Tags: Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer

List Segmentation: Gender

List Segmentation: Gender

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 30, 2018

We begin discussing the various ways you can segment your lists with the ways you can use gender to your favor. We also talk about the potential reasons not to use gender as a segmentation factor. You can be the judge. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer, we\'re gonna continue focusing on segmentation, and just talking about all of the different ways you can get to know your subscribers and pay attention to what they\'re doing so that you can be sending them the best possible email marketing messages. And it can all start with your sign-up forms. We spent weeks talking about how you grow your list. Well, with all those sign-up forms and all of those different touch-points we\'ve talked about, the fields you have in those sign-up forms can help you start your segmentation from the very beginning. And the first way we\'re gonna talk about is by gender. 01:00 Daniel Miller: So, when somebody fills out a sign-up form, in some cases, when it\'s relevant, you may wanna ask what is their gender. This specifically works really well for clothing stores, retail stores, and so forth, \'cause it helps you later on to market to the customer with the specific products that they may be interested in. Now, one thing that I highly recommend is just because somebody said that they were a female don\'t just send them clothes that relate to female or articles that are related to female \'cause you never know. It may be a female looking to buy for their partner, something like that. 01:33 AS: It\'s 2018, they might just prefer that style of clothing. 01:37 DM: That as well, [chuckle] absolutely. So always make sure to check when you segment for a specific thing. You wanna start slow and kinda get your feet wet and test it out, and don\'t go 100% certain on anything before you fully test it. 01:53 AS: Yeah, and aside from the type of products, because Daniel mentioned the reasons why you may not wanna limit the types of things you\'re showing to each gender, but it can also come down to the tone of voice you\'re using or the language you\'re using or how you\'re speaking to those people, whether it\'s boys or girls that may vary from time to time. 02:13 DM: Absolutely. And even the simple fact of... I mean, pretty much what you said, it\'s 2018 and a lot of this is changing. This may be old school still, but even the colors. And like you\'re saying, the voice, that can really make a big difference. Also when it comes down to values and what each gender may also stand for. Again, 2018, things are changing a lot. I agree with it, I think that it needs to go this way, it\'s long overdue, but let\'s focus on email marketing for this podcast. Pretty much going back to... I think what we\'re really pushing here is you wanna be as relevant as you possibly can to your subscriber. The more you can do that, the more engagement you\'re gonna receive. 02:57 AS: Absolutely. And we\'ve given a few different examples and being as woke as we can to this specific topic as we are two white males and having this conversation, but you\'ll see if it\'s working or not in your reports. And that\'s for a conversation much further down the line, but when you\'re doing any of these different types of segmentation, you\'re gonna see if it\'s working. You\'re gonna see if the clicks are increasing or decreasing, you\'re gonna see if the open rate is working based on the way you\'re saying things in your subject line, just like we\'re saying. If you wanna try and tailor your text to men or women, you\'ll see if that\'s working in your results. So, with segmentation, pay attention to if it\'s working in your reports and stay tuned \'cause we\'re gonna dive deep into that later. But, as we\'ve said, gender is the first one we\'re gonna talk about. There\'s a lot more, but it all begins with the fields you have in your sign-up forms, and it\'s as simple as a little check box for male or female if you are gonna do marketing like that, it\'s gonna help you get started with segmenting your list. And we\'ll catch you next time when we talk about the next type of segmentation that you can start straight from your sign-up forms. Thanks for listening.  


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Know Your Subscribers: Segmentation

Know Your Subscribers: Segmentation

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 29, 2018

Part of getting to know your subscribers is not treating them all as if they\'re the same person. That\'s where segmentation comes into play. Discover the ways you can sort your subscribers into groups that will let you send targeted, relevant content to each segment. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re gonna continue our conversation talking about knowing your subscribers and the way you do that is with segmentation. We danced around saying it in the last episode, \'cause we knew we have a whole lot of segmentation coming up, but we\'re talking about all the different ways you can do it, but this episode is gonna be what it even is. So what is segmentation, Daniel? 00:44 Daniel Miller: So, when it comes to the segmentation, I\'m sure we all have the signup form on our site. Everybody starts filling that out, but the question is, does everybody really... It\'s not a one-size-fits-all. So by segmenting your list of subscribers or customers, you can really start to kinda build a personalized experience for that type of person. What I mean by that is you can segment your subscribers based on interests, maybe based on their demographic, you can also maybe segment your subscribers based on previous purchase history or activity on your emails and site. There\'s a million different ways that you can segment your list, but the bottom line is the reason why you wanna segment is so you\'re as relevant as you possibly can be with each of your subscribers. 01:31 AS: Absolutely, and it really doesn\'t even matter what you\'re selling. And we mentioned this before, you probably have a wide array of products or services that you\'re offering and each customer is gonna be a little bit different. You don\'t sell to 100 clones of the same person, or more. It\'s different based on each different group and segment that you create and the thing you need to do, as an email marketer, to not seem clueless when you\'re sending out those emails, is to understand what those differences are and get to know those people. And like we mentioned in the last episode, those are real humans on the other side of those email addresses. And you need to start to understand things about those people. Daniel mentioned creating the persona of your subscribers. Download a picture, put it on the wall, look at that and write to that kind of group of person but take it even deeper. I mean, think about what does this person drive? What kind of food do they like to eat? Where do they shop for clothes? Any of those things... What blogs do they read? Any of those things are gonna help you understand that segment of your list and get to know how you can do your email marketing to that segment even better. 02:42 DM: Absolutely, and I say this all the time. I mean, any product or service, there\'s a million competitors out there. It\'s a rare case in this day and age that there\'s one company doing one specific thing. And because of that, a lot of people, because they have so many choices, they\'re gonna wanna choose the company that they feel that speaks to them, whether that\'s based on the design, based on the values, whatever that is, they\'re really gonna start to split hairs in that kind of way. So again, the more you can adapt to that and the more relevant you can be by segmenting your list, can be very helpful. And that\'s at the top of the funnel level. Once they\'re actually engaging with you, segmenting takes a whole new level of engagement to really make sure that when your subscribers subscribes to your emails, they\'re not just getting a generic email that everyone else is getting, you\'re providing a custom experience for them that adds value to the experience with you, so. 03:38 AS: Absolutely. And just to continue on ways in which you can understand each segment of your list, think about it in a way of, \"What problem am I solving for this group of people?\" Because based on what you have, you\'re a toy company maybe it\'s, \"Hey, I like that these toys are educational,\" Or some parents are like, \"I just need them to not bother me for a little while,\" or whatever that is. It\'s you\'re solving different problems and you can speak to them in that way, in that segment, to make sure you\'re doing great relevant email marketing. So what would an example of this be, Daniel? 04:10 DM: An example of something for a specific problem... Well, here\'s an example. Okay, and this is based on maybe a buying behavior, right. Let\'s say that I own a pool store and somebody comes in and they buy a bag of chlorine for their pool. And I know that that bag of chlorine is gonna last about six months, right? I may not wanna put that person in the same stream of emails of all my other people that are getting different promotions. I may wanna create a specific segment for that person, that relates to people that have bought pool products related to chlorine and I know that that chlorine bag lasts about six months, in five-and-a-half months an email may shoot out to that person, with maybe a discount or a special promotion for their next bag of chlorine. The bottom line of what you\'re trying to do there is you\'re trying to relate to their experience and you\'re trying to engage with them in such a level that they know that you understand exactly their needs so they\'re gonna come back to shop with you in the future. 05:09 AS: Definitely. Another example is say you\'re a pet shop. There\'s cat people and there\'s dog people. And sure, there\'s some people at the center of that Venn diagram that spend their days watching YouTube videos of different types of animals being friends that you wouldn\'t expect and they might love both cat and dog information, but overall, if you\'re a cat person, you don\'t care about the new dog toys or dog food or dog treats, or leashes, just as dog owners don\'t care about the scratch pads or catnip or whatever else cat people like. I\'m a dog person, so I don\'t... That\'s the end of my cat interest list. But if you\'re sending the right, relevant information to those, that\'s how you\'re gonna make sales and that\'s why we\'re an email marketer insurance to create relationships with your customers, and that\'s how you\'re gonna do it, by making them feel heard and seen in your email marketing. 06:00 DM: Yeah, exactly. 06:01 AS: All right, we\'ll catch you guys next time as we continue this conversation and start to talk about the different types of segmentation that you could be doing.    


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Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: CTA

Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: CTA

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 27, 2018

This is the last episode in our conversation on growing your list. We move onto the next topic after this one. Last, and certainly not least, for growing your list is the Call To Action. You need to create a sense of urgency, use action words and more to ensure you\'ve gained a new subscriber. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back. Today, we\'re gonna wrap up our conversation for now on growing your email list, and that focus that we\'ve been on the last couple on writing compelling copy as a way to grow your list on those sign-up forms. And what we\'re gonna talk about today is a call to action. 00:39 Daniel Miller: Yeah, so the call to action on a sign-up form is, of course, the button that they have to click on to finally submit that form. And as I say submit, I wanna tell you, humans are not computers. When you say submit, eh, they may not register with that right away. Something like sign up, yes, I want this, something like that, that may have you stand out from the rest of the competitors that are out there. So those are just a few examples before we really dig into CTA\'s calls to action. 01:07 AS: Yeah, that\'s a good point. I think the default is submit, but that sounds like you\'re trying to get someone to bend to your will, [chuckle] or even like a join us, that could get a little culty. Yeah, I\'m thinking about how someone\'s gonna do that, and what\'s gonna make them want to do it. If you can do it in a way like, One of my favorite bands, when you go to their website and their sign-up form pops up, the two options are, \"Yes, I want more face-melting rock and roll,\" or \"No, I like my face where it currently is.\" Which are funny, it makes sense for the brand, but they do it in a way where it\'s like, yeah, I want face-melting rock and roll. If you can make that call to action and get someone excited about for what clicking that button means, that\'s what an effective call to action is. 01:58 DM: Again, what you just described right there, I think that is the perfect example of... When I picture somebody that\'s rock and roll, they\'re looking for face-melting rock and roll, right? If you just say yeah, sign me up, yeah, they\'ll probably get subscribers, but the face-melting rock and roll, you\'re speaking to your audience. And I think that\'s the biggest thing that you wanna do there, remember who you\'re speaking to and talk to them like they wanna be spoken to. I was just looking up on a site... Oh my goodness, I just lost it. But yeah, very similar to what Andy\'s saying. Don\'t just go with the default ones, try to figure out what is it... Put your buyer persona in your mind and talk to them at every point of contact on your website, and most importantly when they\'re filling out a form and about to submit it. 02:41 AS: Yeah. And the most beautiful design work you put into that web page into the sign-up form, it could look amazing. If it doesn\'t also have a compelling call to action, that CTA isn\'t there, all the work you did is for nothing. The design doesn\'t matter if the call to action isn\'t there to back it up. 03:01 DM: Yeah exactly. And I\'m trying to think what else we can really say about calls to action. One thing that I really like in case to action from other websites... And this is becoming more of a norm because of the security factors out there. For example, if you\'re with trustee, I believe that by default you have to have your terms of use next to any form that somebody is filling out, meaning next to the call to action. But that\'s also a very valuable piece of real estate, for you to say something like, \"We will not sell or share your information.\" Think of what fear your customer may have. Maybe it\'s, \"We promise we\'ll only send to you once per month.\" Whatever that is, that\'s also a really good opportunity right next to the call to action that\'s kind of supportive to what they\'re about to submit. So it\'s not necessarily the call to action, but it helps support somebody to feel confident to click on the call to action. 03:57 AS: Definitely. And just some other aspects of the call to action to consider is, make it action-oriented, so they feel like they need to act on it, like, \"Sign up today. Join us now.\" It\'s that sense of urgency that\'s gonna make them want to take action that\'s important. Make it big and clear. That font should be easy to read, you can\'t miss it. If you got a big blue button and tiny little white text in the middle of it, it\'s gonna look weird, one, but they\'re not gonna be able to easily read it. Think about those old people remotes that are giant with the giant numbers, that\'s really how the text needs to look on that call to action because, well, our CMO will probably laugh when she listens to this episode, but oftentimes in our meeting, we get a request from her to zoom in one more on a doc that we\'re all looking at on the projector, those things. And she loves to remind us that as we age we\'re gonna be in that camp, too, so it\'s important to remember that that anyone at any range is using the internet nowadays, so make that call to action easy-to-read. 05:01 AS: And last not least, test. We keep talking about testing. This is another opportunity. Even something that seems so small to you, to what you\'re call to action button on the sign-up form says can make huge differences. If you have great automations that trigger once someone signs up through a sign-up form and you\'re converting crazy amounts of sales in that automation, something as small as upping the percentage of people on your page that sign up on that sign-up form can mean huge dollars and cents for your business. So test out what that copy is, what you\'re writing, to make a compelling call to action to sign up to your email list, because it\'s gonna pay off for you in the end. 05:44 DM: Yeah. And not just the copy on the call to action as well, but the visual of it, make sure that it stands out. If you have a white background, don\'t do a transparent call to action with just a border. Don\'t forget, this is kind of more of getting into a discussion with your design team and marketing team. The marketing team wants the action to happen, the design team wants it to look good. Find that middle balance there, but make sure that the call to action stands out so your subscribers don\'t miss it. 06:13 AS: Definitely. And this concludes our whole section on growing your list. I\'m sure we\'ll revisit at some point in the hopefully very long history of this podcast, but for now we\'re gonna move on to the next topic, which is now that you\'ve put in all the work to grow your list, let\'s start to understand your subscribers and get to know who they are. And so we\'re gonna launch an entire conversation about that in the next several episodes. Thanks for sticking to us about this section, and we\'ll catch you next time.


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Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Incentive

Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Incentive

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 24, 2018

Another important aspect of the words you use for your signup form is the incentive. Potential subscribers need to understand the value in opting into your list. Tell them what they have to look forward to! 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re gonna continue talking about writing compelling copy as a way to grow your list on those sign-up forms, and the aspects of it we\'re gonna focus on this time is the incentive. Daniel kinda alluded to it last time, but it\'s making sure that you\'re making a convincing argument for signing up for your sign-up form. 00:41 Daniel Miller: Exactly. So we are overlapping in a lot of these episodes here, but the reason why we\'re doing that is because we\'re talking a lot about the similar things, but we\'re giving a slightly different perspective and trying to give you different ideas as to what your customer may be going through or what you may be going through. So when it comes to the right incentive, I can\'t say this enough, but it\'s adding value. And, again, if that is the little bit of push that they need to finalize that purchase or it\'s the little bit of push that they may need to earn... I\'m sorry, for you to earn trust, whatever that is, what is the value that you\'re giving your subscriber in exchange of the email address? We\'ve talked about if you have a restaurant, if you have a retail store, sometimes the discount, the coupon, the buy one get one free kinda deal, those help a lot to give that last push to get them back into your door. If you are a service, you may need to earn a little bit more trust. So whatever that is, I think it\'s important for every company to do their own testing and to figure out, \"Okay, people that tend to come to the pricing page, they think it\'s too expensive. So how can we have a pop-up form that\'s an exit intent, whatever that is, that addresses that problem that the visitor has?\" 01:51 AS: Yeah. Like we\'ve talked about before, it\'s easing any of those frictions, anxieties, whatever a potential customer might have, and erasing those for them. So if you\'re explaining the incentive of drawing that list, it\'s the same thing of erasing any \"Oh, I don\'t wanna hear or get emails every day or twice a day,\" or whatever that is, it\'s the incentive of, \"Hey, we\'re not gonna bug you more than once a month or once a week,\" or whatever that is. 02:18 DM: And stick to that. I\'ve had companies before that say, \"We will bug you but once a month,\" then before I know it, they\'ve added me to six other lists, and it\'s... Yeah, that\'s not fun. That gives me a bad taste in mouth. 02:27 AS: Exactly. So what you just wanna do is let them know that there\'s a benefit for that action of subscribing. It\'s gonna pay off to them, and then tell them why and what that is, and what they\'re gonna benefit from. And as we mentioned before, make sure it\'s something that makes sense, and like we said, don\'t just... Not a free iPad or a free Apple Watch, or whatever that is, because that\'s gonna be everybody, but it\'s gonna be something that is of value to the type of customers you\'re trying to attract. And just telling them why they should care to sign up for what you\'ve got. 03:00 DM: Exactly. To give you a good example... And by the way, I wanna go back and I wanna say something \'cause we have been talking a lot about coupons and discounts. Something to mention as well, it\'s not always about discounting your product, that incentive may also be, \"Hey, let us show you the value here.\" It\'s not just about providing a discount, \'cause if you set a price, I\'m sure there\'s a good reason as to why you put that price there, and I\'m sure you have staff and servers or a brick and mortar store that you need to pay for. So not always discounts is a good idea, but also that incentive can be flipped to say, \"Hey, if you\'re not convinced about the value here, boy, do we have some case studies to show you, do we have examples, do we... \" Schedule a one-on-one demo, whatever that could be, add the incentive to show the value. 03:46 AS: Exactly, and I\'m gonna run down just the steps you should take in writing this copy, in explaining your incentive, how to do that. So tell them why they should care, make it loud and clear, don\'t hide the value in there, it should be on the forefront. Explain to them exactly how they\'re gonna benefit from it, whether it\'s get a demo and answer all your questions, or this webinar that\'s gonna teach you this, this PDF that\'s gonna help you do this. Make it very obvious to them why they need to give you your email address. And don\'t be vague about it, don\'t keep them guessing. You\'re gonna kinda hit them over the head with the value, and that\'s the way you\'re gonna get them to subscribe. 04:27 DM: Yep. 04:27 AS: Alright, thanks everyone for listening. We\'ve got one more episode where we\'re gonna talk about writing compelling copy to grow the list, and that\'s gonna conclude this section, for now, on focusing on growing your email list. It\'ll be our first 21 episodes, which is exciting, we\'re off to a great start. We appreciate all of you for listening, and we\'ll catch you next time.


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8/24/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

8/24/18: Weekly Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer Digest

Beyond • August 24, 2018

Hey everybody! Sorry I missed last week\'s digest. To be fair, it was in the name of love. We kept the episodes rolling every weekday, while I was in Chicago for a couple of weddings. The good news is, my best man speech went well ... and we\'re back with the blog digest of our most recent episodes of the Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer podcast (my employers may question the order I placed those in). Growing a List: Location Location! Location! Location! We talked about the importance of timing last episode, but one factor in that timing is where on the page a signup form is located. Do you want your form above-the-fold, in the sidebar or the footer? Listen to find out. Growing a List: Popup vs. Standard Embed Signup Forms In this episode, we talk about the times you\'ll want to use a popup signup form or a standard embeddable one. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each. Learn when to employ each of them to grow your list. Growing a List: Exit-Intent Signup Forms If a visitor leaves your website without subscribing to your list, they may be gone for good. Don\'t let that happen! Catch them on their way out the door with an exit-intent signup form. Learn how in this episode. Growing a List: Freebies, Discounts & Special Offers Last episode we talked about the exit-intent signup form. There are a few different approaches you can take with that strategy. This episode discusses using them to offer freebies, discounts and special offers. Growing a List: Shopping Cart We continue talking about the different types of exit-intent pop-up forms by discussing the shopping cart. If someone places an item in your eCommerce shopping cart but doesn\'t make a purchase, you can catch them on the way out with a popup signup form. Then you can follow-up afterward to convince them to complete their purchase. Growing a List: Related Products Sometimes, consumers don\'t know what they don\'t know. They may have come to your site without knowing what they should be looking for, found something similar, but not exactly what they wanted. So, they give up and click to exit your site. Enter the Related Products Exit-Intent Popup Signup Form. Growing a List: Feedback The last of the exit-intent popup signup forms that we discuss is one for receiving feedback. If you ask a site visitor for feedback on their experience on your website, you may find out why they didn\'t decide to make a purchase. It will make your customers feel valued as well. Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice In addition to touch points and timing, the words you put on your signup form matter when it comes to growing your list. Part of that is the tone or personality that your words carry. That\'s what is called the \"voice\" of your copy.


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Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice

Writing Compelling Copy to Grow a List: Voice

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 23, 2018

In addition to touch points and timing, the words you put on your signup form matter when it comes to growing your list. Part of that is the tone or personality that your words carry. That\'s what is called the \"voice\" of your copy. 00:21 Andy Shore: Welcome back, everybody. We\'re continuing our conversation about the focus on growing your email list. And for this next few episodes, we\'re gonna talk about what goes into writing a good sign-up form. And the reason that writing is an important aspect of a sign-up form, we talked about all the touchpoints, we talked about the timing, writing is kind of the third aspect to that because that\'s how they\'re interacting with your sign-up forms. They\'re gonna read what it says right there on there, you need to know how to do that well in order to make sure that... You can do timing right, you can do the touchpoints right, but if that last point isn\'t there, they might fall out before finishing that subscription. 01:02 Daniel Miller: Exactly. And what we\'ve been talking about earlier in the previous episodes, add value, that\'s the most important thing. Make sure the potential subscriber, I\'m not gonna call them a subscriber yet, the potential subscriber knows what the value is that they\'re getting in exchange of their email. If you just say, \"Sign up,\" what am I signing up for? Is this offers? Is this newsletters? Is this daily? Is it weekly? Is it monthly? Those are the type of questions that your subscriber is gonna have in their mind. Try to answer those. 01:31 AS: Yeah, and it\'s important to remember you\'re not just talking one-on-one, this is a sign-up form that anyone who comes to your website is gonna see. So whereas you\'re gonna be segmenting that list later on and get to have a little more individualized, personalized content, this needs to run the gamut for every type of visitor that\'s gonna get to your website. And as we talked about with the different touchpoints there, there\'s different sign-up forms, but each individual type of sign-up form is gonna have to have copy that it works for anyone who gets that page. And so the first factor that you gotta consider in writing the sign-up form is the voice you\'re doing that in. And it\'s not talking in weird voices, which I said earlier, I\'m not gonna do impressions, so I\'m not gonna just start talking in different voices now just to make you laugh, I\'ll try and do that in every other way. But focusing on the voice, and that\'s just the way you write, the personality that your words have. 02:27 DM: Yeah, and number one thing is don\'t be boring. There\'s like we\'ve said, there\'s so much competition out there. You wanna try to make sure your voice matches your brand, first of all. And second of all, that it speaks to the customer. So it\'s very different for if you say, \"Hey, check this out,\" or something like, \"Thanks for stopping by, would you like to check this out?\" One\'s a little bit more impersonal, but both of them have a different type of voice that may speak to a different type of person, right? 02:55 AS: Yeah, and to that point, you gotta remember, yes, in ones and zeros and in the digital sense of it, you\'re just getting an email address, but the reality is there\'s a person behind that email address. So one thing we do is we create buyer personas and different things to where we understand how we need to do our marketing towards those people. This is another aspect of that. Picture the person you\'re writing the sign-up form and the way you would talk to that person because that\'s the voice that your sign-up form should have is the way you talk to that person you\'re seeing in your mind\'s eye that is that potential subscriber that\'s right then and there. How do you talk to that person? You don\'t wanna sound like a robot or a machine, it\'s a human talking to a human, even though it\'s all happening on the computer. 03:43 DM: Exactly, and if you have different buyer personas, think about setting maybe different areas of your website that speaks to that different buyer persona, and then the sign-up form can better adjust to that type of voice. Right? I think Geico when they had this, \"Save 15 minutes or more,\" they had different types of ad. And I think... And I\'m sorry, this is way back when they were starting that out, and you could tell they were trying to figure out who is their buyer. And they had these different buyer personas with the same message, \"Save 15\". Some were really funny, some were serious, some were just like, what in the world did I just watch? And now they kind of landed in something in the middle that still addresses to the right type of person that\'s looking for the insurance company, and they\'re looking to save and so forth. But again, it was really interesting to see them do those different advertisements and test to figure out what was that overall buyer persona. For you, if you don\'t know who your buyer persona is yet, you may just wanna try to do testing first, but it\'s... The one thing that people tend to try to do is they look outward to try to find the buyer persona. Flip that around, look inward, who are you and who is the customer that you would wanna deal with? Times that by 1000, and there you go. 04:55 AS: Definitely. And as you\'re testing that out and doing the different things, you\'re staying true to your brand voice. If your brand can naturally and organically work in some humor, some wit, then do that, but don\'t do it trying to... There\'s nothing worse than a brand trying to be funny. You\'re either actually funny or don\'t go that route. You could be informational and educational, you can be sincere and cause the feels, whatever it is, elicit the emotions that fit your brand because otherwise it\'s not gonna be something that makes sense to those different personas. 05:30 DM: Yeah. If I were to be on Bank of America\'s website and they say, \"What\'s up, bro? You looking to subscribe?\" I would be worried that they got hacked. 05:38 AS: Yeah. You don\'t wanna keep your money with a bank that\'s calling you, \"Bro\". [chuckle] That\'s a rule I\'m putting out there. It doesn\'t involve email marketing, but we hope you learn that from this podcast, too. We\'re gonna pick back up with writing compelling copy to help you grow your list with the next couple of episodes. Thanks, everyone for tuning in. Goodbye.


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Growing a List: Feedback

Growing a List: Feedback

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 22, 2018

00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back to Clues for the Clueless Email Marketer, we\'re wrapping up our conversation about exit intent pop-up forms and how they relate to growing your email list. And this last one, we\'re gonna talk about is a feedback request. 00:36 Daniel Miller: Yeah, so a feedback request, I think now more than ever, where data is so prevalent in our lives, feedback is essential. If you aren\'t collecting feedback, oh, I don\'t know what to tell you. Find a way to do it because you can get so much information that was right there in front of you and you didn\'t know \'cause you didn\'t ask. So feedback is very important. Now, how does an exit intent form come to play into getting feedback? Well, like we just said in the previous episode, when people are searching for products on your site, they may not find it, they may go to exit out of your website. That\'s a great moment to show a pop-up form to ask them, \"Hey, did you not find what you were looking for? Please tell us so we can improve.\" You\'re doing two things there. As we mentioned, you\'re getting the email address to engage with them, as well as you\'re learning how to improve your website and overall buying experience. 01:25 DM: The other thing that we can use a feedback request form on, and this one, I wouldn\'t do it for every single time that this happens, but if somebody completes a purchase, they get to that thank you page. Maybe ask them about that buying cycle, how was the cart process for them and get feedback. Again, you are achieving two things, you are getting feedback from a customer, and you\'re getting an email to somebody that you can maybe create an automation for, to then ask them to write a public review somewhere else. 01:53 AS: Yeah, definitely. And like Daniel was saying, depending on where they encounter in the process, it\'s helping a new customer feel special and that they\'re valued. It\'s like, \"Hey, we appreciate what you have to say. Not just that you\'re a customer, we\'re always gonna thank you and appreciate you for that, but we value you to the extent that we wanna hear your opinion. So tell us what this process was like. How can we improve it? How can we make this better for you?\" That it\'s gonna make those customers you\'ve just got feel even more important or if it comes earlier in the process, and... The best feedback you get sometimes is from the angry people. We\'ve read the ask book and it talks about you wanna hear from those passionate people, whether they\'re real happy or real angry either way. That\'s the most valuable feedback you\'re getting. So maybe they were attracted to your site through an ad or through SEO or something that brought them in, but it wasn\'t exactly what they were looking for. And they might not be thrilled or maybe they just wanna tell you that, you\'re gonna understand the type of people you\'re attracting to your website and maybe the work you need to put in in certain other areas to make sure you\'re attracting your core customer. 03:01 DM: Yeah, and one thing that I wanna point out. Timing is everything with this one as well. What I mean by that is... Well, I guess, because we\'re talking about an exit intent, that makes sense, but this whole conversation brought me back to, I forget what website I was on, but I was blown away that they actually did this. It was a site, we could say a company as big as like a Microsoft, something like that. And I was on their website, and I literally just landed on it. And it said give us feedback on our website. It\'s like, \"Guys, I just landed on here. Are you seriously asking me to give you feedback on your website? Well, the feedback is don\'t give me this pop-up until at least I\'ve browsed through it,\" right? So when it comes down to it, I think the exit intent is good here because it\'s as they\'re leaving, you\'re asking for that feedback. Do not try to do something, do not ask for feedback as soon as they get in. If you wanna do a different type of pop-up and ask for feedback, try to set the rule to somebody that\'s visited at least five to 10 pages, something like that, to where they\'re actually gonna give you feedback that matters, not somebody that just landed on your home page and you\'re already asking for feedback. 04:03 AS: Definitely. And so just to recap what we\'ve been talking about with these exit intent forms, we\'ve talked about the reason for doing them is it\'s that last-ditch effort, last line of defense, Hail Mary, whatever other cliche we wanna throw in there that that effort, it\'s just gonna... As someone\'s walking out the door, leaving your website, you\'re gonna try and lasso them back in with this exit intent form. And you might wanna do that with freebies, discounts, special offers and if they\'re about to leave your shopping cart to make the sale right then and there or be able to follow up with an abandoned email, doing it with related products, in case they didn\'t find what they were looking for, and last but not least, as we\'ve been talking about this episode, to get feedback. So there\'s a lot of value in an exit intent form, a lot of ways to help you grow your list. We hope you explore them and tell us how you\'re using that on social media at @benchmarkemail. We wanna hear all about it. Our interns will be thrilled, you\'re chatting with them too. Thanks, everyone for listening and we\'ll catch you next time.


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Growing a List: Related Products

Growing a List: Related Products

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 21, 2018

Sometimes, consumers don\'t know what they don\'t know. They may have come to your site without knowing what they should be looking for, found something similar, but not exactly what they wanted. So, they give up and click to exit your site. Enter the Related Products Exit-Intent Popup Signup Form. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody to Clues to the clueless email marketer. We\'re still talking about exit intent pop up forms and growing your list. And this specific exit intent form we\'re gonna talk about today is a related products one, so if someone\'s on one of your product pages, didn\'t even get to the shopping cart like we talked about with the last episode, but they\'re on your product pages, they\'re going through your e-commerce store, and they\'re deciding to click out. This is that last ditch effort another type of exit intent pop up form that\'s gonna present them in that moment. 00:55 Daniel Miller: Exactly. So this is really geared towards what would be e-commerce stores and really people that have really large stores, that you\'re trying to go through something, you can\'t quite find what you\'re looking for. I mean, here we\'re really bending it to say you probably have a different type of problem, which it\'s your store, I guess workflows, but guess what? With pop up forms, you can kind of figure out and test what is that problem. So a good example is, if someone is about to buy something... I\'m sorry, not about to buy something. They are on the product page and they\'re about to leave. You may wanna ask them like, \"Hey did you not find what you\'re looking for? Tell us what that was.\" And then that can maybe help you do two things, help you fix your overall site workflows, as well as get their email address for future communication. 01:43 AS: Yeah, like Daniel is saying, yes, it could be an issue with the workflow of your e-commerce store. It\'s always harder when you set something up, \'cause it makes sense to you, but when you have someone that comes in for the first time and doesn\'t know, you don\'t know what you don\'t know. So they don\'t know what they\'re missing, they may in their head know what it is they want, but don\'t know how to articulate that on your website or the right way to look for that. So if you come in when they\'re about to leave and say, \"Hey here are some things that are kind of like this that you might be interested in, then they\'re like, \"Oh that\'s exactly what I wanted. I didn\'t even know that\'s what it is, but here it is right in front of me. And like I said, they thought it was a lost cause but... And the next thing you know, they\'re clicking on that, adding it to your cart and onto the next step and it\'s really just because they didn\'t know what exactly to look for and you helped them do it with that exit intent pop-up form. 02:38 DM: Yeah. And I cannot emphasize enough on this. Be very careful with disturbing your subscriber or your site visitor that could potentially buy without anything. So this is where timing and location plays a lot here, so make sure that you\'re not disrupting them. Because if I\'m about to buy something and I get this pop form that\'s telling me go over here, find all that other stuff. I may just say, \"Well, this website is really trying to get you to buy stuff, I\'m gonna go somewhere else.\" Right? Versus allowing your subscriber to naturally do what it is that they\'re gonna do, and again, they\'re leaving, they\'re about to leave your website entirely, that\'s the time that this pop-up should happen. Of course, it\'s the exit pop up, but I just wanted to make sure to make a point of that so we don\'t confuse it with just a regular pop-up. 03:23 AS: Yeah, definitely. And another advantage of this type of exit intent form is, if you\'ve got a little more sophisticated marketing software that you\'re using for these exit intent forms and it\'s been tracking where someone went on your website. We talked a little bit about, maybe they didn\'t find what they were looking for, maybe they didn\'t see something they had kind of piqued their interest earlier on, and they\'ve looked at so many things they forgot about it or they got soured on the idea when they had initially been excited about something. You can then come back with maybe some of those things they previously looked at in this related products exit intent form, because you know they looked at some of these pages that... It might not just be like, \"You don\'t know what you don\'t know.\" It\'s that reminder of like, \"Hey remember this cool thing over here that you thought was interesting? Let\'s take one last look of that before you go.\" 04:15 AS: Sometimes it\'s they\'re impulse buyers, they\'re the cash register. You just needed that little reminder that this thing existed for you to grab on the go. And you\'re not gonna lose customers that way. And like you said, whatever it is with these forms, it\'s just another way for you to ensure that you can grab that email address before they go. They might have not already been a subscriber and it\'s just one other way to grow that list when you got people come to your site and showing some interest in what you\'re doing. It\'s that hail Mary you throw to try and get them coming back later on when they were otherwise gonna leave your website. 04:49 AS: Alright, thanks everyone for listening, we\'ll catch you on the next one with our last episode focused on the Exit intent pop-up forms. Bye.


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Growing a List: Shopping Cart

Growing a List: Shopping Cart

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 20, 2018

We continue talking about the different types of exit-intent pop-up forms by discussing the shopping cart. If someone places an item in your eCommerce shopping cart but doesn\'t make a purchase, you can catch them on the way out with a popup signup form. Then you can follow-up afterward to convince them to complete their purchase. 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back everybody, we\'re continuing our conversation about growing a list with the focus on different types of exit intent pop-up forms for these groups. And I keep saying, \"uh\" in the middle of that phrase and I don\'t know why, but if you\'re playing a drinking game with every time I say, \"uh.\" Daniel knows all too well that usually, my phrase is, \"you know.\" But my \"uhs\" are giving \"you know\" a run for its money in these episodes. So we\'re recording on a Friday and not playing a drinking game, but if we were I would probably be Ubering home. 00:56 Daniel Miller: I think that would be a good way to... That should be a good addition to this podcast, all of our podcasts to be honest. You say like whatever mine is and we should just have a beer, if it\'s recorded on Friday, of course. Anyway, let\'s get back to the subject, what do we have today? 01:10 AS: We\'re talking about shopping cart exit intent pop-up sign-up forms. And I did it again, which is insane. 01:17 DM: So how is that different from email abandonment? 01:21 AS: Yeah, sure. And I\'m glad you said that, because people will often hear shopping cart abandonment and be like, \"Oh, I know those email campaigns that I get if I leave something in my cart.\" Amazon\'s the king of it, but most other e-commerce platforms, you leave something in the shopping cart, they\'re kinda always gonna come in with that email reminder of, \"You forgot something. Did you forget we\'re here? Maybe here\'s a discount to help you make that purchase.\" Or some customer testimonials that are really gonna help seal the deal and get you back into that inbox. But all that relies on them opening an email, clicking on it, going back to the website and completing the purchase. And that\'s a lot of extra steps that you\'re trusting someone\'s gonna take. 02:01 AS: And you absolutely should be doing that strategy. But there\'s something you should be doing, which is this strategy before it even gets to that. Because this is gonna pop up before they even leave the cart in the first place. So it\'s gonna cut out the middle man of all those other steps and really help you make that sale right off the bat if you can. Because they\'re like, \"Oh, I don\'t know. I gotta wait \'til my next paycheck. Or I\'m not sure if I really need this, I\'ll leave it there for a day and if I still want it tomorrow.\" But as they\'re going to click away, if you can catch them with, \"Hey, here\'s a discount.\" Or, \"Here\'s what you want.\" Or they might not even be a subscriber in the first place, so you couldn\'t even send them those abandon cart emails, because you don\'t even have their email address, because this is the first time they\'ve come to your website, they never signed up. So at least then you get the sign-up form to do those follow-up emails. 02:53 DM: Yeah, and there\'s certain things, like depending on what you\'re selling, this may change. And the idea for these podcasts, of course, there is no right answer to anything, really. It\'s all gonna be based on what your business is and so forth. So here\'s an example for you. Let\'s say that the thing that you\'re selling is a large ticket item, and somebody is right there about to buy it, but they\'re not quite sure. They\'re browsing through multiple products, and then they\'re about to leave. That may be a perfect time to be like, \"Hey, we understand that this is a big ticket item for you. Here\'s a PDF or a video or case studies.\" Whatever that is that help. Again, we\'re going to the same thing. What is it that your subscriber needs to make that decision to buy? Whatever that is, that\'s what your pop-up form should really try to focus on. 03:34 AS: Yeah, give them value proposition and that social proof. Everyone trusts someone else more than they\'re gonna trust your business, almost always. So if you can give them, \"Hey, here\'s a few happy customers, hear why they use this product or how they benefited from these services.\" Or whatever that is, that they\'re like, \"Oh man, I don\'t need to sleep on this, like there it is.\" Or, I mean, you can try something even a little more slyer, \"This is a limited quality, make sure you purchase now or you might have to wait till the next batch is ready.\" And that sense of urgency also goes a long way. But yeah, it\'s anything you can do that\'s gonna ease any of the friction that\'s present from them not making that purchase. On the blog, tons of times, in tons of our other content we keep singing the praises of the conversion heuristic. But that\'s what all of these touch points is, is what\'s gonna erase the most amount of friction to help someone make a conversion. 04:29 DM: Yeah. And again, going back to your business specifically, offering a discount at the cart may not be the best idea for you. So, always remember, these are just ideas that we\'re giving out. What is the equivalent to that for your business? The pop-up of a discount may not make sense right then and there, but what could be something different, right? The other day I was searching for shoes online, and I was looking at a certain website, and I didn\'t fill out anything. I didn\'t do anything and then I left. And then when I went to go buy shoes again, when I went to actually shop again, I did the same Google search. I didn\'t go back to that website. I did the same Google search and I ended up going to a different store. So, the reason why I\'m putting this out is that is a real-life example of how somebody could potentially shop. And that shows the importance of that pop-up, at least to try to get an email or to try to get something so you can try to get them back to your store. It\'s important to understand what\'s the holdup? Is it the price? Is it timing? What could that possibly be? And again, that\'s what you\'re gonna wanna try to show in your pop-up. 05:35 AS: Yeah, definitely. And one thing I\'ll say, it doesn\'t have to be a discount. If something says like, \"Hey, don\'t go.\" Or, \"You still need convincing? Sign up and we\'ll tell you a little bit more about this.\" So then you\'re sending follow-ups, not just trying to make them feel like you\'re trying to sell to them, which no one really likes that feeling, but instead, they\'re signing up and you\'re gonna send those testimonials, or, \"Here\'s how people are using these products.\" Or services or whatever. \"Here\'s related products that may go with this.\" Paint that picture for them and like what their life will look like when they do have it. So then they do come back and make that conversion, and you didn\'t even have to offer the discount or whatever it was, because you did the sale but you did it in a more organic way on their own timing that they felt comfortable with, and then you got a happy customer without them feeling pressured. 06:28 DM: Yeah. 06:28 AS: Alright, thanks everyone for listening. We\'ll catch you next time.


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Growing a List: Freebies, Discounts & Special Offers

Growing a List: Freebies, Discounts & Special Offers

Clueless Email Marketer?! • August 17, 2018

  Last episode we talked about the exit-intent signup form. There are a few different approaches you can take with that strategy. This episode discusses using them to offer freebies, discounts and special offers: 00:22 Andy Shore: Welcome back, everybody, we\'re gonna continue our ongoing conversation that\'s been kicking off this whole podcast about talking about growing your list and the different ways to do that. This group of episodes right now is really focusing on exit intent pop-up forms, and the first one is really the most common one you\'ll encounter, it\'s probably what you\'ll see more often than not if you are seeing an exit intent form, and that\'s one that\'s promoting freebies, discounts, special offers. 00:51 Daniel Miller: Exactly. And the benefit of this is, as we\'ve been talking in the last couple of episodes, is this is your last line of defense. If somebody\'s about to leave, you have that chance to show a pop-up to try to engage with \'em one last time. Maybe they missed that piece of information on your site, maybe they were looking for something else, and in that pop-up form that\'s exactly what you provide. Freebies, discounts, or PDFs, downloads, all of that you can offer, as well as videos. You can give them access maybe to a specific link that has a video or an audio file, something that they can download. Really, the possibilities are endless onto what you can provide with the pop-up form. The benefit is it\'s an exchange of their email address. 01:36 AS: Yeah, so really what you wanna do is they\'re on their way out the door, I\'m gonna spare you guys a Marlon Brando impression, because I can\'t do impressions, [chuckle] but you wanna make \'em an offer you can\'t refuse because they\'re already leaving, you gotta get something to turn \'em around and keep \'em right there. So it has to be something good that they\'re gonna want, you can\'t just be like, \"Hey, sign up and hear more from us.\" They\'re already leaving, they felt like they had heard enough, so it\'s gotta be something, those previews, those discounts, that\'s gonna have value. And Daniel mentioned a PDF, and it\'s just like if you have a one-sheet that\'s really good, valuable information that\'s... Maybe it\'s a checklist for doing something, or a worksheet for solving a problem, or whatever that is, that if you can give \'em that free thing, that\'s a lead magnet. And it\'s gonna keep them coming back, and it\'s gonna make them remember your brand because you\'re gonna put your logo on it, and every time they go to use that and every time they share it with other friends and other businesses \'cause they\'re finding it immensely helpful, it\'s gonna continue doing that marketing for you, and it\'s all from that last-ditch effort you took with the exit intent pop-up form. 02:46 DM: Yeah. And one thing that I can say is try to be funny with it, but also know your place, in the sense of make sure that whatever the pop-up form is also matches your brand, your brand voice, tone, and so forth. And one thing that I\'ve been seeing a lot lately... I\'m sure it works because it hits you in the feels, but be careful when you use certain wording like \"Sign up or you hate us,\" things like that where it\'s very extreme. I don\'t know, it plays with the emotion, and I can see it getting a lot of sign-ups, but also remind yourself this: Do you just want a lot of sign-ups, or do you want qualified sign-ups that are potentially gonna buy? And really try to have your pop-up form really do the action that you\'re looking for, not just get sign-ups. Whether it\'s buy or just subscribe, whatever that is, make sure it\'s pushing one step further to that rather than just getting tons of sign-ups because, like we\'ve said in previous episodes as well, tons of sign-ups may skew your numbers later on. You may actually have a higher engagement rate than you think, you just got a bunch of junk sign-ups that really didn\'t care to sign up anyway, and they just haven\'t gone through the effort of unsubscribing yet. So keep that in mind. 04:00 AS: Yeah, that\'s a good point. It\'s like when you\'re running contests on social media, you offer a really good prize, sign up and win an Apple Watch. 04:06 DM: Everybody\'s gonna... 04:07 AS: Everyone\'s gonna sign up, but it\'s just \'cause they wanted an Apple Watch, not \'cause they ever wanted to hear anything from you. So stay on brand with what that is that you\'re offering because that\'s the way you\'re gonna attract the right type of leads. And like Daniel said, maybe you wanna use humor or maybe you don\'t if that\'s true to your brand. In the book we\'re gonna release, there\'s an example for this kind that\'s got the sad puppy dog looking back up at you, but it\'s not just in a pathetic way. It\'s pretty funny, it\'s just like, \"Oh, where are you going?\" Daniel and I are both dog owners, we know that look when you put your shoes on, or about to head out the door, that you get those sad puppy dog eyes about leaving. So play around with the messages, stay on brand, but stay true to you, and do what\'s gonna get them on your list, but the right people on your list, and make sure you\'re not losing \'em without that last-ditch effort. 05:00 DM: Exactly. And I\'m sorry, but just to clarify, the one thing that that puppy thing does is it shows your brand personality, too. And I think that\'s what people are looking for now \'cause most anything, there are a ton of competitors out there. Unless you have a very unique business, you probably have a competitor. And when it comes down to that, I need to decide why am I gonna choose you versus someone else? If your pop-up talks to me the way that I see, huh, you made me laugh, you made me feel something, I\'m gonna wanna sign up. But like we were saying, don\'t try to just do it just to get sign-ups, because then you\'ll just blur your actual subscriber list. 05:35 AS: Yeah, there\'s so much automation out there today that whenever you can give those human touches to really just humanize your brand and make \'em feel like there\'s people behind it rather than algorithms, it\'s gonna help you go the extra mile with that. So thanks everyone for listening. We\'ll continue talking about different types of exit intent pop-up forms next time. Thanks for listening.


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