. The people that really care, they\'ll take a picture of it. There\'s an app, I think it was Bump. I think when the iPhone 3GS was out, or something like that, it allowed two people with the iPhone to bump them and it would automatically share their contact details. 02:54 AS: Yeah, I remember that. 02:55 DM: So, I\'m hoping for more of that to evolve in some way, for app developers and the phone companies to try to figure out a way to sync it, because only iPhone users could do that. If it was Android, there was a lot of conflict that would barely ever work. Technologies like QR code and apps like Bump, I\'m hoping for those to evolve more as business cards become more and more obsolete. 03:19 ZM: Yeah, it\'s crazy. 03:20 AS: Yeah, I don\'t know what I... Maybe something with voice, in terms of growing your list, \'cause voice search is continuing to grow and people are having to optimize their websites to have phrases like people would talk, that there might be something in the voice space, like an app to grow your list or something with how that integrates to make it easier though. I don\'t know how Siri understands me half the time, and she doesn\'t the other half. But I think that\'s a possibility, if I\'m just guessing. [laughter] 03:52 ZM: No, absolutely. I\'m like, I can\'t tell the future, but, yeah, that\'d be interesting to see. 03:56 DM: Milena, do you have any questions? 03:58 MS: You guys have a lot of good tips on how to grow your list, but let\'s say someone has tried them all and nothing really worked for them. What advice do you have for them, and... I don\'t know, if they\'re feeling discouraged about it, do you have any words of encouragement and what do you guys do? 04:15 AS: Shut down shop. [laughter] I think you have to look at yourself at that point and realize that, are you going after your core customer? Because if no one\'s signing up, no one\'s joining your list, you might not be going after the right customers, because what you\'re offering, they\'re not interested in, and you might not be offering either a good enough incentive or good enough content. It could be that your sign-up form doesn\'t tell them the amazing things they could get, or offer a free e-book or something or other for signing up, or once they get the newsletters, they don\'t like what they\'re getting, and so they\'re unsubscribing and your list isn\'t gonna grow. But I think there are very specific reasons that\'s happening. I don\'t think anyone who\'s doing the right things and the right strategies in the right places is gonna find that happen. But if you are, I think you really gotta look inward at that point. 05:06 DM: Yeah. I think what Andy is saying is absolutely right. It\'s really easy to bring people to your site, really, really easy. To bring the right people to your site is the complicated part. And just to give you a personal example with Benchmark Email, our traffic spiked, but signups didn\'t really go up. And we\'re curious, \"What the heck is going on?\" And when we looked at Google Analytics and we saw where this traffic was coming from, an FAQ that we had, which was how to export your contacts from Hotmail, was driving, I think it was like, 50% of all of our traffic overnight. It just started growing like crazy. When we looked into this, Hotmail had been sold to Microsoft and was shutting down Hotmail, and everyone was trying to look for how to export their contacts. So, our FAQ was rising like crazy \'cause it was a really well-explained, step-by-step process on how to do that, but, of course, none of these people will... Not none of them, but the majority were just looking to export their contacts. They weren\'t looking to sign up for the email software. 06:07 DM: So, our traffic spiked, but our number of signups didn\'t spike. If somebody is trying to grow their list, and they see that they tried all of these tips that we\'ve given and nothing\'s working, are they writing the right message? Like what you\'re saying, are they... On that signup form, is it informative enough to what they\'re signing up for? Could it be better explained? Could there be more of a history behind that? There\'s a ton of different things that I would look into to fix that. But, yeah, I think it would be more on the message getting across and connecting with the core customer than the strategy itself. 06:41 MS: So, what has worked best for you guys to finding your core customer and engaging with them? 06:47 DM: Oh, that\'s funny that you say that. It\'s actually... We tried doing... We were following this book called \"Inside Advantage\" to really try to identify who our core customer is. We got a lot of the company involved in really trying to figure this out, from our sales and support reps, all the way to the top to our CEO. And we had a core customer in mind, which we thought was a really good fit. And just recently, actually, we went back and we\'ve updated that a little bit slightly to adjust more to who are core customers. And, I\'m sorry, but what was the question again? [laughter] I was rambling off. 07:26 AS: What\'s worked for us to grow the list. 07:29 MS: And engage with the right customer, not just with any... As you were saying, not everyone is important... 07:34 DM: That\'s great. Okay, that it is. What\'s worked for us to grow our list specifically for core customers, really understanding who it is that uses our service, and understanding what they use of our service, meaning there\'s email marketers that are gonna go in, and unless you have a very powerful marketing automation tool, they\'re not even gonna take a look at your service. We noticed that we were getting a lot of people sending out simple newsletters, just keeping a constant communication with the subscribers on a regular basis, but nothing really too complicated. So, we made sure to adjust our language on our site to adapt to those people, meaning we would avoid, in a way, using the word \"automation,\" \'cause our core customer, they would be scared off by that word. But maybe later on after they\'ve been using our product for some time, we would then maybe introduce this as something new to them, and start very, very simple and say, \"Hey, try this welcome email strategy,\" and so forth. So, really the biggest thing, I think, that we\'ve done is change our language to really adapt to what our core customer is looking for. 08:39 AS: Yeah. And another thing I\'d say is that one thing that I found incredibly valuable in understanding our customers is getting out from behind a computer and talking to people face-to-face. If you\'re strictly in the e-commerce space or you\'re a SAS product, digital marketing, all that stuff, there\'s really no need, in theory, for you to ever talk to somebody face-to-face. It\'s all on the phone, email, chat, whatever that might be. But Daniel and I started going to events and working the booth for Benchmark and getting to talk to actual business owners and walking them through the process, and time and again having them say, \"Well, I don\'t need email marketing,\" but then being able to talk to them about their business and give them two, three different tips, things they could do with email marketing and see those moments where the light bulb turned on, there\'s really no replacing that. 09:27 AS: So, finding those opportunities to really look your customer in the eye and talk to them and get to know them and their needs and how they wanna use your tools, not how you want them to use your tools, that was huge for us. I\'m the copywriter for the company and I\'m running all our content, so it\'s made me better at that job in delivering more valuable, relevant content, just by talking to them face-to-face, and getting to understand that, I think that\'s helped grow our list as well. 09:56 MS: I guess the main takeaway from this is that know your customer and figure out the best language to really reach them, would be another tip to add. 10:05 AS: Totally. 10:06 DM: Exactly. Back in the day, let\'s just say 10 years ago, or 20, it was as easy as just creating an ad that showcases how you solve a problem. That\'s it. As long as you had a product that solved a problem, people would buy it. Now, there are so many competitors, and no matter what industry you\'re in, competitors come up overnight. People are really looking for products and services that speak their same language. I think there\'s over 100 email marketing platforms out there. Benchmark Email doesn\'t attract everybody. We attract somebody that when they come to our site, they went, \"Oh, this company gets me. They understand my problem. And not only that, they\'ve created tools and support to help me solve this problem in the way that I understand it.\" Versus, if they go to a competitor, they may say, \"Oh, this is too confusing,\" or, \"It\'s too fast for me,\" or, \"It\'s too slow,\" whatever that is. 11:00 ZM: Yeah. So, you guys try to keep it simple with your guys\' interface and everything, it seems to work out? 11:05 DM: Exactly, yeah. We tend to think that our core customer is a time shaft owner or manager, that really they\'re juggling a few things, their social media, their PPC ads, their landing pages, and email marketing is just one of those things. So, we know that time is super important. They don\'t have hours and hours to spend there, so we wanna make sure that our workflow and our process is as simple as it can be, so someone can go in and out in less than 15 minutes. 11:34 AS: Yeah, a few years ago, we made coffee mugs. The design was like a barometer, and as soon as you were two or three sips in from the coffee, you were done with your email and you can move on with your day and do everything else you had to do. It was just like, you don\'t need to worry about spending all your time here. We know that both marketers and business owners have to wear a lot of hats these days, even just the marketing space, every aspect of it, but some business owners don\'t get to be just marketing. They\'re marketing and sales and support, and everything else, so to be able to do it quickly and effectively is really important. 12:10 MS: You didn\'t go into... When you have your list, what do you do? How do you keep that engagement? How do you get people to open your emails? How do you get them engaged with your content, and let\'s say you\'re sending all these emails, but you don\'t get any response? 12:26 AS: Sure. It starts with the open rate. If they\'re not opening your emails, maybe your \"from name\" isn\'t familiar to them, maybe you\'re using a person in the company instead of your brand name, and they might not know it\'s you sending the emails, and that might be an issue, or your subject line isn\'t very good or not interesting or enticing enough to get them to open the email, or you didn\'t use the preview text that gets a little extra shot in there, trying to grab their attention and beam that teaser that gets the email opened. And then once it\'s opened, if they\'re not clicking through to your website, then it\'s a content issue. And it\'s just trying to pay attention to your reports and identify which level of the problem you\'re facing and working from the top down to improve each one to where the whole funnel is working. 13:14 DM: Yeah. And for this first section that we have for the Clues for the Clueless, we were really focusing on list building first. What you\'re talking about, list engagement, is gonna be part of our next series that we\'re gonna talk into how to build email properly to get the most opens, engagement rate, click-through rate. And revenue, as well, I think, is something that we\'ll definitely tap into. But I do agree with what Andy is saying. One thing to really keep in mind, separate... I\'m kinda getting ahead of our self now since we\'re gonna be covering this next week, but as a preview, as a snippet here for us, when you\'re looking at your email performance, people tend to do what Andy just said now. If you see a problem with your open rate, just play with the subject line and your \"from name\" and the preview name, let\'s say. That\'s technically true, but at the same time, similar to the traffic, it is very easy to get opens. If I say in my email \"$300 gift card to Amazon,\" I may get a lot of opens. But then if the content has nothing to do with that, I\'m really shooting myself in the foot, I\'m creating a bad taste in the mouth for my subscriber, and I\'m creating a sense of distrust. They\'re not gonna trust me anymore. 14:26 DM: So what\'s important is look at those step-by-step, the open, the click, on the email, how long they stay on the email, did they click to get to your site, to get an overall sense, but always keep in mind what is the message that you\'re trying to send. Maybe the open rate that you have for the message you\'re sending is through the roof, because not all of your subscribers are technically interested in that. And instead of trying to say, \"My strategy sucks,\" maybe try to go back and say, \"How can I further segment this to make the messages more relevant to each of the buckets or each of the type of people that I may have on my list?\" Again, we\'ll get into that in the next series. 15:01 AS: Just to add to what Daniel was saying about opens are easy to get, you\'ll also have the neurotic subscribers like me who are just like can\'t handle having push notifications on their phones, so I\'ll open and X out of an email immediately just so it\'s not... The push notification isn\'t there anymore. And so that open has no value either. But I wanna ask you guys a couple of questions, as long as you\'re here. I thought about doing it before, but we\'re not throwing you any curve balls. It\'s about growing your list. What are some newsletters or email lists you guys subscribed for recently or have you ever subscribed for an email list? 15:38 ZM: Me, personally, I do. Sometimes when I shop, like clothing companies, or something, something that catches my eyes, like \"20% off now,\" or things like that, something that\'s in it for me. 15:48 MS: I do like those retail ones too, like when you sign up for their newsletter, you get some percentage off of your next purchase or something like that. And I also am interested in marketing, so I do subscribe to the Ad Age newsletter, and I really like it. They give you the quick updates for this week, and I really like that. I\'ve subscribed to a lot of emails and newsletters, and I\'m really upset about it. I get at least 50 emails a day, and I hated it. That\'s why when I think about email marketing, I\'m like, \"How do you even stand out? I don\'t open most of these.\" I get 50 of those every day. So, it\'s not even about... Even if you\'re subject line is cool, I\'m not going to open it just because I get so many. So, when you guys were talking about how sure you are about the future of email marketing, I was thinking, how can you guys be so sure when our future generation gets so many emails a day and doesn\'t even open one of them? 16:46 AS: Sure. We actually had the Heart of Business a month or two ago, interviewed Chad White, who wrote the Email Marketing Rules, and we asked him a similar question, \"Are email marketers shooting themselves in the foot by sending too many emails? Are people fatigued by crowded inboxes.\" And he pointed out to us readily so, and you even say it yourself, you\'re in marketing and so you subscribe to newsletters and now you get a lot, but that isn\'t necessarily the average user. And people who maybe do a little bit of online shopping, but not all of it... And even if they are un-subscribing, people are used to the noise in the inbox, and Gmail has the tabs and everything to sort it that I don\'t think people are tuned out to this point and, the stats don\'t necessarily show it in terms of what the open rates are, that I think the general average consumer will still be opening emails and being able to interact with that. 17:43 DM: Yeah. No, I agree with that. And that enforces more what I was saying earlier about really focusing not on all of your subscribers, because I think that\'s really something that, in a way, is unrealistic, but really focus on who your core customer is. And inside of that, there\'s another shell inside of that, which is, who\'s ready to buy now or who\'s ready to engage right now. I subscribe to LivingSocial, and all those type of things. They send me an email daily, sometimes two or even three times per day, depending on the season. I don\'t open or buy from every single one of them, but I\'ll tell you what, if I have some PTO that I wanna take off and there\'s an email that pops up at the right time with a trip to Yosemite at 300 bucks for a whole week, I\'m taking that. And if you think about that purchase of $300, that almost pays for the email marketing, for me specifically, for them to send it to me for years to come. So, that\'s how that balances out, I see. 18:41 AS: Yeah. Every podcast, audience won\'t be treated to the skeptical look we got from Milena, that response. 18:46 MS: I\'m just curious, because... [laughter] 18:48 DM: If we can convince her, email marketing has the feature. 18:52 MS: I mean, you guys are just so sure about it. And you even talk about how maybe Facebook will become... Will be gone in a couple of years or something like that, but you sound so sure that email marketing is here to stay. But maybe in the past, people thought that mailing things to people, like flyers and stuff like that, was going to stay with us forever. And it still is happening, but what is the return on investment on that now? I have so much junk mail at home that I don\'t even go through right now. So, do you guys fear that one day email marketing will become obsolete? 19:28 AS: I don\'t know. The answer is no, but I\'m gonna steal Daniel\'s answers with all of this and what I respond to, but communication, in some form, is always gonna be there. Like Daniel said millions of times, there was writing on the walls and caves thousands of years ago, and that\'s how they communicated with people. \"Here\'s what I ate for lunch today,\" painted on the wall of a cave instead of on your Instagram. And so that communication is there, in some form or another. Even if it\'s not email marketing, the ideas of how you communicate with people and engage with your audience to sell to them and to solve problems for them and provide them with value is gonna be there, even if it\'s not email marketing, per se. And I think the company and the space will evolve with that in the natural way and in ways that it\'s not something I worry about because, like you said, junk mail, it\'s still communicating to your audience. It\'s just [20:25] ____ do it might change, but even all the new ones, social media, all that ties back into email. You can\'t sign up for it without an email address, you get notifications in your email. It\'s all still pretty email-based. 20:38 DM: When it comes down to email marketing, I think when it comes down to the channels, how many channels I use to communicate with friends, family, co-workers. To name a few, Slack, WhatsApp, Facebook, Facebook Messenger, \'cause I\'m talking about the Facebook wall versus Facebook Messenger, Instagram, Instagram direct messages, Twitter, Twitter direct messages, LinkedIn, LinkedIn, and these are people... 21:00 AS: Snapchat. 21:00 DM: Snapchat, Face2Face, and these are people that I can just choose one channel and communicate on it. But depending on the type of message, I wanna send it through a different channel. Right? If I wanna do a goofy face for a situation, I may use Snapchat. If it\'s more serious, I don\'t know, type of communication, I may use a different form that... If it\'s more personal, I may do something like WhatsApp or regular text messaging. Again, depending on the channel of communication... I\'m sorry. Depending on what I wanna say, I\'m gonna choose that channel. 21:31 DM: And one thing that I wanna be very clear, I don\'t think anybody should just do email marketing. If you\'re just doing email marketing, you\'re losing out. That\'s just the bottom line. Same thing as if you\'re just doing Facebook, you\'re probably losing out as well, because not everybody likes to receive communications through the same channel. Just how I like to send a message based on what the message is for a specific channel, people also like to receive specific things through certain channels as well. If I send the exact same email on Facebook versus their email, it\'s gonna get a totally different response. I think that\'s why every brand needs to identify what does email mean to them, what is the voice and the type of message that they wanna send through that channel, and how does that correlate with all of the other channels and messages that they\'re sending out? Don\'t duplicate it, don\'t overlap it too much, but you want that consistency surrounding of your subscriber and fans. 22:26 AS: Yeah. Do you have any more hard-hitting questions? [overlapping conversation] 22:29 AS: I\'m not giving you any more opportunity to ask questions. [chuckle] Thanks, everyone, for listening to this very special episode of Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer. And we\'ll catch you next time. Bye, guys. You guys wanna say goodbye to our audience? 22:43 MS: Bye. 22:43 ZM: Yeah. Bye. [laughter] 22:45 DM: So enthusiastic. They\'re so happy to be here. Thanks, everybody. 22:50 MS: But it was fun.


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Growing a List: Print Ads

Growing a List: Print Ads

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 9, 2018

It\'s important to remember every possible touch point when looking to grow your email list. You might not think of print ads as an opportunity to do that, but you\'d be incorrect. With QR codes, SMS or simply putting a URL, you can grow your list with this offline opportunity. 00:23 Andy Shore: Welcome back, everybody. We are continuing our conversation on growing your list and today, it might sound like an archaic way of doing it, but good old-fashioned print ads are a good place to grow your list. Why is that? 00:38 Daniel Miller: Well, as we\'ve been saying throughout the beginning of these series, you wanna be in multiple channels at once, don\'t ever rely on just one channel for your marketing. And at the same time, when it comes down to it, the digital space can be just as congested as any other space, so try to switch it up a bit. When it comes down to print ads, we\'re gonna talk today about a lot of different ways that you can have signup forms, or I guess, an entry point to a signup form on a print ad, and it\'s something that you\'ll be able to use in all of the different methods that we talked earlier, go to trade shows and stuff like that. 01:16 AS: Yeah, it\'s just all about turning all those offline opportunities into digital conversations, because that\'s the way people communicate nowadays. Whether... 01:24 DM: Exactly. 01:25 AS: Grandpa likes it or not, that\'s how it\'s happening. And so we\'re just trying to cover all those possible customer touch points, even the ones that aren\'t necessarily online, where you can turn to to grow your list. So how do you do that when you have a print ad? 01:39 DM: Well, one of the most common ways in this day and age are QR codes. I know they look ugly, I know, trust me. There\'s some companies out there that kinda allow you to play with the QR code, that you can add an image to it, or your logo, or something else, but the real benefit of it is the potential that it has, the speed that it has as well. As we said in one of our earlier episodes, if you have a restaurant, you may wanna put those little flyers on each page with a small, little QR code that somebody could scan and go right there and sign up to your email list. We\'re gonna mention also, you can put a URL, but the problem with the URL is it tends to be long, people can do a typo, they get frustrated, it may not work as well. A QR code, they just have to point their camera to it, and I think every single phone now has a very easy way to access QR codes. The iPhone finally added it to their camera, to where now you just pull out your camera, you point it at the QR code and it will automatically detect that and go straight to that website. So again, it\'s probably one of the easiest ways to have the QR codes. 02:46 AS: Yeah, and that\'s a good point, on highlighting the advantage of that over the good old-fashioned URL. But that other way is, I\'m sure you\'ve seen it a million times is, \"Text subscribe to 4755,\" or something like that, and doing it through SMS also helps avoid those typo issues or the remembering issues, \'cause they can hop on their phone that\'s probably already in their hand, if we\'re being honest, and subscribe to your list quickly and easily, whether that\'s on signage somewhere, in a print ad on a table, in a magazine, in the newspaper, flyers you\'re handing out at events, any of those things that, later, they can... When they pick it out to look at it, they can subscribe very easily. So where should you look for those opportunities like we\'re talking about? 03:29 DM: Magazines on tables, flyers. If you\'re at a trade show and you have pull up banners, you can put it there. If you have a brick and mortar store, little stickers on the window, \'cause don\'t forget, when your store is closed, people may still pass by your store, and it\'s closed now, but if there\'s something that they can get more information from, they\'ll probably scan that and wanna sign up. As a matter of fact, I once saw somebody with a truck. It was a construction thing, I think he was a contractor, and he had a giant QR code on the side of his car, it was just for that, \'cause wherever he parks his contracting car, if somebody wants to learn more about his services and prices and so forth, all they gotta do is scan that code and they\'re in. It really makes it that easy. 04:13 AS: Yeah, and Daniel mentioned those stickers and that reminded me, how many places do you go where you see that sticker out front, find us on Yelp? Or something like that? But that\'s them going to Yelp, but why not bring them to your newsletter or your website with that QR code, where you\'re controlling that conversation rather than it happening in a third party site like Yelp? I think that sticker is a really good point, and like we mentioned before, you\'re doing direct mail ads, flyers, if you\'re giving handouts, or you have one sheets that are good information on your business, throw that QR code or URL for signup, or SMS, so that they can get those follow-ups with you. And I think that\'s it. 04:54 DM: Yeah, I think that\'s it. I hope you guys enjoyed our series of growing list and... Yeah. 05:00 AS: Yeah, to really put a button on growing the list, we\'re gonna make all our interns listen to these first nine episodes, and then they\'re gonna get to ask us questions, because when it comes to email marketing, they\'re still the most clueless ones in the office. I hope you guys hear that. So they\'re all gonna be a little less clueless after listening to this, but we\'re gonna give them a chance to ask us questions and see if we missed anything or left any gaps there. So tune in next time, we appreciate you all listening, we\'re gonna keep going and continue beyond growing your list into all the different timing aspects of growing your list, not just the places you need to be to do it. Thanks for listening, we\'ll catch you next time, bye.


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Growing a List: Events

Growing a List: Events

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 8, 2018

This episode continues our conversation on the off-line options for growing your email list with a look at events. Business events and expos give us an opportunity to interact with all sorts of current and potential customers. Use that to build your list. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, thanks for tuning in. We are continuing our conversation on growing your list, and today\'s topic is events. Daniel and I have gone to small business expos and other events all across this country. We love doing it, we love meeting people, and the conversation can\'t end there at the events. Right, Daniel? 00:43 Daniel Miller: Most definitely. When you\'re at an event, at an expo, at a trade show, at a networking event, whatever that is, your conversations are minimal. You\'re pretty much going right to the point. You get to know each other, meaning your name, your business, the position in the company, how can we help each other, and you immediately say, \"Hey, I do this, you do that. Let\'s exchange business cards and follow up.\" That\'s as far as you really go. Why? Because you don\'t have time to really spend 30 minutes, 45 minutes with each person there. You\'re at a trade show, at a networking event to speed-date throughout, and then do the follow-ups later on. 01:18 DM: So the first main important reason as to why you wanna collect emails, and don\'t just collect the business cards and just add them to your email list, make sure that you ask for permission, whether it\'s right there at the time, saying, \"Hey, do you mind if I add you to my email list?\" You make a little note on the card, or you take all of your business cards from the show and you can put them in and send a one-time email to ask for that permission at that time. But again, the most important reason is to do that follow-up post-event \'cause you just don\'t have time to talk about everything at the event. 01:48 AS: Yeah, and some people are gonna be there just to grab the swag at your table. But they may need what you\'re offering, and so if you get them to sign up and say, \"Hey, we\'re offering a one-time special for all event attendees, that we wanna thank you for stopping by the booth. We\'re gonna follow up and send you that offer,\" that\'s how you\'re gonna get those people that maybe just wanted a free pen or something else that may actually turn into a customer \'cause you were able to capture that email and follow up with them afterward. 02:17 DM: And as a quick bonus one, one of the things that you may do, if you go to events often and you start creating a list of people that you meet at events, they\'re probably gonna be interested about these other events that you go to. So communicating to them regularly, saying, \"Hey, guys, I met you at this event. I\'m gonna be going to this other one. Come join me. It\'s a very similar one, I think you would like it,\" you\'re gonna start creating a different type of engagement to where you\'re no longer just selling yourself, you\'re selling that you are somebody to trust and you are somebody of value because every email you send has value, whether it\'s about your product or something that can benefit that subscriber that you have. 02:54 AS: Definitely. And now that we talked about the why, let\'s get into the how. And if you listen to our in-store episode, you\'ll know that we recommended signage in the store that has either a QR code or a way to contact you via SMS or a URL to go to. But in your booth, you\'ve got signage, you\'ve got banners, you\'ve got the tablecloth. Whatever it is in your booth, there are ample opportunities to let people know that they can sign up for your list. 03:19 DM: Most definitely. I think it\'s one of the most common things. \"Put your business card in here they\'ll win the prize at the end of the day.\" A free tablet or $1000 or whatever that is. A bonus thing for that one, try to think to yourself how much time and how much it costs you to obtain that lead. Think of how many people are gonna go to that event and try to guesstimate how many leads you\'re gonna be able to obtain from the event. That\'s how you can try to quantify how much money to spend on that grand prize. So, having it to where people can just easily pass by. Again, we\'re talking about an event, a trade show, to where if you have a booth, people are just gonna be passing by. You\'re gonna get a lot of looky-loos, those people that are just trying to find the free pens and the free toys for their kids that they\'re looking for, right? 04:09 AS: Or their dogs. 04:10 DM: Exactly. Don\'t discard those people, and make sure that you have a way to obtain their information that follow-up with them through email, to then maybe try to nurture that lead. And a lead that you thought was just passing by trying to get the free stuff may turn into a really good customer. 04:25 AS: Definitely. And it\'s always a good idea that you either maybe have a couple laptops or a desktop or even some tablets that you have there available that you can hand to someone to sign up, that lets you get on to that next person and talk to you while that other person is completing the sign-up process, to where you can really maximize your time there at your booth. And last but not least, I know it\'s gonna sound crazy, but good old-fashioned pen and paper. 04:49 DM: Pen and paper sometimes work the best because it also depends on your audience. A lot of times at events, the Internet works really slow. The WiFi, there are so many people at once that it\'s hard to push that through, and you wanna make sure that you don\'t lose any leads whatsoever. So a lot of times with pen and paper is the good old-fashioned way. It works. Be sure to leave a lot of space when you\'re allowing somebody to fill that out. Don\'t put too many fields. If you can, just put their email. The other information, you could possibly gather later on as you follow up with them, but keep it simple and give them enough space so they don\'t have to cram their writing in. 05:28 AS: Yeah. Don\'t forget, you\'re gonna have to read it all and type it in later. So don\'t pick thinly-lined paper. Those thick lines, to where they have all the space in the world. Remind them to write neatly so you can follow up with them, and that\'s how you\'re gonna keep in touch with your event attendees. 05:45 DM: Quick pro tip: If you\'re using Evernote Pro, you can actually take a picture of your sheet, and it will automatically detect the text for you and put it in a digital version. So, there you go. 05:57 AS: Oh, that is a good tip. Thanks, everyone, for listening. We\'ll catch you next time, where we wrap up our conversation with the last recommendation of places where you should look to to grow your list. Thanks. 06:08 DM: See you next time.


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Growing a List: In-Store

Growing a List: In-Store

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 7, 2018

We\'re still focusing on the various touch points for growing your list. We continue looking at off-line options by discussing opportunities to grow your list in-store. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer, and our continued conversation on Growing Your List. And today, we\'re gonna talk about doing it in-store. I know email marketing is a digital space, and it all seems like it happens online, but physical locations for businesses is still a thing for now, even as the Toys \"R\" Us\'s of the world sadly disappear. We go to restaurants, we go to stores. It happens. You should be growing your list from your brick and mortar location. And why is that, Daniel? 00:51 Daniel Miller: Well, I think one of the first and most important reasons is repeat business. And I\'m gonna give you a great scenario right now. Here, there\'s oftentimes that we\'ll go out to lunch, and every time that we go out to lunch it feels like we\'re reinventing the wheel again. Everyone looks at each other, \"Where are we going?\" \"Oh, I don\'t know, let\'s go here. Let\'s try to find a new place.\" Having an email system set up that right around noon, an email goes out and tries to bring in customers with a free drink, a buy one get one, bring a friend, all those different creative ideas can really help your business grow. And I\'ll tell you this, I see a lot of restaurants and businesses that don\'t leverage this as much as they can. But really obtaining the email of your customer as they come in and try to get them to come back in works very, very well. 01:38 AS: Exactly, and Daniel brought up restaurants and our lunch or  deals every day. We have a perfect example that we\'re gonna close this talk with, so stay tuned for all of it. We\'ve got a real life applicable example to give you that worked on us and then we subscribed, so we\'ll get into that. And that\'s how a teaser works, ladies and gentlemen. The other reason why you should do it is sometimes there\'s gonna be people that come into the store that aren\'t gonna purchase that first time. But if you get them on that list, like Daniel said, you\'re gonna draw them in with those promo emails and turn those looky-loos into customers. So now we know why. Let\'s talk about how. And signage is really where it all starts, right? 02:17 DM: Exactly. And I\'m sure we\'ve all gone to purchase something at a store, whether it\'s a restaurant, it\'s a retail store, whatever that is. And you go in and at the cashier there is either like a phone number or a QR code or something that tells you sign up for emails. In some cases, it\'s just a fish bowl and you put in a business card for them to contact you. So there\'s a lot of different ways that you can try to generate and build your list, whatever is your preferred method. Here\'s some pro-tips to keep in mind. Pro-tip number one, if you decide to do it at the cash register, make sure that it\'s quick. You\'re building up a line, it\'s noon, people are there from work, they don\'t have two hours to sit down for lunch, they need to eat and get out. If your signage process is holding up that line and creating a line that\'s twice as long than it should be, that\'s gonna be a problem. That\'s gonna annoy people. 03:13 DM: If you\'re using QR codes and they\'re scanning, and the code doesn\'t link right or something like that, always make sure to test everything out first and make sure that it\'s efficient. So a recommendation, if you\'re doing something like a restaurant, I highly recommend maybe putting it out on tables, as your guests are eating at the tables, they will see that, they\'re enjoying the food. And again, it\'s all about flowing with the experience. Don\'t try to ask for the emails in weird situations, don\'t try to abrupt the flow of the experience is what I\'m trying to say. 03:45 AS: Yeah, or if you have sales people throughout the store who are helping you, they can even be walking around with tablets that have a quick sign-up form. And as you\'re talking and browsing through the store that you can sign up real quick and then get like, \"Hey we\'re giving you 10% off today if you sign up for our newsletter.\" 04:02 DM: Exactly. 04:02 AS: Any of those things that right there, you\'re gonna get those customers. And Daniel talked about all those good different ways to do it, whether it\'s with an SMS code, QR code, they go to URL to do it. 04:13 DM: Yeah, and then there\'s a... Something that\'s becoming more and more popular as Andy kind of referred to, at the moment of purchase when you use a credit card, they ask you, \"Do you want the printed receipt or email?\" And a lot of people are starting to choose email. And the cool thing about that is if you use your credit card, let\'s say with Square, and you type in your email once, that now saves to the Square database, and you no longer have to save your email again. It detects by with the credit card. So any time that you use that credit card at a later store, you\'re email is already in there, you can automatically subscribe to that store, making it easier for everybody. 04:49 AS: Yeah, and we mentioned a real-life example. And Daniel talked about putting something right there at the table. A week or two ago, Daniel and I decided to go to lunch at Chili\'s and they had those little electronic tablet type things, electronic kiosk almost, right there on the table at every table. You can order through it, you can pay through it. But the waiter came by and said, \"Hey if you sign up right now for our loyalty program, you can get free chips and salsa or soda right now.\" And so we\'re like, \"Okay.\" And two minutes later, we had free chips and salsa right there on our table for us to enjoy during lunch. And I\'ve been getting follow-up emails ever since. And they\'re sending me yummy food that makes me wanna go back. And Chili\'s isn\'t necessarily the place I always think of when I wanna go to lunch, but when they\'re sending me emails and doing good email marketing, I can probably bet that before too long Daniel and I will be back there for lunch. And that\'s why it\'s important to use your in-store locations to grow your list. 05:48 DM: And we get free chips and salsa every time now because you\'re part of their loyalty program. 05:52 AS: Wooh. You guys know I\'m all about that free food. Alright guys, that wraps up our conversation for Growing Your Store in Growing Your Store. Well, you\'ll grow your store too, if you\'re doing good email marketing. Growing Your List In Store. Catch us next time. Thanks guys.


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Growing a List: Phone

Growing a List: Phone

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 6, 2018

As we continue our conversation around growing a list, we take it offline for this episode and discuss using the phone to add subscribers. You\'ve already got potential subscribers on the phone, why not take a moment and ask them to join your list? 00:23 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re continuing our conversation on how to grow your list and today we\'re focusing on the phone. You may do phone customer support, maybe phone sales, but you\'re talking to people on the phone. Why not turn those people into email subscribers, right? 00:40 Daniel Miller: Exactly. And, you know, the phone is becoming, in a way, I don\'t wanna call it outdated, but it is a tool that less and less people like to use. Nobody wants to have to get on the phone and go through the automated system, and so forth. But at the end of the day, it is a great opportunity when somebody is on the phone with you to have that opportunity to ask for their email. The perfect scenario... Well, some of the perfect scenarios are if somebody... If you\'re having to follow up with somebody, specifically for a support call, just to ensure that the quality control has gone through, it\'s a perfect opportunity to ask for their email address to send them future updates in regards to product improvements and so forth. So any time that you\'re on a phone number if you\'re using a CRM, you should definitely have your customers\' profile open and ensure that all of your, I guess, needed fields are all filled out. So yeah, phone calls are the perfect chance to kind of fill in those gaps. 01:39 AS: I think that\'s a good point. You know, we use the dirty M word here, but Millennials don\'t necessarily like being on the phone and it\'s possible if they\'re calling you, it was the last resort. But you get the email there, and you can follow up there. You may be connecting with them in a way they\'re more comfortable and they\'re willing to continue that conversation. Like [01:56] ____ was saying, with quality control, how many times have you\'ve been on a support call only to get a follow-up email? \"How did we do? Give us feedback,\" or, \"Leave a review on our site,\" or, \"We wanna make sure the problem you called in for is solved, let us follow up with you and let you know that that ticket has been solved when it is.\" So that\'s a great opportunity. And like we\'re saying, it keeps them in touch. It may not be the only time you talk to them because you can follow up with additional emails, even if it\'s the monthly newsletter or if it\'s an automated journey that\'s aimed at turning them into a customer or a repeat customer, it\'s gonna keep in touch and make sure that you\'re always the first business they think of when they need your goods or services and they\'re there on the phone, right? 02:37 DM: Exactly, and the cool thing about having a phone communication as well, we\'ve been talking throughout the episodes so far, don\'t rely on one channel of communication, you need multiple ones. So if you have their email you may wanna try to obtain their phone number, not to bother them every other day, but guess what? If you notice that you sent out a few emails and they stop opening them, and then you start sending out more emails and they start bouncing it may trigger something in your CRM to automatically call that person and ensure that you still have the right email address. Stats have shown that people tend to change their emails around every two years. The reason being, most likely, it\'s because they changed jobs and so forth. So it\'s just common that people change their email and having another line of communication is an excellent way to follow up with them to ensure that you can still retain that contact and communication. 03:27 AS: Yeah, so hopefully we\'ve sold you on using your phone lines to grow your list. Let\'s talk a little bit about how to do that. And I know this is gonna sound amazing and totally ground-breaking, but just ask. 03:39 DM: Yeah. [laughter] 03:41 DM: It sounds ridiculous. Funny enough, there\'s actually a really good book by Ryan Levesque, Ask. And I never really understood what just asking meant until I read that book and he lays it out really, really well. There\'s really complicated concepts that we try to figure out, like, \"How do we identify core customers?\" Or, \"How do we identify what our customers really want?\" And really just asking is the secret there. On how to ask, as we\'ve been saying, the right opportunity, the right time and really following a conversation that flows is essential. If right in the middle of a support call with an angry customer, you ask for their email to follow up on new features and products, they\'re gonna tell you to go where the sun don\'t shine. [laughter] 04:21 DM: Beyond that, what you want to try to do is always make sure that it\'s a fluid and you\'re building a business relationship. So when you ask, make sure that it\'s in a timely manner that makes sense and in a conversation that makes sense as well. 04:33 AS: Yeah, it could always be one of those, \"Hey, before I let you go, do you mind if I ask if we get your email address so that we can follow up with you for review purposes, to check back in and make sure your problem was solved, or really just to stay in touch?\" Any of those ways, asking is gonna do it. There is this stat out there that I don\'t wanna erroneously say the number out, so look it up, but I think it was definitely in the vast majority of people will willingly subscribe just when you ask. So have that script or elevator pitch ready, if you need it, but just saying it right at the end of the conversation will work more times than not. 05:08 DM: Most definitely. And a pro tip, I believe, I can\'t remember what book I read this in, but follow the rules of the five yeses, especially on a phone. Ask certain questions that the other person on the line will immediately say yes to very easy questions like I don\'t know, let\'s say there was a support problem, it was fixed. \"Hey, was your problem fixed?\" \"Absolutely.\" \"Did we do it in a timely matter?\" \"Yes, you certainly did.\" \"Awesome, how is the support person?\" \"They were great.\" \"Oh, you know what... \" There, you\'re going through a line of success and you\'re building a relationship of yeses, once there, you can easily get to that final... And then you\'re like, \"Hey, to stay in contact, to keep you updated, and to make sure we don\'t have to be on the phone, do you mind if I just get your email and that way we can send you updates?\" That way, boom. You\'ve got now their email address. It was right in the conversation. And yeah, everyone\'s happy. 06:02 AS: Yeah, that wraps up or talk about growing your list with the phone. Catch us next time where we continue our conversation on growing your list. Thanks, everybody.


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