We Wrote a Book! Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer

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We Wrote a Book! Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer

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Drive Change: Social Justice is a Dish Best Served … Literally

Drive Change: Social Justice is a Dish Best Served … Literally

Beyond • July 12, 2016

It seems more important than ever to tell a story like that of Drive Change. A force for good in our society aimed at improving the lives of its employees, maintaining a conversation on social justice and serving delicious food. Drive Change brings its cause straight to the people taking it\'s food truck, Snowday, on the move with a message. We use our food truck as this living, breathing classroom but also as an advocacy tool. You see, the food truck employs formerly incarcerated young adults and gives them support, on the job training and assistance in achieving the future they desire. Did I mention the food is amazing? I don\'t have to because the awards are piling up ... as are the mentions in every \"Best of NY\" list on food trucks. Drive Change co-founder Roy Waterman and his team deserve all the accolades their food has received and more. In a world of hashtag activism, it seems as important as ever to give a platform to the individuals taking action to work for a better tomorrow. Key Takeaways: Support. Support. Support. Providing support to formerly incarcerated individuals is essential. Harnessing an untapped market in formerly incarcerated individuals and providing them with on the job training has helped them achieve the futures they desire. Turning a negative into a positive is an excellent way to engage an audience. Think outside the box to every possible customer touch point that could help deliver your message.


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What’s The Expected Open Rate For My Industry?

What’s The Expected Open Rate For My Industry?

Practical Marketer • July 11, 2016

An open rate depends on a variety of things when it comes to email marketing. Not everyone will open your email, so you shouldn’t expect a 100% open rate when you send out a campaign. It’s not impossible to get 100%, but you’ll need to be somewhat psychic. So what is the expected open rate of an email campaign? Some would be surprised to see that on average, across all industries, it’s 15% - 20%. Since that is across all industries, let’s break it down by a couple industries, measured during the course of one year as learned from Smart Insights: Automobile: 24.9% Computer Software: 22.1% Food Service: 22% Insurance: 29.7% School: 27.9% We can see that the average, when broken down into different industries, is improved. Don’t worry if you aren’t getting these numbers! There are certain tools and tips that you can put to use in order to increase your open rate ... even if it’s just a little bit. Segment your list. Creating a segmented, more targeted list will improve your opens rates. In retail, you may try to track what products your subscribers are interested in and promote similar products. List Hygiene. When people hear list hygiene they think, “Deleting contacts, NO!” However, deleting contacts that don’t read or open your email is beneficial when you really look at it. You reduce the total emails you send, saving you money. You’ll also reduce the greymail and possible abuse complaints, increasing your deliverability. Preview Text. This is an advanced tool for some which allows users to control what subscribers see before even opening the email, enticing users to open the email beyond the subject line. Remember not to lie or be deceptive about that either.


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How to keep my branding consistent in my email marketing?

How to keep my branding consistent in my email marketing?

Practical Marketer • July 8, 2016

How to keep your branding consistent in your email marketing is a matter of simply being consistent in everything that you do across all customer touchpoints for marketing and all other aspects of your business. Is that it? Problem solved, next question? Yes and no. There are three key aspects that you can focus on in order to execute consistently on your branding. Deliver On Your Promise This means first and foremost staying true to the mission statement of your company in each and every thing that you do. That’s how a customer is treated when they walk in the door of your brick-and-mortar location and it’s what you communicate to them with your email marketing … and many things in between. Delivering on your promise also applies to what you told subscribers to expect when they opted-in to receiving email communications from you. This includes the frequency with which you send your email campaigns and the content they asked to receive. Design The next aspect of being consistent with your branding is design. The user experience should remain the same whether it is in your email campaigns, website, social media posts, in your brick-and-mortar location and everywhere else a customer can interact with your business. In email marketing, this includes the color schemes of your email templates and even consistency with the colors of your buttons to match the ones on your website and landing pages. It can also include building a navigation at the top of your emails so that your template experience is similar to what customers view on your website. Even for special events such as holidays, there should still be consistent aspects of your brand that carry through, so that a subscriber will never doubt from who they are receiving an email campaign. Voice No, the latest email marketing feature isn’t celebrity voices reading your email campaigns (even though some may argue it should be … me included). This is how you’re communicating your message, who is delivering it and more. Voice means the personality that you infuse into your email campaigns. Some businesses are funny, some are informative. Regardless of what it is, it needs to be consistent … and authentically you. Who it is that is delivering your messages should also be the same as often as possible. This starts in the From Name subscribers will see in your inbox and ends in the email signature when applicable. Whether it says your business’ name or something such as Andy from Benchmark, your subscribers should know from who to expect your email communications.


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How Can I Avoid Harming My Brand With My Email Marketing?

How Can I Avoid Harming My Brand With My Email Marketing?

Practical Marketer • July 5, 2016

To avoid harming your brand, you need to avoid consistently sending unwanted emails. Not just once or twice, but consistently sending time after time will be the factor in harming your brand. It’s like a bully at school knocking your books down every time an email is sent. A little extreme, but you get the picture. What you should avoid doing, before you harm your brand: Using A Public Domain Irregular Sending Sending Grey Mail Using A Public Domain Using a public domain such as Gmail, Yahoo, or AOL can harm your brand when sending emails. The reason being is that anybody can sign up for these services and create an email. That doesn’t make your brand any different than the 6 billion individuals in the world. What makes you different? Having a private domain for your email address will not only improve your branding, but also your deliverability. Irregular Sending Sending irregularly is a problem as well. It’s hard to determine when to send a campaign to your subscribers. Should it be daily? Weekly? Monthly? Quarterly? Yearly? The answer is any of the above! Pay attention to your reports to know the frequency with which your subscribers want you to send. You can also employ different strategies for a daily email campaign and then a monthly email campaign as well. This could be a type of segment! The point is to make sure you have enough content and enough time to stay on a regular schedule. If a person is expecting an email from you subscription at 1pm every week, keep that schedule! You’ll lose interest and subscribers if your schedule bounces around everywhere during the year. Grey Mail Grey Mail is a term not widely known or used in email marketing. Grey Mail is the email that subscribers receive, but do not open. They don’t open the email often because the subscriber knows what the email is about. It could be a transactional email, notification email or even a promotional email that they don’t care to open. It’s not a usually bad thing to send to these contacts, but nowadays there is so much Grey Mail that it’s starting to look like spam from the 90s and early millennium. What should you do with Grey Mail? It’s the same question as, “what can I do to improve my deliverability?” The answer is keeping up with your list hygiene. Cleaning your list of bounces and unopens regularly can improve your deliverability, brand and ultimately your ROI. Cleaning your list doesn’t mean deleting your contacts or subscribers, but maybe setting them aside for a different strategy. Allow them a chance to unsubscribe. You don’t want to be emailing anyone that doesn’t want it! That will only hurt your brand.


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HBO Sits Atop the Iron Throne with its Game Of Thrones Audience Retention Emails

Beyond • July 1, 2016

If you’re anything like me, you’re very much looking forward to the three-day holiday weekend. However, if you’re really like me you’re slightly dreading the prospect of a Sunday night without Game of Thrones … and at least a year’s wait until the new season airs. Summertime is already a slow time for TV. What am I going to watch?! Am I going to have to talk to my friends and family? And what are we even going to talk about if not for a new episode of Thrones? Well, thankfully for me, HBO’s email marketing team apparently owns some real estate in my brain. Knowing some of their viewers may be sharing many of the same thoughts, the email marketing team at HBO fired off a pair of emails as a sort of Doomsday survival kit … if your personal end of days is not being able to watch new episodes of Game of Thrones for a while (don’t judge me). There are a couple of lessons to be learned from this duo of email campaigns courtesy of HBO Now. The first lesson is timing. The initial thought may be to send these emails Sunday night, shortly after the season finale aired. However, HBO understands the current climate. In the DVR culture of today, everyone isn’t watching episodes as soon as they air (no matter how silly I think it would be to wait to watch that show). Plus, it gives the audience a few days to really start missing Game of Thrones as they realize there isn’t another incredible episode on the way. The second goal of these emails is customer retention. For those of us feeling the loss of Game of Thrones in our lives, HBO announced some of its new offerings to fill the void. Between the two emails, I learned about a new mini-series called The Night Of that seemed like it may hit me in my crime drama sweet spot and I got excited all over again about Vice Principals, the latter of which I’ve already laughed at the trailer for numerous times. Also, in case their Game of Thrones audience wasn’t already watching other series the network offers such as Ballers, they made sure I knew I had a chance to catch up before the new season airs next month. They also reminded me of other series like Silicon Valley and even an older offering in Deadwood, for which I may just be due a rewatch binge. Why is this important? According to HubSpot, email marketing was credited as the most effective digital marketing channel for customer retention in the United States in 2014. Think about these emails from HBO as you’re sitting around with your marketing team pondering ways to build your brand and increase customer loyalty. Remember this lesson on timing and striking when the iron is hot (a phrase which has possibly never been more aptly used than in reference to Game of Thrones). Plus, by understanding the headspace of their audience, HBO capitalized on an opportunity to remind its audience of its other programming options. Not only can that serve to grow the audience for other shows, but it is a chance to delight viewers suffering from post-Games of Thrones grief. How are you using email marketing to boost customer retention? Share your ideas with us in the comments below!


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Get Inspired: A Super-Hot Summer Email Campaign Design

Get Inspired: A Super-Hot Summer Email Campaign Design

Beyond • June 29, 2016

In the last several posts (on how to use summer to reinvent email campaigns and about how to keep email campaigns focused during the summer), we talked at length about kicking up the creative factor of your summer email campaigns, but some of you might be wondering how to do that exactly. If you’re scratching your head when it comes to creating cool email marketing content, then sit down, grab a lemonade and let me guide you through some killer examples. Of course, everyone knows summer is all about the beach, the sun, BBQs, etc. What you don’t want to do is be boring and stick with those cliché images. Take this example of a summer email campaign designed to promote a vacation package. It’s uninspiring, especially when compared to what UGG produced (below). The popular shoe company took their product, got inspired by summer destinations and put their product in play in a stunning summer email campaign set in Greece. The visuals are stunning, thematic and balanced with complimentary colors and three big bold images with clear, crisp text. Your eye isn’t having to hunt for the text like it had to with the first example. UGG, known for their winter footwear of slouchy furry boots, took a dramatic new direction and promoted sandals and a higher end vacation destination. You can be sure that their campaign goal here was to reach a more elevated audience. In other words, UGGs are classy, but still relaxed. What that first hum-drum and relatively uninteresting travel campaign did get right was the mobile-friendly feature. Invoking images of travel is always a good idea. I love what Icon did with their Parisian hot-air balloon email campaign: Each of the pictures in the four quadrants is too similar. The eye sort of glazes over the campaign. It’s a great concept, and is very fairytale like if your audience favors that tone, but there should have been fewer patterns and more pop of colors in at least two of the boxes. Running on the idea of summer BBQs, you can be inspired by summer food favorites to promote your own summer sale. One shop in the UK does it brilliantly by using chunky watermelon cubes to spell out “SALE.” Seeing some visually stunning examples of awesome summer email campaigns always helps get your own creative juices flowing. If you’re still in brainstorm mode, then check out what your industry thought leaders have been doing and see if you can pull inspiration from there. The goal isn’t to copy what someone else is doing or to even have that same campaign focus. The goal is to invest 10 minutes in learning about to what else your consumers are exposed. If you’re anything like me, you can be driven to analysis paralysis with too much data – or you can get lost in a rabbit hole of visuals. So keep it Lean and stay focused. Create quick brainstorms, a Venn diagram, or family tree inspired outline of what your key messaging goals are, what the industry conversation is and where you see the gap. Have a structured and focused messaging funnel will help streamline the process. After all, you should be inspired by design – not consumed by it. The same goes for your audience. Great design should inspire your audience and support the message or product. It should take over or dominate your messaging.


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1,810 Seconds with 2-Second Lean’s Paul Akers

1,810 Seconds with 2-Second Lean’s Paul Akers

Beyond • June 28, 2016

Paul Akers had to go to Japan to become fully immersed in Lean culture. Thanks to him, all of us need not leave our desks. To say we were excited to speak to Paul Akers and hear his story is an understatement. His Lean Journey is one of positivity and joy, albeit not with a few bumps along the road. You really have no clue what lean is until you really start to understand, because it was 1,000x more powerful than I was practicing it. We talked to him about his own company, FastCap, and how they have benefited from implementing Lean. Despite speaking, consulting, authoring books and so much more, we managed to ask Paul one question he said he\'s never been asked before. Plus, we got the scoop on Paul\'s yet-to-be-announced fourth book. This is a must listen for any entrepreneur looking to maximize efficiency and eliminate waste (which should be all of us). Listen and enjoy! Key takeaways: Lean is really about tapping into the true potential of a human being Invest in habitual learning, by meeting for at least 5 minutes every day Build a culture that is comfortable in giving praise to others Teach people to see waste and do something to eliminate it


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How to Use the Start of Summer to Reinvent Your Email Campaigns

How to Use the Start of Summer to Reinvent Your Email Campaigns

Beyond • June 23, 2016

If you’ve been on social media, you’ll see that graduations and vacations are the key celebration points this month right. It’s summer and it’s officially time to check out for the next three months. At least, that’s the attitude your customers have. You and I, however, are still in the in the belly of the ship, rowing away to the beat of the marketing drum. Summer gives us a chance to escape as well – at least from the marketing monotony we’ve endured the last few months. Summer is the perfect playground to experiment with new ideas. To generate some new ideas, have a pow-wow session or use some of the more left wing ideas that your team came up with in the past which might have been too alternative. What’s something really fund and different? Are there any other mediums you can use? How about a video campaign or an editorial spread that’s filled with images and inspiration? Whatever you decide, don’t let it be an infographic. Infographics take a lot of time to plan out and design. Further, no one is interested in data during the summer. If it absolutely has to be an infographic, then keep it visual heavy and content light. Keep it simple and easy to digest in 30 seconds. If you’re trying out a new email campaign strategy, keep in mind that your click, open and conversion rates won’t be quite as high as expected. After all, we agreed that most people have already checked out. So don’t be discouraged by poor returns because the first month or two back from the holidays will give you a better sense of how people feel about the campaign strategy shift. If the marketing overlords are demanding more immediate answers to keep in mind with their yearly goals, remind them that email marketing is a long game. You’ll factor in results with the overall yearly achievement toward the end of the year, but you can’t properly plan for next year unless you have a good data sample from the time and energy you invested into a new campaign. Your summer campaign shift is more than just about data. It’s also about your ability to plan and execute a new strategy. You’ll have a phase for developing a new idea or two and then you’re sort of reinventing the wheel (or at least modifying your processes) to carry out the idea. This serves as an important learning curve. As your try out new campaign strategies, you’ll be seeing if something took more time than usual or factored in a higher cost. Were there unforeseen glitches and how likely is that to impact the overall process? Even once you’ve sorted all that out, you need another campaign cycle to try again now that things are smoothed out. So you see, this is most certainly a process. Email campaigns are finely crafted machines – and not lumps of rock that you catapult out to your audience in hope that it hits something. There’s a design, an engineering and a delivery that need to be taking into consideration.


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New Partnership: LiveIntent & Benchmark Email

New Partnership: LiveIntent & Benchmark Email

Beyond • June 21, 2016

Email Marketing creates value for your business and your customers. You provide the value for your subscribers by offering them sales and promotions, as well as helpful information and in some cases entertainment. The value for your business comes from the high ROI that email marketing offers both in creating sales and branding opportunities. However, if you’re efficient enough at your email marketing and have great list growth practices with minimal churn, there’s additional revenue that you can be generating … while also offering value to other businesses as well. Enter the Benchmark Email Partnership with LiveIntent. Generate new revenue with the emails you are already sending You can generate advertising revenue by allowing LiveIntent’s platform to serve an ad into the emails you’re already deploying. You have full control over your email experience and can decide where the ad will be placed, as well as category blocking capabilities. Once you receive your set of HTML LiveTags from LiveIntent, you will implement it into your template design, perform a quick test to ensure they are working properly and you’ll be ready to start generating advertising revenue every time you deploy a campaign. Requirements: Benchmark Email Account LiveIntent Account How to integrate: Contact Benchmark Email and we will help you set up your LiveIntent account Receive your unique set of HTML LiveTags from LiveIntent Implement the tags into your campaigns Test and Deploy!


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Infographic: Data About Dudes

Infographic: Data About Dudes

Beyond • June 17, 2016

Targeted, relevant content is key for any marketing channel and email especially makes that simple. Properly segmenting your lists and understanding who are the individuals that make up your key demographics go a long way to making your subscribers feel as if each specific email campaign is meant just for them. I\'m sure most of you have sent, or at least scheduled, your Father\'s Day email marketing campaigns to send. However, did you create those campaigns with a researched understanding of what men are looking for as gifts? It\'s not too late to make a few tweaks, or at the very least learn a few lessons for next year (and for any male-centric marketing campaign all year). That\'s why we put together this infographic that is full of Data About Dudes (D.A.D.). Check it out:


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Insider Tips Webinar: Improve & Understand Your Email Deliverability

Beyond • June 17, 2016

This is a very exciting announcement! Not only are we going to be holding a new deliverability webinar on June 23rd at 12:30pm (BST), but it will also be held in conjunction with the Oxford College of Marketing as part of their Marketing in Practice webinar series. This deliverability webinar is free of charge and open to everyone. Just click on the link to sign up. What you will learn Often our thoughts and efforts are consumed by the idea of creating amazing email content which is great and necessary, but your email content is actually only one part of email marketing. Neglecting your deliverability may mean that your incredible content never reaches your subscribers. Having your campaign avoid the spam filter is not about luck and although deliverability is quite a complex topic, this webinar will offer you plenty of helpful tips on improving and controlling yours. In this webinar, Sally Beers, our expert from the UK, will guide you through the following points: What is deliverability? The life of an email: from email creation to the inbox Measuring deliverability Common problems The future of deliverability Questions As with all our webinars, questions are more than welcome. If you can’t wait, use the #BenchmarkWebinar hashtag on Twitter for all your comments and suggestions, before, during and after the webinar. See you there!


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3 Core Truths About Millennial Dads

3 Core Truths About Millennial Dads

Beyond • June 16, 2016

The modern man has a blurred identity. There was a Coke commercial which played this out perfectly, showing a couple going through raising a child in the first year of his life before finding out they will be parents again. That first year shows life for the modern dad. [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRqUTA6AegA[/embed] Life is a hot mess. Parenting duties are shared. There is very little control. There’s authenticity and vulnerability, which are highly valued qualities for millennial dads. Millennial dads break the mold when it comes to gender stereotypes for men. They defy the most common myth for men these days. In the last post, we already destroyed the idea that men belong to patriarchy. What other truths do we need to understand men? First Truth: Men are Emotional The first truth is that, contrary to myth, men aren’t emotionally absent. Myth of emotionally unavailability stems from the idea that men don’t have feelings; it stems from patriarchy. But there’s a difference between having feelings and showing feelings. Older generations are taught not to show any. This doesn’t mean they don’t have them. In fact, it can be argued that a man’s emotional landscape is likely more fragile than a woman’s because it is rarely exposed for challenged. There’s something to be said about men and their emotions. It can also be argued that because they’re less explored, men are also less conflicted when it comes to dealing with problems since they’re able to separate the emotion from facts at hand. This is often why people believe that men are solution oriented while women are discussion oriented. Of course, these aren’t strict gender divisions. Some men fall into narratives more while other women are more solution oriented, having learnt to compartmentalize a flood of emotions. So when it comes to your marketing, remember that men are still focused creatures who are heavily drawn to visuals. They’ll be more affected with targeted visuals and even videos. Lead with this. Let copy follow and keep it short and concise so that your call to action buttons or text stand out even more. Second Truth: Men Are Just as Important as Women When it Comes to Being a Parent Men actually play a double role when parenthood is imminent. They’re faced with thoughts on how to be more secure, and how to be able to provide for their new family, and be as source of unwavering support for new moms. There’s more. LiveScience shows that the “male brain becomes especially primed for cooperation in the months before becoming a father. Fathers-to-be go through hormone changes…which likely encourage paternal behavior.” Beyond that, fathers question their significance as parents. Many don’t know that the type of paternal play fathers engage in (spontaneous interaction and rough housing) is important for building confidence in a child’s early development. In the Coke ad, it’s about keeping the baby alive. Quite literally that’s priority number one for dad. But dads are about more than that. Dads don’t realized that their role as father is critical for a child’s development and how that works out. It’s going to be the job of your marketing department to show two prong value: value of a father to a mate and value of a father to the child. Third Truth: No Man is – or wants to be – an Island The interesting little tidbit about men is that they aren’t as competitive with each other as women tend to be, especially as they get older. In that sense, men are more inclined toward bonding and cooperation, but also struggle to always initiate this. And when it comes to your marketing, your goal will be to imitate bonding. Next week, I’ll show you how your marketing team can do this.


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The Best Way to Market to Men is to Tap into a “Wolf Pack” Mentality

The Best Way to Market to Men is to Tap into a “Wolf Pack” Mentality

Beyond • June 16, 2016

Last week we talked about three core truths to Millennial dads, that included lesser known truths about men. First, men are emotional. They experience or express emotions differently, but they’re nonetheless ripe with them. Second, men want to feel equally valued with their partners when it comes to being a parent – so if your business is family related services or products, it would be a mistake to assume women are the decision makers. Women might very well be decision makers, but men like to feel they have a role to play as well that’s of value to the family. Finally, no man is or wants to be an island. As we’d said last week, “The interesting little tidbit about men is that they aren’t as competitive with each other as women tend to be, especially as they get older. In that sense, men are more inclined toward bonding and cooperation, but also struggle to always initiate this. When it comes to your marketing, your goal will be to imitate bonding.” Pack mentality is a powerful draw for men. Look at all the “bro” films that are getting pushed out and that are highly successful. There’s something intimate about a pack mentality, a return to a ‘normalcy’ before women came into the picture. So the question is where does pack mentality come from and what does it mean for your marketing? Robert Evans Wilson Jr. wrote a great article for Psychology Today titled “Pack Mentality: Humans are motivated by status as animals,” which lays out some excellent points. Evans writes, “human beings are just as motivated by it as a pack animal. When Abraham Maslow created his Theory of Human Motivation in 1943, he identified five levels of motivation or five needs that humans strive to satisfy. Those needs are, in order: Survival, Safety, Social, Esteem, and Fulfillment.” He goes into what each means, but for our purposes here we’re looking at social. This isn’t the first you’ve heard of it. The need for social behavior is why football nights and poker nights are a thing. It’s why tailgate parties and fishing trips are a thing. I mean, just look at how popular The Hangover movie series was and you’ve got yourself a pretty good idea of what it means to be part of a pack and why it’s such a powerful appeal. This pack mentality is really different from another theory known as herd behavior. Herd behavior is the idea that individuals in a group can act collectively without centralized direction. What makes it important to bring up the theory of herd behavior is that most marketing that’s aimed at creating a pack mentality actually just relies on herd behavior. There’s a difference between a collective group of people and a tribe. There’s a difference between a tribe and a pack. Each one from herd to tribe to pack grows more niche, more intimate and more exclusive. As you plan your marketing, depending on what your offering, you’ll need to funnel your message and your brand experience down to an experience that’s equally as niche and exclusive as a pack.


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How to Market to Older Men

How to Market to Older Men

Beyond • June 15, 2016

Let\'s focus on one type of men that if we often see in the landscape of advertising campaigns. The confident man who sets himself apart. He has control of his life and stands on his own as a one-manned island. Maybe he has a significant other, but she’s more of an accessory in his life than a partner. This man is poised as being in the prime of his life, salt and pepper hair, financially secure, and with a future where he’s in command. Retirement commercials are brimming with this version of manhood. This is the man typical of older generations, the strong stoic type and he’s sets a vivid contrast against the modern man, the millennial dad that we discussed last week. These are men in the twilight of the Baby Boomer generation all the way to seniors. They’re people with traditional values, but they’re also not traditionally the “retired” generation of their forefathers who spent their days not doing a whole lot. This group wants to be active. They want options. When marketing to them, that’s what you have to get across first and foremost. Keynote speaker and trends observer Patrick Dixon understands this market well and has the following key principles to take away when considering how to craft your message to gear marketing towards an older demographic. Tip #1: Don’t Think in Terms of Age. Think in Terms of Options “Whole generations of people of retirement age enjoying all kinds of adventurous activities that would have seemed very strange in the past. Older people are often very active, want to explore, learn new things, start new businesses, support new organizations. And even though they may not actually do all the things they think about doing, they want to know the possibility is there – maybe that there is a gym and a sauna at the hotel, that the resort has a couple of lively places which are open late at night and so on.” – Patrick Dixon Tip #2: Understand Their Limitations Patrick makes an excellent point about physical needs of this group, including poor eyesight. He points out something so simple as restaurant menus or logos on items being something that’s not easily accessible to mature men. “Let me give you an example: in many European cities one of the main groups eating in restaurants are those over 50, yet very few 50 year olds are able to read a menu by candlelight without their reading glasses. That is because the menus are usually designed by young people in print shops not for senior citizens. What a crazy situation: the people who the restaurants want to market to cannot read any of their sales literature.” – Patrick Dixon Tip #3: Know That Your Market Has a Higher Disposable Income This demographic is settled in life. By now, houses and cars are usually paid off and educating children is also out of the way. They’re looking for what’s next and since they’re planners, they have a higher level of financial security than younger men looking to invest in the same markets. Yet, as shown in the opening advertisement example here, Patrick adds that older men want to feel “cool.” They don’t want to be pictured as geriatric and they certainly will not invest in products, or experiences that they don’t identify with. An example Patrick gives is of a cruise ship marketing to older men. Typically, these businesses have photos of families and mothers, but this no older man would feel at home there. Go for glamour instead. My tip, channel old Hollywood and ask yourself what would Steve McQueen be into right now? What would appeal to him? That right there is your target market and the spirit of your audience.


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