Tags: blog

The Best Blog Posts on Email Marketing

Beyond • November 23, 2015

Over time, we’ve developed a digital library of the best email marketing articles on the web. This can be a lot for anyone to sift through, so we’re doing to sifting for you. Whether you’re new to Benchmark or are looking for refresher course on what matters to most, here’s your focused summary of the best email marketing blog posts. How to get Gifs and Memes in Email Campaigns This post is all about gifs and memes, which are particularly important if you’re going to be catering to a millennial audience. The best takeaway from the post is, “If you’re using gifs, you want to make sure you’re using it to further your email campaign rather than distract from it. For example, it’s a great way to showcase your product or initiate how a client can engage with your brand.” (Continue Reading) Millennials Haven’t Ditched Email for Social Media If you think that email marketing is outdated and that all Millennials have ditched it for social media, think again. The best takeaway from the post is, “You also want their attention in a one-on-one capacity, and you’re going to secure that through visually driven email marketing campaigns. There’s another strain of thought along this these lines and that’s that Millennials only use email for business – even the influential savvy type with money to invest. On that theory, here are 2 facts: (1) Millennials tend to keep email for business, but they’re still interested in inviting businesses into their inboxes to take advantage of promotion; (2) Email is for serious business, while social media is still for socializing. On that note, Millennials aren’t moving away from email so much as they’re utilizing more channels to communicate.” (Continue Reading) The Essence of Email Marketing It can be overwhelming to grasp all the different aspects of email marketing, which is why a blog post on quotes is a helpful and light-hearted way to underscore why we do it and why it matters. The best takeaway is, “Bait without a hook is just food.\" – John Hayes on email CTAs…Think about which of these quotes made you stop and think for a bit. If you had to stop and think about it, chances are it’s a gap in your current email marketing campaign. The next step is to chart out where you are now and where you want to go. What action do you want your audience to follow through on when they get your email marketing campaign. Are you looking for a sale, a social share, a conversation or some other type of action? Once you can identify that, you can pair the gaps you discovered here and start creating a strategy.” (Continue Reading) Rescuing Your Email Campaigns From the \"Junk\" Folder It doesn’t matter how hard you work on your email marketing campaigns … if no one is seeing them. On that note, the most important takeaway is, “Certain email servers have more sensitive spam triggers than others, which means that they’re more inclined to toss your campaign into a slush pile. How an email server treats email content will depend on the server. There’s another more challenging face to this problem: you ultimately have zero control of other people’s email servers.” (Continue Reading)


Read More

The Best Blog Posts on Email Marketing

Beyond • October 11, 2015

Over time, we’ve developed a digital library of the best email marketing articles on the web. This can be a lot for anyone to sift through, so we’re doing to sifting for you. Whether you’re new to Benchmark or are looking for refresher course on what matters to most, here’s your focused summary of the best email marketing blog posts. How to get Gifs and Memes in Email Campaigns This post is all about gifs and memes, which are particularly important if you’re going to be catering to a millennial audience. The best takeaway from the post is, “If you’re using gifs, you want to make sure you’re using it to further your email campaign rather than distract from it. For example, it’s a great way to showcase your product or initiate how a client can engage with your brand.” (Continue Reading) Millennials Haven’t Ditched Email for Social Media If you think that email marketing is outdated and that all Millennials have ditched it for social media, think again. The best takeaway from the post is, “You also want their attention in a one-on-one capacity, and you’re going to secure that through visually driven email marketing campaigns. There’s another strain of thought along this these lines and that’s that Millennials only use email for business – even the influential savvy type with money to invest. On that theory, here are 2 facts: (1) Millennials tend to keep email for business, but they’re still interested in inviting businesses into their inboxes to take advantage of promotion; (2) Email is for serious business, while social media is still for socializing. On that note, Millennials aren’t moving away from email so much as they’re utilizing more channels to communicate.” (Continue Reading) The Essence of Email Marketing It can be overwhelming to grasp all the different aspects of email marketing, which is why a blog post on quotes is a helpful and light-hearted way to underscore why we do it and why it matters. The best takeaway is, “Bait without a hook is just food.\" – John Hayes on email CTAs…Think about which of these quotes made you stop and think for a bit. If you had to stop and think about it, chances are it’s a gap in your current email marketing campaign. The next step is to chart out where you are now and where you want to go. What action do you want your audience to follow through on when they get your email marketing campaign. Are you looking for a sale, a social share, a conversation or some other type of action? Once you can identify that, you can pair the gaps you discovered here and start creating a strategy.” (Continue Reading) Rescuing Your Email Campaigns From the \"Junk\" Folder It doesn’t matter how hard you work on your email marketing campaigns … if no one is seeing them. On that note, the most important takeaway is, “Certain email servers have more sensitive spam triggers than others, which means that they’re more inclined to toss your campaign into a slush pile. How an email server treats email content will depend on the server. There’s another more challenging face to this problem: you ultimately have zero control of other people’s email servers.” (Continue Reading)


Read More
How to Self-Edit Your Blog Posts Like a Pro

How to Self-Edit Your Blog Posts Like a Pro

Beyond • March 4, 2015

Whether you are a seasoned writer or a small business owner blogging for the first time, writing is the easy part. It’s the spelling, grammar, and editing that gives people fits. If you have the first draft of your blog post done, good news: the hard part is over. Once your ideas are on paper (or on screen), it’s a lot easier to refine or rewrite them. We’ve put together a few editing tips that will take your rough drafts from paltry to publishable. Take a Break Don’t go straight from writing your post to editing it. Take a walk, run an errand, hit the gym – just get away from your post. I like to return to my rough drafts a full day later. Looking at your writing with fresh eyes will help you see the flaws in your logic, delete what is unnecessary, or determine what needs to be expanded. Remember Your Readers When you edit, always ask “how does this help my reader?” You’re writing the post because it has value for your audience, so make sure that value is clear to you and to them. Active vs. Passive Voice Passive voice is when something happens to someone; active voice is when someone does something. Here are some examples – which sentence sounds better? Jim was running to the bus. Jim ran to the bus. Probably the second one, right? That’s because the second one is in active voice, not passive. Active voice indicates confidence in your argument, makes your writing punchier, and clarifies your point. Confusing active and passive voice is common blogging blunder, along with these 10 common grammar errors. Short Sentences Longer sentences are harder to understand, so keep your sentences short and to the point. Don’t be afraid of sentence fragments. Seriously. They help break up your content, and they’re a great way to express your personality and keep your tone light-hearted and enjoyable. Don’t Use Jargon Unless you’re writing for a very specific audience, use plain English words that anyone can understand. Jargon can alienate your audience and make your argument unclear. Verbs and Adverbs Use exciting verbs. Instead of “walked,” try “sauntered.” Or instead of “ate,” try “devoured.” Boring verbs are, well, boring. Using animated verbs eliminates the need for adverbs. For example, instead of staying “Jim ran quickly to the bus”, try “Jim sprinted to the bus.” Only use an adverb if it changes or affects the ultimate meaning of your sentence – if you’re using an adverb to intensify an action, pick a punchier verb. Read Out Loud I always read my blog posts out loud because it helps me find sentences that don’t flow properly. Blog posts should be conversational, and reading your writing out loud helps you find where your post reads a bit too formal or informal. It also helps me locate any wayward typos or grammar errors, even ones that I missed on my first four or five rounds of editing. The editing phase is when you take your blog posts from average to extraordinary. Don’t be afraid to completely rip apart your first draft! That’s what first drafts are for. If you still think your posts need improvement, have a writing buddy edit them. A fresh pair of eyes is always a good idea!


Read More
Why Your Website Needs A Blog

Why Your Website Needs A Blog

Beyond • July 15, 2013

Having a blog on your website is now an essential component of your online marketing strategy. With the changes that Google has made in recent months with the Panda and Penguin updates, having a solid content strategy is more important than ever before and your blog is the central hub for your websites content development. Regularly updating and adding posts to your blog is the catalyst for many of your marketing strategies. This is the prime reason why you need to have a blog. Here are some other important reasons why a blog is a must: It provides SEO benefits. Content is still king and your blog is one of the most effective ways to continuously add fresh content to your website, which will help you maintain your search ranking.   It’s an easy way to add content. Blogs make it easy to add content. Rather than having to create new pages on your website, all you have to do is log in and add the content. With the simplicity of blog platforms today, if you know your way around Microsoft Word you can easily add content to a blog.   Establish yourself as a thought leader and expert. The more you blog and the more you write about topics within your industry, the better chance that you have of being an expert in your industry.   It will increase website traffic. Having a blog gives people a reason to come back to your website on a regular basis, thus helping to increase new and repeat traffic.   It is great sharable social media content. Ever struggle about what to post on Facebook or Twitter? A blog can easily fix this problem. Once you add a blog post to your website, your next step should be to share it on your social media profiles.   It helps with user engagement. Blogging not only helps to increase traffic to your website, it also gives users another way to engage with your company. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and encourage users to comment on your posts. This will create discussions and get people more involved with your brand. These are only a few of the dozens of ways that a blog will benefit your website and your brand as a whole. If you don’t already have a blog on your website, you need to seriously consider adding one. Remember, having a blog is only the beginning. Once you add it to your website, you need to create content and post regularly to maximize its effectiveness. Happy blogging!


Read More
Apps that Optimize Your Time: IBlueSky, Daily Tracker & More

Apps that Optimize Your Time: IBlueSky, Daily Tracker & More

Beyond • December 15, 2011

On average, people spend about 45 minutes to a full hour a day waiting. You’re waiting for your employees to round up for a meeting. You’re waiting for your boss to make his rounds. You’re waiting for the delivery guy, in line for lunch and the list goes on and on. Just think back to today and how many times you had to wait for something, even if just for a few minutes. Those minutes rack up into months, sometimes years. Add to that estimate that you spend a good third of your life at work. However, business owners know that there is no scrimmage line between life work and play when you’re running your own business. For this type of person, the busy business owner, it becomes imperative to squeeze the juice out of every available minute of free time – and these apps will help you do just that. On an additional plus side, they’re such creative apps that they will surely inspire you to think outside the box…which is another must-have trait for any successful business owner. Mind Mapping with IBlueSky IBlueSky – You probably haven’t heard of “mind mapping.” It’s what you do when you’re creative and connecting thoughts: A subject comes to mind and a sub-point follows it. Nanoseconds thereafter, you’ve thought of a tangent point. This is mind mapping and it’s done by just about everyone. IBlueSky (which goes for just under $10) helps people do this better and track their thoughts without having to rely on memory and a breadcrumb trail of sticky notes. Plan Your Day with Daily Tracker Going beyond just keeping track and making the most of your time, the Daily Tracker app helps you get a grip on your habits. This is pretty much a must-do for everyone, especially with New Year’s around the corner – but if you’re a small business owner you know that time and money are your most valuable resources. With Daily Tracker you can instantly keep tabs on yourself rather than having to jot it down later (if you even remember). Daily Tracker has a planner, a to-do list, notes, an expense list that’s accompanied by a sum alongside the header, keeping you updated on your current tab. You can even use it to keep track of how much you’ve slept – which may sound odd but if you’ve just ditched your day job for your own dream, then the freedom to sleep in is your number one enemy and time-waster. Daily Tracker also runs at just under $10. Jot It Down with Napkin Genius They say the best ideas are often presented on napkins. I’d say this is pretty much true and goes back to my point that innovators are constantly thinking. When your next idea pops to mind, you can take advantage of Napkin Genius to jot it down. This app is best for visually oriented people, like graphic designers, interior designers, etc. It’s also really handy to use as a quick tool to communicate an idea to a colleague or client…and at $1.99 it’s completely affordable. Evernote, SOHO & Diacarta In addition to these note taking and annotating applications, there are Evernote and SOHO, which I discussed in a much earlier blog. Regardless of what specific app you currently use, any successful entrepreneur has a personal calendar/planner system in place - and Diacarta is a pretty popular one among the app community.


Read More
Book Review: Small Business, Big Vision by Adam & Matthew Toren

Book Review: Small Business, Big Vision by Adam & Matthew Toren

Beyond • December 15, 2011

Let’s face it - you can’t throw a rock without hitting a book on how to start (and run) a small business. Unfortunately, like Roseanne Barr’s declaration that women are all married to the same man, there’s so much overlap in business advice today that it probably feels like we’re all reading the same, boring tome, over and over and over. When entrepreneur brothers Adam and Matthew Toren set out to write their book, Small Business, Big Vision: Lessons on How to Dominate Your Market from Self-Made Entrepreneurs Who Did It Right, they could have easily stayed in the comfortable business advice echo chamber we’re all familiar with. Instead they made a run for it, and their book of fresh-yet-practical advice on building a business proves that their risk is our gain. Creating a vision for your business is the name of the game here, but that’s just the starting point. Using real stories from successful entrepreneurs to back up their advice, along with conversational, straightforward writing, the Torens cover lots of ground, and here are some of the topics you’ll see in their book: Investors: Early on or Down the Line? Most aspiring entrepreneurs aim for investment cash to fund an office, hire employees and buy equipment. It makes sense: who wants to spend their own nest egg to get things rolling? But what if you could survive without these things, even in the very beginning? According to the Torens, succeeding often means waving off the old rule that getting investors early on is a no-brainer. The Torens deliver a robust breakdown that explains why a venture should start off as austere as possible, and investors should come in later, when a business is kicking butt. How Not to Get Burned by Outsourcing The Torens also take on outsourcing, from the pros and cons of using someone who not only never visits your office, but exists only in an email and Skype world. The book lays out the pros and cons of having employees vs. using contractors, and makes a compelling argument for hiring freelancers to work remotely. The writers understand that there’s a treasure trove of benefits to finding an outsider who not only does fantastic work, but saves money by charging less for services. If you’re not sure where to find someone trustworthy, the Torens provide solid resources at the back of the book. Your Business Is Flatlining: What to Do Next? When most books cover the exuberant highs of running your own shop, few tackle what to do when a business fails. The truth is, even armed with a brilliant vision and an excellent, focused strategy, there’s still that risk that your business will never catch on, and you’ll face an ever-dwindling stash of cash. The Torens not only address this dire scenario, but list some very insightful and realistic things you can do to possibly save your business, from bringing on an expert to doing an in-depth reevaluation of every facet of your startup. With so much material backed up by real-life examples from entrepreneurs, Small Business, Big Vision is a must for laying the framework for a new or existing business. For years, the Torens have been top consultants and mentors for small businesses the world over, and their impressive skills show in the pages of this quick-read book.


Read More
The Internet Industry Opposes SOPA: Is It Too Late?

The Internet Industry Opposes SOPA: Is It Too Late?

Beyond • December 2, 2011

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) is House Bill number 3261 and is unquestionably one of the most misguided and potentially dangerous pieces of internet legislation ever proposed by the US Congress. SOPA’s aims are to force ISPs, search engines, payment processors and ad networks to block access to any website deemed by any judge to be a “rogue.” Unfortunately, many judges have shown an appalling ignorance of the most basic functions of the internet. If Supreme Court Justice John Roberts can ask “what is the difference between email and a pager?” then the legislation is up for overwhelming misinterpretation and heavy-handed enforcement by a gaggle of lower judges in any given district in America. The leading hardware and software corporations have finally taken a stand against SOPA, but their prolonged dawdling may have rendered their opposition futile. Unintended Consequences The Business Software Alliance (BSA), which counts among its heavyweight members companies such as Apple, Microsoft, Intel and Adobe, recently issued a statement opposing SOPA in its current form, stating that it “needs work” before it should be implemented as the law of the land. Warning that the legislation “as it now stands… could sweep in more than just truly egregious actors,” the BSA went on to state that “the bill would have to balance key innovation, privacy and security considerations with the need to thwart the threat rogue websites pose,” as current “SOPA provisions might have unintended consequences.” The tone adopted by the BSA was in stark contrast to statements of just a week earlier when the Alliance offered support to the Act. The Current Copyright-Violating Web Is Untenable The vast majority of sober and level-headed internet observers have to admit that the current situation where movies, TV shows, music albums and other copyrighted content becomes freely available within nanoseconds of their release is untenable. Entertainment content is produced at high expense with an expectation that the venture will produce a profit, and it is simply not feasible to spend $100 million-plus on a media production just to give it away for free. However, the BSA is finally realizing that the impact of SOPA is too draconian to contemplate. Croon Elvis & Commit a Felony Let’s assume in a SOPA universe that your garage band creates a YouTube video where you’re playing an Elvis, Beatles or Lady Gaga tune. Congratulations, you have just committed a felony. We’re not discussing a slap-on-the-hand simple fine situation but a crime comparable to arson, robbery, or burglary. This is not for playing a copyrighted video clip from the original artist, but just strumming out their chords on your $50 guitar while crooning the lyrics! The liability is not limited to criminal charges against your band alone, as SOPA levies responsibility against the carrier of the copyright-infringing content, so YouTube can legitimately be blocked from all US access. Given that if all the copyright infringing videos on YouTube were removed there might be nothing left there but “awwww” videos of kittens, puppies and babies, it is clear that the internet industry needs to take a strong stance against this clear and present danger. Impossible Copyright Determinations SOPA’s limits are unknown and at least at this juncture, effectively unknowable. Is the use of a trademark word a SOPA violation? Would posting the statement “Let every Champion Pledge at this Time to be United in Joy and Cheer” be seen as violating six trademarks? Would every website that allows public posting be responsible for policing every element to ensure copyright adherence prior to making the content public? Although it’s obvious that the post of a full rip of the Puss In Boots movie is a copyright violation, how can anyone determine whether the soft music playing in the background of a video clip is under the jurisdiction of the RIAA or a tune the video creator composed and played? SOPA attempts to perform microsurgery with a sledgehammer, and the BSA’s previous support was nothing short of baffling. It seems that the internet industry has finally woken up to the threat posed by this Act… but it might be too little too late.


Read More
Landing Pages Explained: What, Why and How

Landing Pages Explained: What, Why and How

Beyond • November 30, 2011

Scenario A: A political group was relaunching their website and one of their primary aims was to have that site help the group generate money. After months of back and forth discussion between group members, one ace politician known for generating money strongly recommended they optimize their landing page. “What’s a landing page?” they asked. Scenario B: A giant Los Angeles based PR company needed to increase their client’s mailing list. They kept scratching their heads about it, wondering what would work best. The fact remains that while their team was highly intelligent, neither they nor the client was web savvy. They also didn’t know what a landing page was, why it mattered or how it could transform their campaign. For a political organization that survives on donations, it’s critical for them to use every tool possible to allow the widest monetary stream. A PR company needs to know marketing inside and out. The success of their client’s mailing list signup depends on how easy it is for site visitors to navigate to a signup form. So What Exactly Is a “Landing Page”? A landing page is essentially what page a person “docks” at when visiting your site. It’s the final page that requires a call to action. It’s often only associated with e-commerce sites, but every single company that has a web presence and hopes to attract customers needs to understand the blueprint of a landing page. When you’re in a physical establishment, there are signs and guides everywhere to help direct you where you need to go. In a digital world, it’s a lot more confusing, and well-drafted landing pages used strategically through email marketing, social media or home pages act as “guides” to get your customers where YOU want them to go. Once there, a landing page needs to be simple to understand with a clear call to action. It has to still “sell,” so you can’t get lazy when designing one. You have to utilize strategic marketing ideas, market research…in essence you have to understand your audience, what they want and what drives them, in order to get what you want from them. Whether it’s the sale or a mailing list sign up, you have to make it simple and worth their time to give you want you want. How Should I Design My Landing Page? Follow these tips to ensure you boost your landing page for maximum performance. Focus on one thing at a time – You may have a great product or service, but tooting all your offers at once only distracts and confuses your customers. The more time they have to weigh the options, the less likely they’ll pick one. Try focusing on just one thing at a time. Stay on point – Just like you shouldn’t be offering too many things at once, you also shouldn’t be filling your landing page visitor with too many details about you or your company. Again, be very specific. Don’t create a series of directions by linking them to other areas of interest. It’s a crumb trail they’re likely to follow, leaving the landing page offer completely forgotten about. Refer to point 1 here and focus on one campaign at a time. Remind them of the benefit – What is your customer going to get out of the transaction? What does signing up get them? Perhaps you can offer a free PDF, a discount or some other benefit or access that offers value in exchange for the sell or sign up. Make it easy for them to act – Respect that your end user is busy and doesn’t have time to sign up or hunt for the transaction point. Make it easy for them by being very clear where they have to sign up or how they can make a purchase. The more they have to look, the more steps they have to go through, the higher the chances that your campaign will suffer and likely fail. Keep graphics simple and in step with the tone of your site and service/product. Too many graphics are distracting. The wrong kinds of graphics or “boring” graphics don’t entice customers to bite, and too few graphics doesn’t inspire confidence or a sense of vision for where you’re going or what you want them to feel from the transaction.


Read More
10 Ways to Make Business Team Collaborations Painless

10 Ways to Make Business Team Collaborations Painless

Beyond • November 23, 2011

The idea of telecommuting teams is the norm now. These days, many companies opt in on departments working remotely and on hiring outside contractors. Now add to that equation the fact that people no longer need to be in a traditional office to get work done and that many teams find it advantageous to work with the best teams from all corners of the country. There are clearly a lot of benefits in collaborative team work, but also a number of problems that both managers and employees of any generation must learn to adjust to with greater frequency. Common problems include time zone differences, lack of accountability and basic miscommunication problems that come with not being able to see or work from the same document. However, collaborative teamwork doesn’t have to be like pulling teeth. It can be a painless transaction that’s beneficial to all involved parties with these tips. 1. Assembling Your Team – You can thwart most problems by making sure they never happen in the first place. Do this by choosing your team carefully. You need team members with experience, ones you can trust to work on your side even when you’re not there. 2. Meeting Face to Face - Invest in web conferencing software to make sure you’re able to meet no matter where you are. You can also make use of clever apps to simultaneously work on a project. 3. Don’t Complicate the Process – I cannot stress this enough. The more people are involved the more mangers want to see some kind of progress sheet/report letting them know what’s been going on. That’s fine. What’s not fine is requiring every little detail to be included/updated, which only wastes valuable hours. You hired the right people; trust that they’ll do the job without you having to micromanage everything – you’re only going to be wasting everyone’s time. 4. Trust the Professionals – If you’ve assembled the right team then you know you’ve recruited people who excel in their field…and you have to step back and recognize that you don’t know that field as well as they do. This is often true for any team collaborations that involve graphic designers, engineers or data analysts. Their jobs are technical, and having to break it down to someone who lacks their level of experience or background education is only going to frustrate the project. 5. Invest in Email Communication – Emails are the fastest way to communicate and get the job done, so you should invest in email updates and communication as often as needed. Weekly reports and minor conference conversations can also be conducted via email. This is especially helpful if team members are traveling and/or in different time zones. 6. Set Goals – Setting goals is important for long-term projects. When setting goals, try and keep realistic goals in mind in order to not get discouraged about a project’s progress. 7. Establish Ranks – Every team member should know who to go to for what. There should always be a pecking order established. Make sure that when involving 3 or more separate teams that you’re not ending up with too many middlemen that cost the team time and effort playing telephone with any updates or questions. 8. Communication Management – The longer a project goes on, and the more teams/members that are involved, the more confusing it’s all likely to get. This means that along the way, critical team members who may have their attention diverted on other projects will easily forget what was agreed upon or what step the project was currently at. Avoid this by making sure someone plays secretary and keeps tabs on the conversations and agreements. This person should also send out a weekly project update highlighting where the team is at now, any prior benchmarks and anticipated goals. 9. Document Management – There will be a lot of documents going back and forth, whether it’s through mail, fax or electronic signatures. Make sure someone keeps all those documents together in one place. 10. Reward the Results – Team collaborations require a lot of hard work, a huge commitment that often exceeds time and effort spent working alone or even in one location. Make sure that milestones and successful yields are rewarded appropriately. Get together when possible, but offer public thanks, recommendations and gratitude where appropriate. If you’re lucky enough to have found a successful team, you’re going to want to use them again – so make sure you leave people wanting to work with you in the future.


Read More
3 Ways to Build Your Brand with Online Videos (and Pizza)

3 Ways to Build Your Brand with Online Videos (and Pizza)

Beyond • November 14, 2011

Internet marketers are probably all too familiar with Chicago’s Domino’s Pizza legend Ramon DeLeon, but for those of you out of the loop, here’s a bit of back story. DeLeon has been a true entrepreneur of Internet marketing through his honest and innovative use of social media and Internet video. The result of his strategy has been a huge boost in brand awareness and improved revenue for his Domino’s Pizza stores, which is certainly tough to do in what can arguably be considered the pizza capital of the world. The following article takes a look at some of the effective uses of Internet video pioneered by DeLeon, and how such approaches could benefit your brand, business or blog. 1) Connections Come First Internet video has long been used to promote products and services, but how often do you use Internet video to build a connection? In fact how often do you use Internet video to build a connection with one individual? I don’t mean a collective “one,” I mean a real, singular member of the average general public. I bet the answer is “Seldom to never.” DeLeon made this idea of connecting with that one individual a vital component to his online strategy, in this video to a customer created the morning after an order went awry: http://www.viddler.com/explore/dpzramon/videos/19/. That particular example has been shown around the world and viewed by over fifteen thousand online users. It’s not just small regional businesses either who have gotten wise to this effective video technique. Old Spice took to this idea with gusto: . Building a connection is far more powerful and far more effective than trying to create a quick sale. By taking the time and money to extend thanks, apologies or even just saying hey to online users, you can make a connection with that user for life. These instances not only create a lasting connection between brand and customer, but also spread a huge amount of conversation and word of mouth online promotion. 2) Video Apologies Work DeLeon’s clip shows a great business-to-customer communication between himself, his colleague and a dissatisfied consumer. For a business of any size to take the time out to apologize to one individual customer is exceptional. The level of customer service this provides and the representation of how important any one customer is to the brand is fantastic. This will undoubtedly spark online interaction and increase brand awareness for both DeLeon and Domino’s Pizza. Now this is not just a regional concept, nor is it always a one-to-one exchange. Sony for instance apologized publicly to thousands of event attendees and thousands of online viewers, for the downtime their Playstation Network suffered a while back, and here’s how they did it: . I’d like to draw your attention to some of the comments these uses of apologetic videos received. Domino’s Pizza (DeLeon): Playstation (Sony): Both videos received thousands of views and have been talked about across the world on and off the web. Admitting to a mistake, addressing it in a timely manner and focusing that apology on your audience is a powerful way to restart the conversation about your business. Its power, ultimately, is a reflection of its authenticity. Create real solutions and take genuine care in their presentation. 3) Create an Internet Video Presence Internet video is one of the most popular forms of media on the web, so it’s little surprise that a good one is quickly shared across websites and social platforms. Being a part of this media by making engaging and interactive video content can quickly put you into a position to have your content spread across the web too. Our celebrated Pizza guy DeLeon created engaging content by connecting with his customers whether they were satisfied or dissatisfied, but there are many other ways to make influential video content. Creating tutorials, instructional videos, interactive videos, webinars, streamed live events or just creating entertaining content could help you to build a strong online presence in both the video community and the social community. Generating this sort of presence for your brand, business or blog will certainly put you on the fast track to boosting revenue, increasing website traffic, creating higher levels of website traffic and building up your social networks. These three online video practices can help you build your brand, engage customers and authenticate your business. What are some of the ways that you or your company have used online videos to market your brand? Share in the comments below!


Read More
1 2 3