Tags: Design

How To Design Your Email Marketing Campaign

How To Design Your Email Marketing Campaign

Practical Marketer • April 12, 2018

Email marketing is amazing. In 2017, 54% of the entire planet had an email address. That means there are more people with an email address than there are people who have a Facebook account. And while Facebook is a good way of reaching your audience and increasing your sales, savvy digital marketers use it as a means of capturing people\'s email addresses. They know that email marketing is more effective than social media, with 44% of users checking their email for a deal from a company they know, whereas only 4% will go to Facebook. If someone is on your email list, it’s because they chose to be there. This means all you have to do is keep them there, and to sell them your stuff. How are you going to do that? With a perfectly designed email marketing campaign that contains all the right components, from top-notch copy to engaging visuals. First, you need to... Nail The Subject Line Almost 50% of your subscribers will open an email because the subject line appealed to them. Buzzfeed knows how important the subject line is when it comes to making an email marketing campaign. Their subject lines are always brilliant, and their former newsletter editor, Dan Oshinksy gives great advice when he says that you need to “Make your subject line clear. Nobody should open an email and not know what they’re about to read.” Email marketers struggle with the subject line because they get around 40-50 characters to make an impression on the reader. That isn’t much, and it means you need to do a few things in a limited space:   Tell people what they’re going to get   Be personal - include their name   Tease - arouse curiosity   Outline a benefit they’ll receive if they open this email   Avoid spam words, such as “free” or “cash”   Create a sense of urgency Do you need to be a magician to make this work? Not at all. Here is an example of expertly crafted subject lines: Send Out Awesome Copy No one wants to read boring emails. They want to be informed or at least entertained. Don’t focus on selling something in every email you send during your campaign. In fact, it’s hard to sell to strangers on the Internet unless you’ve first built a strong rapport with them so that they now trust you. Build rapport by sending out emails that are rich in value and tips and tricks. Make a human connection with your readers by relating a personal story of yours. Get to know them with questions. Segment Your Email List Segmentation works. Segmented email lists return almost 60% more clicks and boost open rates by 14.64%. If you don’t segment your email list, you’re essentially sending out the same email to all your customers, who have different tastes, interests and priorities. Over time, some subscribers will feel as though they’re getting no value from your emails and will either stop opening them or unsubscribe. Perhaps the easiest way to segment your list is with a survey or quiz. Keep in mind that your list will need incentivizing - after all, not all of your subscribers will take the time to fill out a survey or list out of the goodness of their own heart. A survey gives you a massive insight into what your customers want, but it also lets you segment your list according to different wants and needs. Then, you can design your email marketing campaign so that you’re sending better-targeted emails out to the right cluster of customers. WordPress has a Quiz and Survey Master plugin that you may find useful. Another way to segment your list is according to past purchases. If a customer bought X product, make sure you retarget them with a similar product - as opposed to a random one that has zero interest to them. This tailors the shopping experience to each and makes it more personal - which is exactly what customers want. Use Color This is one trick that some email marketers miss, but it’s also not important that all marketers use color in their email. It all depends on what your niche is. For example, an organic food newsletter would benefit from some green text that gives the email a vibrancy and freshness. This makes a better connection with the target audience. Color can be a hugely important aspect of your email newsletter, and it can help you to stand out and make an emotional connection with your subscribers. Think about Christmas for a moment. What colors would a festive email need to contain to make it stand out and catch your eye? Red and green would work. Then there is, of course, the psychology behind color and most consumers have said that color influences their decision-making more than anything else. What colors you use depends what your intentions are: Red:   Attracts attention   Creates a sense of urgency (danger) that they might miss out Yellow:   Makes us feel good (sunshine, warmth, happiness)   Use it to promote vacations and deals Orange:   Energetic (sun-kissed, oranges)   Promote food produce Green:   Fruit and veg campaigns Blue:   Promotes a feeling of trust   Water products and cleanliness Black:   Professional   Slick   Elegant Create A Killer CTA Emails with a single call-to-action increases clicks 371% and sales 1617%. They are an essential part of your email. The CTA is the part where you tell your subscribers exactly what it is you want them to do. Want them to buy your product? Tell them with your CTA. Want them to take your quiz? Ask them with your CTA. Make it a button so that it looks clickable, too. In text-heavy emails, visual elements stand out. Rather than placing a hyperlink in the body of text and hoping you receive clicks, create a CTA that is clickable and easy to find. You can use sites like Design Wizard to create a button without the need of a graphic designer. Keep the CTA visually simple but also keep the text simple. Don’t give people too much to do. Give them just one choice: Use a Premade Template Visuals are well worth using. We’re living in an increasingly visual world and if you haven’t yet started to focus on the visual content of your emails, now might be the time to start. In 2017, over 35% of visual marketers said visual marketing is now more important than any other content. A year earlier in 2016, over half of all B2B marketers were prioritizing visual content assets. When you use a pre-made template, it’s a lot easier to implement visuals in your email marketing campaigns. Pre-made templates are especially popular with beginners who have never used visuals in their emails before. They provide a pretty good foundation, though I’d suggest that you tweak any template you use so that your voice comes through clearly. There are tools available which provide you with ready-made email marketing templates that cost you no time at all. For you, there’s no designing involved. All you need to do is pick a template and tweak it so that - as mentioned - your voice and a brand image comes through. Templates are made up of content blocks which you can easily delete or replicate or shift around. Use Images There’s no need to go overboard with images. Just one picture can tell a thousand words. The great thing about images in emails is that you don’t need to waste time and money taking photos yourself. Instead, you can download a stock photograph from an online site. Pik Wizard, for example, offers lots of free images. In fact, there are a handful of sites that offer free stock photos. It depends what your message and brand are, but you don’t always have to aim for high-quality images. A lot of email marketers use memes that are not top-notch photos, but which are humorous and engaging. And sometimes that’s all that matters. Conclusion These are some tips on how to design your email marketing campaign in 2018. Don’t expect instant results, of course. Fine tune your design efforts, be prepared to make changes until the conversions and sales start rolling in. Let us know what you think in the comments below.


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Inside Look: Editor Restyle & Organizational Update

Inside Look: Editor Restyle & Organizational Update

Product & Design • March 22, 2017

Our company has found itself in a new season of change, and our different product teams have been growing and finding their strides. We\'ve made mistakes and have faced a bunch of challenges, but we’re learning to make continuous steps of improvement. So, thanks for joining our team’s journey. Here’s a little peek into what went into our release of the restyle and organizational update to the Drag & Drop Editor. Why did we take this on? Our Editor Product Team is comprised of two designers, a front-end developer, a back-end developer and our key stakeholder CEO. We focus on the three email editors: Drag & Drop, Plain Text and Code Editor. When we were in talks of what to take on next, we identified a reoccurring problematic issue that needed solving: inconsistent UI across our newest tools. Over the past few years, Benchmark has released some new builder tools: three email editors, two signup form builders, email engagement automation and most recently Automation Pro (Beta). One weakness was that each tool had different style variations that resulted from a number of possibilities such as multiple designers, multiple developers, lack of style guide, poor handoffs, problematic legacy code and so on. Some variations were visually obvious and some were code specific. With so many inconsistencies, it was creating a nightmare for our product teams to do any feature updates. Not to mention, it hurts our users’ experience and creates confusion as to what are expected behaviors and visual cues. How does a user learn to trust your app if the action outcome is a guessing game? We needed to organize ourselves and move toward product consistency so that our users could spend less time thinking about how to use our tool and more time focusing on their task at hand. Because of this, our team identified two goals: Clean up our design styles and code Create a more seamless user experience across our updated tools There were multiple opportunity areas, but for this release, we decided to limit it to style and organizational UI updates in the top navigation, active block panels and text editing toolbar. Each area presented its own challenges, so here are some of those thoughts. Simplify navigation within the editor The first opportunity sat with the main navigation in our editor. This was represented by four icons that divided each edit area. The fourth icon (a pencil) indicated when a block was selected but didn\'t actually contain options in its panel when a block was not being edited. It ate up valuable space and was more confusing than helpful to our users, so we removed it. We also replaced the icons with text to improve clarity across all languages. Icons took less room, but we thought it important to use clear labeling here. Dedicating ourselves to nine languages isn\'t easy. It means that all our decisions come with additional challenges and we design with worst case scenarios in mind. One challenge is character count. Most of the time our English text uses fewer characters than some languages such as German and Portuguese. In such a limited area, what happens when it gets too long? Does it push to two lines? Truncate? Expand the area? In this case, we chose to solve the issue through text size and insert fallback behaviors. This is a smaller scenario, but at other times it becomes a larger challenge when there are more factors at play. Text editing toolbar Since this is one of the components that people use the most, we realized that updating and sectioning our icons could go a long way to enhance the user experience. We also changed the behavior of the bar to be more adaptable on multiple screen sizes and devices. The full bar is shown until a user changes their browser size. At this time, each option collapses into a menu that can be accessed by clicking \"More.\" The old design invaded our user’s workspace by pushing their work down, whereas the updated design didn\'t. Active block panels This is the area we focused our efforts on. When we applied UI elements from our newest signup form builders and created any missing ones, it helped with style consistency and gave the panels more breathing room. Beneath the surface, the code was combed through, cleaned up and structured to be more modular and run faster (thanks to our front-end developer!). The second problem was organization and consistency amongst the blocks themselves. If you placed all the block options side by side, the organization was different. Our users were readjusting to each individual block, so we standardized organization across all of them. Our biggest change addressed issues with the amount of options shown at a given time and had impacts on user workflow. Some blocks were getting really bloated and weren’t scalable for the future. So for those blocks, we separated their options into two tabs based on function and then usage level within the tab. The first tab contained options relating to the overall block and the second tab dealt with options relating to the elements within that block. So, what’s next? A lot actually! Our team has been taking baby steps to gain deeper user insights by moving toward the “Jobs-to-be-done” methodology. If you haven’t yet, I highly recommend checking out Intercom\'s ebook :) They nicely describe it like this: People buy products and services to get a \'job\' done. The key to success is understanding the real job customers are using your product for. This year is shaping up to be full of new and exciting releases. Hopefully, we’ll be chatting about them along the way! Until we meet again ...


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