Tags: copywriting

Copywriting Your Email Marketing Pop-ups

Copywriting Your Email Marketing Pop-ups

Beyond • June 25, 2015

Having sat with my developer a week ago, trying to drum up ideas for copywriting our email marketing pop-ups for my personal blog, I discovered one small crippling fact. Even though I’m a professional writer, email marketing and marketing manager, I was at a bit of a loss on how to best copy write our email subscription pop-up. And then I thought, if this is what I’m experiencing, then how many of you out there are facing the same problem? As a marketing manager, I know that email subscription pop-ups are a rare beast to write for, namely due to three reasons: You’re writing a very punctuated set of value-based copy that is purely conversion driven. You’re writing it like it’s a headline, but it’s not a headline. Copywriting your email marketing pop-up means you need to be able to pin down the number one call to action and reason for conversion in about 1 line. The other lines might be action oriented or identifying value, but verbiage encouraging others to join comes down to one line. Undoubtedly, this is hard. Very hard. It’s also a great exercise that helped me further developed laser like focus on why a website exists – and it’ll do the same for you. Yet, you’re probably not a professional writer and it might help you to see what other email marketing pop-up subscriptions look like. Some websites take an introductory approach since their content is so unique. Take this template for an example which offers a value sign-up options that offers a free webinar: New to (state your service industry)? Join our 30-minute webinar to learn how to (state service) on (state date and time) If you’re website is offering valuable information, you can also trigger an email-pop up that might be slightly unscrupulous to some, but it requests a sign up in order to continue browsing through the site. Of course, a user could just exit the opt-in button, but most won’t. That copy would read like this: Please Register or Sign-in to Continue. Enter your email address to gain unlimited access to our website. You’ll also receive other exclusive benefits by joining (state your name here) Enter your email address to create a FREE ACCOUNT Another option is to get straight to the value and offer a direct download via an email subscription pop-up. Rather than baiting users with a free download once they sign up and confirm their email (two steps to take for a future reward), you can offer an immediate down load (and immediate gratification). Here’s what that might look like: Download Your Free (Item) Resource: Get (state what it is they’re receiving in one brief line) Bullet point 1, identifying value received from free downloadable item Bullet point 2, also no more than 3-5 words Bullet point 3, no more than 3-5 words Where should we send your (item) [Create fields for name and email address] [include colored call-to-action button for “enter,” creatively labelled “download (item)”] Once you’ve mastered the copy for your email marketing pop-up, switch over the analytics to see which versions prove to be the most successful. You should have multiple versions of email pop ups throughout your site, timed with intelligence to capture the highest rate of subscribers.


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6 Tips for Writing Your Own Copy in 2015

6 Tips for Writing Your Own Copy in 2015

Beyond • January 7, 2015

It’s easy to write content for your blog or website, but that doesn’t mean that it’s easy to do it well. Sure, anyone can sit down and pound out a blog post on how to unclog a drain or the dos and don’ts of making pastry dough, but the ability to simply do something is never any guarantee of quality. The unfortunate reality of a world focused on disciplines like engineering, technology, and medicine, is that developing writing skills seem to have taken a backseat to “more employable” and “more lucrative” pursuits (not that we have anything against engineers, tech innovators, or doctors). The good news is that there is, and always will be, a need for clear, clever, and engaging writers. You don’t have to have a degree in English to be a good writer (though it certainly does help), so we’ve put together a few tips to get you started writing your own copy. Too Much Branding No one wants to read a blog that only publishes overtly promotional posts. Describing what your new product can do is great, but it can be boring and probably won’t bring in visitors that aren’t already looking for your product. Follow the 80/20 rule – 80% of your content should be unbranded but related to your product offering, while the remaining 20% can be promotional. The trick is to figure out what your target audience is talking about and what they want to read, and then creating content that is actually useful. If you sell hardwood floors, don’t write a post about how great your floors are – try writing a post about how to choose the right wood color for your décor. Remember Your Audience Always keep your audience in mind when writing copy. Use keyword research and social monitoring to find out what they’re talking about and the language they’re using, then join the conversation. Don’t write an article for a homeowner looking to choose their own floors if your target audience is interior designers. Stay On Topic One of the first things any English major will learn is to be concise. High school teachers seem to love flowery, extravagant language, but most people prefer it if you get straight to the point. Make your point clearly – it leaves less room for interpretation and argument, and clearly sends the message you want to send. Choose one topic for each webpage or blog post. If you’re writing an article on how to choose the right floor color, don’t digress and talk about how to choose matching draperies. Save that topic for another post – that way, you end up with more content, and it’s usually better quality. Keyword Optimization Your copy should be optimized for your target keywords, but it shouldn’t be overly repetitive. Don’t force your keywords into your copy – let them flow naturally and your audience will thank you for it. No Personality The hardest part about writing your own copy, especially blog copy, is developing a personality. I find the best way to do this is to just start writing. Write how you would talk, get a first draft done, and then as you edit and proofread you can clean up the language. If you have a funny comment to make, make it! Always keep your writing politically correct. If you’re not sure whether someone will be offended by a particular opinion or joke, it’s best not to express it. The Biggest Mistake… The worst mistake a novice copywriter can make is to not proofread and edit their writing. There will always be a typo, inappropriate word, run-on sentence, or improper comma to fix, so always proofread your work. Edit it two or three times, and try reading it out loud before you publish it. That way, you can tell if your sentences flow together, if your point actually makes sense, and catch any wayward typos or grammar errors in the process. If you’re not confident with your writing skills, hire a professional copywriter. High-quality copywriting signals a high-quality product or service offering. Professional copywriters can help you craft creative copy that will attract new audiences and keep your current readers engaged and ready for more.


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