Tags: Open Rates

How Key Points of Contact, Good Data Design Can Help with Click & Open Rates

How Key Points of Contact, Good Data Design Can Help with Click & Open Rates

Beyond • January 20, 2017

At the enterprise level, the average email marketing campaign can take anywhere from 2 to 6 hours, depending on the scale of the email. You invest time in designing and crafting content for the email, only to shoot it out into cyberspace with the hope of a blind arrow. You’re trusting people are reading. If we’re being honest, most of us are really just hoping someone reads it. That by definition is a bad email marketing practice. It would be like renting a boat to go fishing, picking the best spot, getting the best bait and putting in all that work only to walk away from the fishing line as soon as you’ve cast it into the water. Doing all that work not to see through the final step is not what a lean agency does. A lean agency sticks around to see how much fish took the bait. In your case, each email marketing campaign you send out is like a finishing line cast into the water. Part of the complete email marketing cycle is to go around to your email marketing reports and see what your click and open rates look like. Understanding click and open rates – from the entire email down to the links within the email – is something that’s integral to your success. Doing this ritually after every campaign means you’re understanding your data. With a true sense of what your data looks like, you’re able to adapt your future campaigns so that your email marketing efforts are an investment in your brand messaging that nurtures sales or audience loyalty. Data Diagnosis that Looks at Key Points of Contact Understanding data was key for Gen Next, an exclusive members-only group that helps moves entrepreneurs from being successful to being impactful by getting them involved in world-changing conversations. Gen Next’s audience base are comprised of powerful people with very little free time on their hands. This means that in order for them to read something, it has to be worth their time. You would think the default tone of a successful email campaign for this audience would be somewhat serious. However, that strategy wasn’t quite so effective and yielded incredibly low open rates. Their marketing team started with the first breadcrumb in any campaign: the subject line. They switched it up from stuff to interesting, creating a sense of FOMO (fear of missing out) that was the one thing that really drove their membership in the first place. Click and open rates bumped up within the first week. The ability to even question the first step in your audience’s encounter with our campaign is something that’s initiated when you look at data. Data allows us to step outside of the emotionally driven nature of marketing, and look at things with the objectivity of a scientist. At the end of the day, we’re not scientists. We don’t want to be buried in data, which is why data design matters just as much as the data itself. Why Good Data Design is Part of a Happy Ending Your email template isn’t the only thing that should be well designed. For most marketing teams, analytics is an incredible challenge. It’s time-consuming to read through and — if we’re being honest — a little difficult to comprehend. This is why choosing an email marketing provider that can deliver well-designed analytics is going to be something you’ll want to consider. Benchmark, for example, offers a clean analytics report with a simple design that lays out the information in two ways. This way you’re able to quickly scan to get a big picture and a more detailed report that doesn’t take more than a few seconds to understand. By comparison, leading email marketing providers offer more rudimentary analytics which gives you a few numbers but doesn’t give you the big picture.


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What Should I Do With My Nightmarish Open Rate?

What Should I Do With My Nightmarish Open Rate?

Practical Marketer • October 4, 2016

Perhaps you sent an email campaign recently, reviewed your reports and did a double take. No! It can’t be. That open rate can’t be right! Let me refresh the page and see if it changes. Shoot! It’s true. That open rate may be the thing of nightmares, making you shoot up in the middle of the night with a cold sweat on your brow. So, what can you do to fix it? Clean Your List Perhaps your open rate is low due to a large number of inactive subscribers filling up your list. It is important to maintain good list hygiene. Look to see who hasn’t opened your last several campaigns. You can remove them outright, or at least attempt a re-engagement campaign to see if you can bring some inactive subscribers back into the fold. Work On Your Subject Lines The subject line is your foot in the door of your subscribers’ inbox. It’s the first impression each campaign makes and the best chance at enticing them to open your email campaign. Remember, the subject line needs to show them the value in your email campaign. It’s not about you! If you’re writing subject lines that service your needs, that may be the cause of your nightmarish open rates. Make it about the subscriber and make sure your campaigns deliver on the promise of your subject lines. Adjust The From Name People don’t like feeling that they’re being marketing to. Sometimes, sending from just your brand name does just that. Try using the name of your CEO, your email marketing manager or an account manager with which your subscribers may have some familiarity. Or combine the two. For example, if you were receiving an email from me it may say “Andy from Benchmark Email.” Run An A/B Test Enough with the guessing games. A/B Testing is one of the most important things you can do with your email campaigns. It tells you how your subscribers are most likely to react to your email campaigns. You can test subject lines as well as From Names against one another to see which are most likely to get your campaigned opened. The A/B Test will send a small portion to a percentage of your list and then send the winning email to the remainder of your list.


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What’s The Expected Open Rate For My Industry?

What’s The Expected Open Rate For My Industry?

Practical Marketer • July 11, 2016

An open rate depends on a variety of things when it comes to email marketing. Not everyone will open your email, so you shouldn’t expect a 100% open rate when you send out a campaign. It’s not impossible to get 100%, but you’ll need to be somewhat psychic. So what is the expected open rate of an email campaign? Some would be surprised to see that on average, across all industries, it’s 15% - 20%. Since that is across all industries, let’s break it down by a couple industries, measured during the course of one year as learned from Smart Insights: Automobile: 24.9% Computer Software: 22.1% Food Service: 22% Insurance: 29.7% School: 27.9% We can see that the average, when broken down into different industries, is improved. Don’t worry if you aren’t getting these numbers! There are certain tools and tips that you can put to use in order to increase your open rate ... even if it’s just a little bit. Segment your list. Creating a segmented, more targeted list will improve your opens rates. In retail, you may try to track what products your subscribers are interested in and promote similar products. List Hygiene. When people hear list hygiene they think, “Deleting contacts, NO!” However, deleting contacts that don’t read or open your email is beneficial when you really look at it. You reduce the total emails you send, saving you money. You’ll also reduce the greymail and possible abuse complaints, increasing your deliverability. Preview Text. This is an advanced tool for some which allows users to control what subscribers see before even opening the email, enticing users to open the email beyond the subject line. Remember not to lie or be deceptive about that either.


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Top 10 sales email subject lines to increase open rates

Top 10 sales email subject lines to increase open rates

Practical Marketer • May 20, 2016

You invest time drafting a perfect sales email pitch, inserting the perfect links and crafting the perfect CTA (call-to-action) for your emails. Is your time well spent? All this is a waste if nobody even bothers to open your email. This is where the importance of a subject line becomes the topic of discussion. Email marketing is still among one of the best method of communication with prospects, leads and customers. In the era of the crowded email inbox, before your prospects, leads or customers reads your email ... it has to be opened first. That’s why the subject line of a sales email plays a vital role. The more people that open your emails, the increased probability for sales. Hundreds of billions of sales emails are sent every day to grab the attention of the customer. How many unread emails are there in your inbox? 200? 500? Probably 1,000 if you have subscribed to countless mailing lists. People today get many emails daily and most of them go unopened. People are flooded with more information than ever before and have less time to soak it all in. Most of the emails are simply ignored ... unless they have a rocking subject line. According to a study on email statistics, 35% of recipients open emails based on the subject lines alone and 69% of the recipients report an email as SPAM based on the subject line of the email alone. There isn’t a silver-bullet subject line for a given subject, because what works for one business might not work effectively for another. Just think about this: will you open an email that has a subject line “Open Me” or “Hi” or “URGENT” or “Register to win FREE iPhone 6S+” or something similar? All such emails directly land in your SPAM folder. A bad subject line will get 5x less customers that open and read your emails. The best sales email subject lines should be creative, igniting the interest in the customers. They should have a curiosity seeking subject that is relevant to them, all while also being informative. Looking for some interesting and provoking subject lines for your sales emails that scream out “Open Me Now?” Then here are best sales email subject lines that will boost the open rates of your emails: “Need My Help?” or “Hoping to Help” The best sales people today are the ones who can help their customers solve problems. If your email lands in the inbox with an open-ended subject line like “Tell Me What You Have Been Struggling With” or “Tell Me Everything That You Have Tried and How Can I Help You” or something like “Hoping to Help” there is an increased chance for your emails being opened. Prospects get an idea on your willingness to be of service to the customers. “[Name of the Prospect], do you have 15 minutes for a conversation?” These kind of subject lines distinguish your emails from other marketers, because you’re asking a question directly in the subject line which addresses the person with his or her name. Personalized subject lines with a question in the subject help increase open rates. “We found you through [Name of the Referral]” or “[Name of the Referral] suggested that we connect” If someone referred you to a prospect, make sure to use their name in the subject rather than saving it for the body of the email. Using the name of the referral in subject line grabs a prospect’s attention right away and also gives automatic credibility to the sender for leveraging an existing connection of the prospect. A Subject Line With A Reply “Re” Many marketers use a “Re:” or “FW” in their email subject lines with an eye towards increasing their open and conversion rates. This is a clever tactic, as it exhibits a personal relationship with the prospect that you know them. However, once a prospect open the email and gets to know that they have been tricked and have not had any prior conversations with you this kind of an email subject line will not impress them. If you have actually spoken with them before and this is a factual reply then you can try removing the subject line as a whole and just including “Re” to increase the response rate of your sales emails. Email Subject Lines That Convey An Idea The Prospect Cares About If you are a blogger, an email with a subject “Idea for increasing unique visitors to your [blog name]” may intrigue you enough to click through the email and read it. Nobody wants to miss out on a free idea and the probability that prospects will open an email is greatly increased. Listicle Subject Line With Tips Or Ideas Listicle subject lines in sales emails are an effective and simple way to attract the attention of prospects.  If you are an email marketer, a subject line with “10 Best Email Subject Lines to Increase Your Open Rates by 80%” will attract you more than a subject like “Email Subject Lines To Increase Open Rates.” Using numbers in the subject line makes a prospects aware of what they are going to read. Personalized Email Subject Lines with a Question: “Hi [Name of the Prospect], [Question the prospect is looking to solve]?” If James is a content writer, then an email with a subject line something like “Hi James, Do you know how to write compelling content that boosts traffic?” will surely motivate James to open the email as it addresses his problem. Subject lines with a question are a great way to compel people to open your emails, as prospects are promised that the email content is intended to guide them and help achieve a goal. “Don’t Open This Email” Human Psychology works just the opposite way. If someone refrains you from doing something, you always are keener on doing it. This subject line is the most simple and effective means to create curiosity among the prospects to open your emails. Email Subject Lines That Benefit the Prospect= “A [Benefit] for [Prospects_CompanyName]” If a company, “ABC Inc.,” has recently launched a blog and is looking to increase its subscriber base, then a sales email subject line like “Get your first 2000 subscribers to the ABC Inc. Blog” will invoke the self-interest in opening the email to find out what’s in store to increase the number of subscribers for the blog and help it grow. That level of personalization in the subject line is likely to catch the eyes of the prospect. Email Without A Subject Line / A Blank Subject Line Email Yes, you read it right. If you cannot think of any subject line and have been scratching your head for quite some time, then just type in your email body and hit SEND. According to a study by Sidekick, emails with an empty subject line are opened 8% more often than the emails that contain a subject line. Remember getting your sales email subject lines right or wrong can actually be the difference between your emails being opened and converting to customer or lying dead in the spam folder. The ultimate goal is to make your sales email subject line stand out. These are just some of the convincing sales email subject lines that will increase your email response rates. How you customize these subject lines based on your niche in order  to increase your open rates and click-through rates is up to you. What are your favorite sales email subject lines that have stood out for your email marketing campaigns? Chime in your thoughts in the comments below!


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5 Things to Consider when Viewing Your Open Rates

Beyond • June 7, 2011

Open rates reveal how well your emails are received and give an idea as to which periods in time evoke the most interest from your subscribers. When analyzing your open rates, it is important to remember that improving the rating does not necessarily mean getting the stats up. Improving open rates is really more about bettering your email marketing. Here are 5 things to consider when viewing your open rates. 1. One Size Fits All? There is no one size fits all open rate. Similar to how a local market can’t contend with the chain grocery store downtown in sheer sales numbers, open rates will drastically vary from business to business depending on various factors. Rather than comparing your open rates with those of another business, rationalize the figures by considering the ratings in relation to the total number of emails that were sent out. Take it a step further by measuring how well received your emails are at various times of the day to give yourself an idea of the days and times your blasts are most successful. 2. Low Open Rates Send out too many emails and people get overwhelmed or become uninterested. Send too little and, again, people lose interest. But low open rates can sometimes mean better business. If fewer people open more emails and make more purchases, a lower open rate is indicative of a higher click-through rate - a much more reliable metric. While this is ultimately good for your business, it can also be indicative of improper segmentation. When was the last time you cleaned your house list? In the meantime, hone in on the frequency that works best for your specific market and segment in response to behavior. If it’s time to dump unresponsive addresses, do so. It will only increase your ability to target the subscribers who are receptive and engaged. 3. Find a Niche It’s hard to sustain a consistent frequency when you’re distributing marketing emails every week to your subscribers. Rather than spending your energy on increasing the quantity of emails, try the other route and find the niche that most appeals to your market. Your open rate may rise and fall depending on your specific niche. If you send out emails that really drill down on your market’s desired topic, your open rate should increase. 4. Changes Open rates fluctuate due to several variables, but a constant is always seasonal impetus. Your rates will vary from season to season, month to month and even day to day. Monitor these changes and measure your rates in a way that will help you critique and improve your methods throughout the year. 5. Subject Lines Your subject lines can dictate your open rates. This is often the point at which readers decide whether or not to open your email, so give your emails a chance by crafting seductive yet informative subject lines. Relevancy, timeliness and clarity are the cardinal rules to abide by when crafting subject lines. Remember that more and more of your subscribers will receive your emails on their phones, which allow less space for grandiose greetings.


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5 Tactics that Can Improve Your Delivery Rate

Beyond • May 9, 2011

You have an online business. Of course, for your business to succeed you need a strong, comprehensive email marketing campaign. But, no matter how strong your email marketing campaign, there is no way you can completely control whether or not your email will make it to your target\'s inbox, or that it will be opened when it does. ISPs often change the way they block emails and your readers may have intense security filters set on their accounts. Even though the odds may seem stacked against you, don\'t get discouraged. Here are five tips that can help your email land in that inbox. 1. Spam Checkers Before you click that send button on your marketing email, make sure that you run it through a spam checker. Spam checkers scan you email for any spam \"triggers\" or \"red flag words\" that may prevent them from reaching their destination. Any email marketing service worth its salt should have one, and if you choose to do your email marketing without the help on an outside company, you can find a number of free spam checkers online. 2. Test, and Test Again Now that email is checked on smartphones and mobile devices as often as it is on laptops and desktops (if not more so), it\'s important to test your email on a few different devices and platforms. First of all, testing your email will make sure that it looks good on the screen. Emails that don\'t load properly almost always end up in the trash. More importantly, if there are any breaks in the layout code, a server may mistake your email for spam and send it right to the spam box. Always make sure that your emails are good to go before sending them to your entire email list. 3. More Testing: Subject Lines The email subject line may be the most important part of your campaign. It\'s the first thing that the reader sets their eyes on, and the first impression is always the most important. Steer clear of unnecessary punctuation. Depending on the person who is receiving the email and the spam filters they have set on their account, a single exclamation point, dollar sign or spammy word could kill your email. 4. Help Your Readers Help You Make it easy for your readers to whitelist you. The easier you make it for your audience to receive your emails, the more likely they are to keep opening them. Include a \"whitelist me\" link in your email that leads to a page on your site that shows your readers how to whitelist your emails on popular platforms like Google, Yahoo and Apple Mail. 5. Give Them Options While you may have put a lot of time and effort into making your email look sharp - pictures, video, a slick template - not everyone wants to be visually wowed. There are still a lot of meat and potatoes people out there who want their information delivered to them in the simplest of ways. Give these folks a text only option by adding a link at the top of your email that will direct them to a text only version of your campaign. Like I said, there is no way to guarantee that your email will reach its destination, but the more your refine your emails and learn to watch out for spammy words and red flags, the more often you\'ll hit your mark - and you can be sure your business will benefit.


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Stand Out in the Inbox by Always Arriving On Time

Stand Out in the Inbox by Always Arriving On Time

Beyond • December 1, 2010

So you\'ve worked all week crafting the perfect email campaign. You\'ve surveyed your customers to find out what they\'d like to see in your company\'s newsletters, and you\'ve made sure to include it. You\'re sure you\'ve got the right products, right offer, right sale or even right price. So all your readers have to do is wait by their inboxes and open your email campaign when it arrives, right? Fantasyland Expectations In an ideal world, yours is the only email that\'s ever being sent to your information hungry customers. They flip on their computers, log on to their emails and see your golden message waiting for them all by its lonesome. Heck, while we\'re fantasizing, why not picture that your email campaign opens by itself, prints out on photo paper and walks to your customers\' dining room tables to be read as they eat their morning Cheerios? Let\'s face it, as excited as your subscribers are to hear about your great email offers, most won\'t be expecting them unless you\'ve adhered to the strictest of sending routines. Most likely, your email will arrive along with twenty or thirty other emails, in between news from their bank, a hello from a friend, and maybe a few Facebook message updates. If they are not expecting your email, it could just be lost in the shuffle. Short from sending your readers an email campaign that tells them to look out for the email that warns them of the impending email that announces the big sale email, your customers have no way of knowing when your email is arriving if you don\'t stick to a schedule. Great Expectations Start with a Kept Schedule Do you send out weekly news? Get that email out always on the same day and always at the same time. How about a monthly update? Make sure that it\'s always sent at the same time of month. Do this repeatedly and it will eventually be expected to arrive \"on time\" to your eager readers. They\'ll open it because they know it is coming. There\'s quite a thing to be said for regularity in email campaigns! But what happens if your communiqués are more news oriented? In the case of product news, be on time with it: either first with the announcement or after an expected time demoing the thing. Personally, I subscribe to two web vendors because I can either expect one to be first with tech gadget news or the other to chime in with a review within a week of its release. It\'s easy: I trust them because they literally deliver. Macy Gray Knew It and Wasn\'t Afraid of It Do you remember Macy Gray? She had great crazy style and an even greater hit some years back with the soulful ballad, \"I Try.\" What was even crazier was when she appeared on the MTV music awards with a dress emblazoned with the message, \"MY NEW ALBUM DROPS SEPT 18, 2001 – BUY IT!\" As laughable as some more fashionably snobby celebs might have thought that stunt, one thing was clear to the millions of television viewers: Macy Gray has a new album coming out and we can expect it on September 18th! Maybe you don\'t sing as well as Macy Gray, but you definitely are as committed to your career too. At the moment that you\'ve got your customers\' individual or collective attentions, take the time to announce that you\'re sending something special their way. Okay, so wearing a dress at your place of business that says, \"MY WEEKLY NEWSLETTER DROPS EACH TUESDAY, READ IT!\" might be a bit over the top. But having small, tasteful line-of-sight signage in your store serves as a friendly reminder to your customers that you\'ve got something extra for them beyond today\'s transaction. If you\'re not brick and mortar, unobtrusive pop up light boxes (or even simple text) on your website can be a good way to announce your announcements. Do Your Part and Start at the Start Perhaps the best place to start these expectations is in the sign up process. If you\'re using online sign up boxes, state what you\'re sending and when it can be expected as in, \"Sign up here to get our weekly deals bulletin every Monday in your inbox.\" If you\'re collecting names at a trade show or special event, put the promise on the sign up forms or commit to the schedule before you show up. This way you\'ll have great confidence in what you\'re going to say BEFORE you open up your mouth and start selling. Remember, you could be the greatest salesperson in the world and have the greatest product, but a little expectation goes a long way. Your customers get a lot of email messages, and they all look alike before they\'re opened. Condition them to the fact that your treat arrives dependably and you\'ll have the kind of success that a certain Dr. Pavlov would be proud of!


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Boost Your Email Marketing Metrics by Crafting Great Preheaders

Boost Your Email Marketing Metrics by Crafting Great Preheaders

Beyond • December 1, 2010

The content contained in the top line of an email is known as the preheader, and it is an extremely influential factor that can powerfully drive opens, second only to the subject line. Here are the best ways to get the most out of your preheader. The Preheader Should Support, Not Supplant, the Subject Line The preheader has to be one of the most woefully misunderstood and underutilized tools in the email marketer\'s arsenal. It is most effective when it is used to support the subject line, never in copying it. You might apply the preheader to promote a secondary offer, or count down to a deadline: \"Sale Ends Saturday!\" Consider the preheader just about as important as the subject line, and dedicate as much time to crafting a perfect one. Underline Preheader Links to Emphasize the Fact That They\'re Clickable Keep your preheader succinct and down to a single line. If you need to explain that should the customer have a problem reading the email there is another version on your website (or formatted for mobile viewing), shorten it to \"View Webpage\" or \"View Mobile Edition\". Whenever including links in a preheader, it is good practice to revert back to 1995 Mozilla convention and underline the text in the link. That underline will clearly indicate to the reader that the content is clickable. While on the subject of mobile editions, many email marketers are unaware that left-justifying the preheader makes it prominently visible in both the vertical and horizontal preview panes on the tiny mobile screens. Any content that is right justified will primarily appear on larger screens such as tablets or conventional personal computers (remember them?). The Best Preheaders are Both Introductions and Summaries A proper preheader will be neither too bold nor overly unobtrusive. It is just as bad a mistake to trumpet your preheader in Screaming Scarlet 36-point Bold Italic as it is to turn it into a crypsis wallflower through a 7-point light font in Dove Gray. The preheader is not so much headline as it is both introduction and summary. Some email marketers have become experts in condensing powerful calls to action to fit into an epigrammatic preheader, and it is a skill well worth developing. Another oft-repeated mistake is to place the exhortation to share or forward the email in the preheader. It is both presumptuous and ludicrous to expect your customer to make a determination to pass your email along before they have even opened it and read what\'s inside! Even though you may have your coupon code automatically activated via a clickthrough, including it in the preheader will drive home the message that there is a valuable money-saving coupon inside the email before it is even opened. The Proof of the Preheader is Always in the Testing As in every other aspect of email marketing, the best and indeed only way to determine what works best for your brand is to test, test, and test some more. Just because your major competitor has adopted a particular preheader strategy does not mean that it will work for you. In fact, you have no guarantee that it\'s working for them either! The best preheader is both apothegm and sententia: a concise statement of powerful principle. Harness its potent capabilities and watch your email marketing metrics soar!


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RFM: The Critical Metric Less Than 1/4 of All Email Marketers Apply

RFM: The Critical Metric Less Than 1/4 of All Email Marketers Apply

Beyond • September 21, 2010

A Forrester Research study recently demonstrated that 71% of all email marketers consider click-through rate as a valuable metric while 61% also track open rates. One of the most significant metrics available is applied by less than one quarter of all email marketers. This is baffling since it is one that can provide considerable results. Here is a definition of that metric and how to master it to boost your brand\'s sales. 77% of Email Marketers Ignore the Value of Their Customers. The study revealed that only 23% of all email marketers take into consideration the actual value of their subscribers. Ignoring this critical aspect of your customers\' profiles can be a serious shortcoming as research has proven that: Customers who have made recent purchases are more likely to buy again. Customers who buy frequently are more likely to purchase again. Customers who spend the most money are more likely to make other sizeable purchases. Customers who are most valuable tend over time to become increasingly valuable. Open and click-through rates provided by your email marketing software are not the end-all of performance metrics, as they do not provide data that is finely grained enough about the value aspect of your prospects. The application of another metric can provide valuable insight into consumer purchasing behavior and the overall value of a customer. This metric can also allow for accurate predictions of required inventory and staffing. This metric is known as RFM, and it\'s not just another online radio station: Recency - When was the last time that the customer made a purchase or performed a conversion? Frequency - How many purchases or conversions were made over a set amount of time? Monetary Value - How much money did they spend? These aspects can readily be applied to engagement, thus recency would measure the latest open or click by a subscriber; the frequency would monitor the opens or clicks over a set time period; and the monetary value would represent the money spent over a specific amount of time or other engagement score based on opens and clicks that reflect income to the company. RFM Separates the Valuable Customers from the Effectively Inactive. The primary benefit of RFM metrics is that they allow you to quickly identify your truly valuable customers while separating them from the in-actives. Through the implementation of RFM data, activity scores can be generated for each customer, determining what their true value to your company is. Some of the advantages to your overall campaign strategy that this form of analysis provides include: Greater accuracy in your segmentation Positive reputation as you\'re sending to customers who want to hear from you Decrease in list churn and fatigue Design of a re-engagement strategy to recapture inactive customer interest Targeting the higher spending customers to increase profitability and sales You Can Target Your Brand Evangelists to Solicit Their Loyalty & Advocacy. All of these factors can have a marked effect on the return on investment of any email marketing campaign. The identification of your most valuable customers can lead to an expansion of your marketing reach. After all, these are your \"informal brand evangelists,\" so you can support their advocate activities by: Providing advance access to new products and services Sending product samples to encourage online sharing and blogging Allowing insight into product development and other \"behind the scenes\" peeks Rewarding loyalty with frequency discounts and special offers Surprisingly, the best approach with high value customers is not to barrage them with the same promotional messages you\'re sending off to the rest of your list. They\'re already aware of the virtues of your brand, so you\'re far better off engaging them in personal dialogue about topics that are of specific interest to them. Encouraging direct one on one communication and feedback is going to drive home the message that you know that they are \"special\" and you\'re taking steps to reinforce that relationship. The Lowest Scoring RFM Customers Can Be Offered the Biggest Incentives. RFM analysis also provides valid intel on the subscribers in that vast grey area between evangelists and inactives. By determining their periods of inactivity and their overall response rate, a sliding scale discount offer can be concocted: The largest discount offers go to the least responsive, most inactive customers to encourage their return to activity. RFM is a valuable metric that merits consideration right beside opens and click-throughs in your email marketing campaigns.


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Creating a high impact Email Subject Line

Creating a high impact Email Subject Line

Beyond • July 2, 2009

Every single element of an email – from the permission notice to the footer – plays a critical part in making it to the inbox. However, one carries even more responsibility in getting your message in front of your recipients: your subject line. Short and difficult to manage, this tiny span of less than 100 characters is what your customers and their email clients will see first of your email, sending you on to your customer\'s inbox or the much-maligned junk file. That\'s why perfecting it is mandatory if you want your email marketing campaign to be a success. Here are 6 ways to do that. 1. Clarity of goals Clearly defined objectives set the tone for effective subject lines. Here are some examples of clairvoyant goals, which can be used to write impactful subject lines: Improving open rates Increasing conversion rates Acquiring new customers Promoting products and services By defining your goals early on, you help set the tone for subject line testing. 2. Keep it short Research indicates that readers are likely to find shorter subject lines more credible. Try and keep your subject lines simple and short – preferably four to seven words. 3. Avoid the over-hype You\'re excited about your product and you want your recipients to feel the same: it\'s a fact. But there is a fine line between stirring up excitement and just plain hyping up a product to your customers. Your subject line should speak to the good qualities of your product or service, but avoiding going overboard and making it seem like the end-all-be-all of everything out there. Customers are more shrewd than ever before and they can tell when someone is overdoing it. For this reason, keep your subject line intriguing and exciting, but not too over the top. 4. Just say no to spammy words Certain words and phrases create a negative impression in the readers’ mind and might guarantee instant deletion of messages. Avoid using the following words in your subject lines or your email messages: cialis FREE Reverses aging Free investment levitra Life Insurance valium Your own Multi level marketing Free access xanax Free Samples! For Only Dear Friend Also, don\'t start your subject line with any of these words: Free Hello Buy Buying If you use an Email Service Provider (ESP) like Benchmark Email to send your email, it has a ‘Spam Checker\' tool available for checking your Spam Score for each email campaign. 5. Add a brand name Various recent studies show that email campaigns featuring brand names in subject lines tend to have higher open rates. Use this stat to your advantage. If you\'re promoting three different products, pick the most popular one and feature it in your subject line. You may be surprised at how simple and effective this trick actually is. 6. Be matter of fact If writing your latest email subject line has you tied up in knots, go for the obvious: a generalized description of what your email is or what will be found in it. For instance, “Benchmark Email Bulletin, June 26” is as basic as you can get when it comes to subject lines, but it tells the recipient, probably in the middle of wading through hundreds of spam emails, that your message is the real deal. A straightforward, honest subject line tells recipients that your email, when opened, delivers familiar, trusted content.


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