Tags: frequency

The Double Edged Sword of Increasing Email Frequency

The Double Edged Sword of Increasing Email Frequency

Beyond • May 7, 2013

In the search for greater ROI from email marketing campaigns, brands often default to simply increasing the frequency of their email sends. Although this approach increases monthly gross revenue, there are additional charges that can wipe out any gains. 3 X Per Week Produces 40% More Revenue Per Month, But 40% Less Per Email There have been various studies to prove that increasing email sending frequency is a double edged sword. When mailings are increased from weekly to three times a week, the increased campaign produces approximately 40% more revenue per month. However, the average revenue produced per email sent drops by 40%... and there’s more bad news. The higher frequency’s unsubscribe rate is 140% greater than that of the lower frequency one. Therefore, if you’re averaging a 1% unsubscribe on a weekly frequency, you can look forward to a 2.4% unsubscribe rate at the higher frequency. The spam complaint rate per emailing increases by 600%, and over a full month, the increase is 1,300%. Therefore you can expect your overall spam complaints per month to vary from 0.05% at the low frequency to an uncomfortable 0.65% at the high frequency. High Frequency Email Sends Can Cost You More Than 1/3 of Your List Per Year Without even factoring in the increase in the hard bounce rate, the unsubscribes plus the spam complaints alone will cost you 3.05% of your list every month, or 36.6% a year. That’s more than a third of your subscribers gone, and with a bad taste in their mouths as well. In less than three years, there might not be a single original name left from your list today! Plugging in some financial factors brings the abstract percentages into a better perspective. Let’s assume that your weekly emailing is producing $2 million in revenue a year from a list of 500,000 prospects. Jumping to a thrice weekly format will increase that to $2.8 million. That seems great until you consider that you’ll be losing 183,000 of those customers per year, and if you calculate an average cost of $12 for replacing each of those losses with prospects of roughly equal value, keeping your list numbers consistent will cost nearly $2.2 million. There are also considerable additional costs to creating, testing and sending the millions of extra emails. When Seeking to Increase Your Strategy’s Effectiveness, Ask Yourself These Questions Of course very few email marketers engage in campaigns of this frequency, but the numbers do show that simply ramping up the frequency of your emails is not the wisest strategy. Therefore you should consider the other aspects of your email strategy to maximize its effectiveness by asking yourself these important basic questions: Do you have an email messaging strategy and is it effective? Can the success metrics of your brand be improved? What is your customer acquisition vs. loss rate? What is your customer acquisition cost? Are your customers more or less responsive to you than they were last year at this time? Are your customers spending more or less with you than they were last year at this time? Is your product or service facing competition of a type that did not exist a year ago? And most importantly… Is your product or service still interesting, attractive, competitive, well-priced, up-to-date and relevant? There Are Many Valid Options Other Than Just Ramping Up The Frequency This analysis will help you determine the basic current status of your overall email campaigns and branding efforts so that you can determine if your success (or lack thereof) can be attributed to your email marketing policies. There are many aspects to consider when you are analyzing your campaign strategies, and simply cranking up the frequency of your emails is not necessarily the best option.


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How to Reduce Spam Complaints?

How to Reduce Spam Complaints?

Beyond • June 16, 2009

One of the keys to success in e-mail marketing is to reduce the number of spam complaints that you receive. Spam complaints can hurt your standing with your ISP or hosting provider, and even prevent your messages from being delivered to millions of users of popular web e-mail providers such as Gmail, Hotmail, and Yahoo mail. In spite of these potentially very significant consequences, many businesses that rely on e-mail marketing as a major part of their advertising efforts fail to understand the steps that you can take to prevent spam complaints from being submitted. The following tips will help you reduce your spam complaints: Confirmed opt-in: The best way to ensure that your subscribers want to receive mailings from you is by using a confirmed opt-in process. It requires your subscribers to confirm their subscription by replying to an e-mail before they can be added to your e-mail list. Your list only: It is no longer acceptable to purchase e-mail lists or use third-party lists. You should remove any e-mail addresses obtained from third party sources. Practice good list hygiene: Don’t get in love with your list. The quantity of email addresses in your list means little; it is the quality that counts. As a general rule, the older your list (or addresses in your list) the greater the chance that they may not be any longer interested in receiving mails from you. That said, there are no specific rules as all businesses are different. Some businesses will know that some of their best customers are their oldest customers, so the culling of all e-mail addresses obtained before a specific date may not be suitable for those businesses. Include the Unsubscribe Link: The first and most important step you can take is to include an unsubscribe link in every message. Beyond this, the unsubscribe link should be two things: obvious and painless. Customers who want your emails will ignore the link, and those who don\'t will find it easy to unsubscribe from your list, rather than hastily clicking the email as spam. Evaluate your Subject Line: Ensure that - especially when starting out - your company name is included in the subject line. You may be thinking that is not necessary, since your company name will more than likely show in the \"from\" field, however, this helps to convey professionalism. Be sure that the message in your subject line is actually conveyed in the email. No one likes to be duped, and doing so raises the chances of your e-mail being marked as spam. Familiar layout: Using a consistent e-mail template with the same colors, fonts and layout will help your subscribers to recognize your e-mail campaigns. Over time your subscribers will recognize your layout and with that familiarity they will be reminded that they have subscribed to your list. Familiar and consistent company name: Confusion and complaints can originate from subscribers being unfamiliar with your company or brand name. Consistent from address: Using a consistent ‘from’ e-mail address serves two purposes. First, using the same ‘from’ address over time is another way to ensure that your subscribers recognise your e-mails. It is best to use a from e-mail address that includes your brand or the company name that they subscribed to. Second, if different ‘from’ addresses are used it increases the chances that the subscriber’s local e-mail filter programs (spam filters) will block your e-mails. It is a good idea to ask your subscribers to add your e-mail address to their address book to ensure that your messages will get past any local filters. Frequency: A common complaint trigger is businesses sending too many e-mails to the same group of people. While a subscriber may like your products and your business, there becomes a point when your mailings become annoying when sent too often, particularly if you are sending essentially the same message over and over again. The frequency of mail-outs will depend on your business and the type of information you provide to your subscribers. By outlining the anticipated frequency in your sign-up subscription terms, your subscribers will know how often to expect your mailings. Few other tips: - do not write long email copy - go for “short and crisp”, then point to your website for more information; - don’t repeat your website URL over and over again — you are more likely to get more complaints than more sales; once or twice is usually enough; - run a spam-check on your messages before you send them out and fix any problems that it detects.


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Email Marketing Frequency: Sending on a Regular Basis

Email Marketing Frequency: Sending on a Regular Basis

Beyond • June 11, 2009

Most email marketing experts warn you against sending too frequently or even too infrequently. But few address the basic concept of consistency in your email marketing campaigns. In other words,  not sending on a regular basis is the same as sending too frequently or infrequently. Imagine email marketing to be like a new relationship. If you see the other person on a regular basis, you get some steam going. You build trust. Things feel more natural and normal. But if you show up twice in one week, but not for the next two months, things are going to be weird. And it\'s exactly the same with your email marketing recipients. So, how do you do it? How do you create a plan that makes certain you send your emails on a regular basis? We\'ve got some tips for you, so keep reading: 1. Create an editorial calendar Editorial calendars are what magazine editors and writers use to keep track of what they\'re doing months or weeks ahead. As an email marketer, you should create the same kind of calendar.  Mark the days that you plan on sending your emails. Now, try to figure out what you\'ll focus on during those days. For instance, suppose you run a stationary shop. You don\'t know for certain what you\'ll be doing six months from now, but you can guess that you\'ll probably be gearing up for wedding season, Easter, and even college graduation. Ballpark it and mark your calendar and you\'ll always know how much time you\'ll need to get your specific emails together. 2. Appoint a newsletter guardian Running a business takes lots of time, which is why many business owners and managers tend to shuffle their company email and newsletter campaigns to whoever seems to have a light moment. But by not giving your email or newsletter to the same person every time, you\'re not only putting out a different product each time, but you\'re increasing your chances that your email will be sent out irregularly. To combat this scenario, make your email the job of only one responsible person. Let that person shepherd it from start to finish. Not only will this person make sure it goes out on time, but they\'ll be there to make sure everyone turns in what they need (artwork, shipping schedules, product schematics) long before the email campaign is finally sent. 3. Bank Evergreen copy Start putting together copy for your newsletter that can be used at any time. This copy might include  tips on how to use a product, or even a how-to list that helps recipients save time and money. The key to this copy is to have it ready to drop in when you\'re short on time and need to fill space in your email campaign or company newsletter. So, how do you create this copy? Every day, create a task for yourself. Come up with one tip on how to save money, one “do you know?” factlet about your realm of business, or even just one way customers can use your products or services that they might not have known about previously. Add these things up and in a month, you should have at least three or four articles or tip sheets you can use in a pinch. 4. Create custom email or newsletter departments Break your newsletter or email down into sections. What do you write about each time? New features? General industry news? Tips? Once you have a good idea of what you\'ve been doing every time, you can adjust your template accordingly so that all you need to do is drop in the appropriate section-focused text or images every single time. The key to this exercise is not to reinvent the wheel, but rather come up with a system that helps you easily stick with a schedule. As an email marketer, you want a routine that you can stick to all the time, even during the busiest parts of the year. By putting these measures into place, you\'ll know well ahead of time how much time you\'ll need to dedicate to every single newsletter, and exactly what\'s needed both text and art-wise to keep your campaigns on schedule.


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