Tags: preparation

Nurturing Leads Through Podcasting

Beyond • April 25, 2014

Podcasting is a strange beast. It’s a communication medium that is based on the struggling talk radio format, absent the graphic stimuli so necessary for online marketing, and notoriously hard to share via social channels. Yet it continually delivers something that few other marketing tactics can — intimacy with your leads. There’s something about listening in to a conversation that generates an intense connection. A blog post is just a collection of faceless thoughts and ideas. A video turns the person on screen into an unreachable icon. But an audio podcast delivers a sense of being part of a conversation and creates familiarity with the host.(which is probably why so many talk radio aficionados yell back at their car radios). Since the process of any sale — particularly long-sales for high-dollar deals — requires a great deal of relationship building, podcasting can become an invaluable resource for the marketer. By creating familiarity with you, your brand, and your people, it can provide an effective shortcut toward intimacy and lead warming. After all, if a lead is engaging with your podcast, when you call you are simply picking up a conversation that they have already been having with you. So here are a few tips on how to build a podcast that generates meaningful connections with your leads. Dialogue Rather Than Monologue One person talking has a place, and if you are a dynamic speaker it can be very intoxicating to espouse ideas at length. But the goal of the business podcast is to create a conversational thread that you can pick up with your lead on the next call. A lecture generates attention, but a debate inspires participation. Try to keep the discussion as conversational and inclusive as possible Topics Worth Discussing Whether you are interviewing someone or hosting a panel debate, keep the topics focused on subjects you actively wish to discuss with your leads. The result is a conversation that prepares both you and your listeners with interesting discussion angles for your next meeting. A Place They Belong The more your podcast feels like somewhere your leads would feel comfortable participating, the more useful the effort will become for you. This means creating an atmosphere were any idea can be questioned and debated, so that your leads feel comfortable to question and debate when you call. In some case, you may even want to use participation on your podcast as a carrot for hot leads. Few things can positively stroke the ego of a prospect as a chance to be part of the show. Technical Perfection It is essential that no matter how you structure your show, your sound must be flawless. Studies have shown that on YouTube even content with terrible video quality can still garner huge view counts if the sound is good. Invest in condenser mics, record in quiet or soundproof environments, and enhance your sound quality with professional editing. Just because you are an amateur broadcaster doesn’t mean people will tolerate amateur audio quality. Commit If you are going to do a podcast, set up a release schedule and stick to it. If you expect your audience to commit to you, you need to commit to them. This is especially true of business podcasts. Your lead’s engagement with this content can be considered their first experience working with you. How you deliver here is their first indication of how you will deliver when they buy from you. Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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The Top 5 FTC Definitions In Podcaster Pay-For-Play Laws

Beyond • April 25, 2014

Pay for play is not in any way a phenomenon which has first surfaced in the social media podcast age. Payola was common in the vaudeville era of the Roaring Twenties and in 1959 Alan Freed, the DJ who popularized the term rock and roll, faced trial for accepting money to play specific records on the air. When it comes to the Wild Wild Web, podcasters are just as responsible for adhering to rules which prohibit pay for play as anyone working in the more traditional forms of media such as radio and television… and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) wields the legislative sword to ensure that everyone complies. Yes, podcasts are regulated by the FTC The FTC is well aware that endorsements from all types of influential sources are an important factor which assists consumers in making purchasing decisions. That is the primary reason why the Commission mandates that whenever anyone (and that includes podcasters) are sharing content with any audience in the United States which a “reasonable consumer” could interpret as an influence, a disclosure of the relationship with the promoted party will be “clearly and conspicuously” included. There are various definitions of terms included in the FTC regulations which must be clearly understood by all podcasters but these are the five most significant: Material relationships. Also known as material connections, they are the existing connections between a podcaster engaged in endorsements and the marketer of a specified product or service. Deception. The FTC regulations specify that a statement made on a podcast is deceptive if it can be deemed to mislead a “significant minority” of consumers. That is a very critical statement as even if one out of five of your podcast listeners could be seen as being deceived by your podcast you could be in some very hot legal waters. Clear and conspicuous. The placement of the disclosure in your podcast about your endorsement has to be “discernable and understood” by an average consumer. Therefore, whispering your disclosure at 15 dB over the speaker-blasting screaming guitars of your intro doesn’t cut it with the FTC. Endorsers. Podcasters are classified as endorsers as they fall into the legal definitions of “advocates,” “influencers,” or “ambassadors.” Podcasters who receive products at no charge or even at a discount, as well as those who are paid outright are legally endorsers. Endorsement. The FTC assumes that any podcast statement dealing with testimonials or reviews of a product or service fall under the term of endorsement. An extended definition of endorsement The extended definition of what is an endorsement in podcast terms is essentially commercial speech, and the borders between what is free speech and what is commercial speech are extremely tenuous. An individual posting on their Facebook page that they just bought an XYZ-Tech tablet and they absolutely love it is definitely on the side of free speech. However, an individual who is engaged in a profit-making operation through the production of podcasts and who has received either a cash payment or the “gift” of the tablet itself from XYZ-Tech who makes an equivalent statement falls on the side of commercial speech. Could a consumer be reasonably deceived? There is a very fine legalistic distinction in what effectively constitutes an endorsement as the FTC does not necessarily consider endorsements as being specific to their content. Therefore the Commission does not consider a disclaimer statement by the podcaster that “the content of this podcast is not intended to be a review or testimonial” as valid in any way. The FTC determines whether or not an endorsement was actually included in your podcast according to the actual content message which is received by the consumer. If the Commission believes that a consumer could reasonably be deceived by a podcast’s content into believing it was an “honest and uncompensated” review when indeed valuable compensation did exchange hands favoring the podcaster, then the law has been violated. You don’t have to be an infomercial pitchman like Kevin Trudeau to face 10 year jail terms as the FTC considers podcasts equivalent to TV broadcasts, so obey the laws! Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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Podcast 101: Pick Your Cohost, Divide and Conquer

Beyond • April 25, 2014

Thousands of tutorials detail the nuts and bolts of podcasting, but read this beginner’s guide first. Before you devote time, effort, and money to researching and buying the best microphone, posing for an edgy header image photo shoot, setting up your RSS feed, submitting your podcast to iTunes and mastering audio editing software ... make sure that you are set up for success. Lay a strong foundation and develop a clear game plan with these three fundamentals (which apply to virtually any partnership in business or life): Choose the right cohost and partner This step is paramount if your podcast is going to succeed long-term. I recommend having a cohost (vs. going solo) for three reasons: The conversation will be more interesting with two people exchanging ideas and opinions (and ideally a trademark repartee that your three devoted listeners will grow to tweet). Division of tasks and labor – it’s a lot of work. Tap into a shared pool of topic ideas, potential guests, and combined networks for social sharing. Traits of a great cohost: Equally passionate about the subject and committed to the project. Available to devote adequate time. Skilled at complementary tasks. A lover of podcasts – if you don’t enjoy or take the time to listen to others’ podcasts, why should anyone listen to yours? When asked their advice for aspiring writers, many great authors have echoed Stephen King: “I am always chilled and astonished by the would-be writers who ask me for advice and admit, quite blithely, that they ‘don’t have time to read.’ This is like a guy starting up Mount Everest saying that he didn’t have time to buy any rope or pitons.” I listened religiously to tech and marketing podcasts like The Beancast (still my favorite) for years before having the audacity to start my own, The Digital Dive Podcast. Be humble, but don’t be too intimidated – the podcasting community is welcoming and frankly, a pretty patient group; in a world of fleeting attention spans and digital that is increasingly visual (think Instagram vs. lengthy blog posts) I have found a rare sanctity in the commitment required by 30-60 minutes of pure boring audio. Divide responsibilities Five core podcast tasks: Topic preparation and research. Tip: Share an Evernote Notebook with a Note for each episode. Record the conversation. Tip: Always use a separate backup recording device – redundancy = insurance. Edit the raw audio recording into MP3, MP4, MPEG, etc. Upload the audio file to your website/RSS. Write and post the show notes/blog. If one cohost gravitates toward writing and the other toward editing audio, consider assigning standing roles. Alternatively, take advantage of this opportunity to learn all aspects of podcasting, trading duties every episode. (I wish I’d done this from the start.) Depending on the content (do you have to bleep out swearing, did you say something stupid that you absolutely must strike from the record, were your guests heavy breathers prone to whisper then shout, etc.) and the setup (together or separate/Skype/Google Hangout, etc.), the ease of editing tracks can vary greatly. Try every task at least once so you can gain an understanding of the work required. The key is to have ongoing communication and mutual buy-in to avoid anyone feeling overworked. Remember that each episode’s workload will vary. Aim not for equality but for equivalence. Pick a realistic schedule and stick to it Weekly is a fairly typical frequency for a 15-60 minute podcast. Bi-weekly is more forgiving if you routinely prioritize life in work/life balance. Monthly can work well for more evergreen content. It will take longer to grow a following if you publish less frequently, but you don’t want to commit to a schedule that ends up running you ragged or wherein the product suffers. Overall, take the commitment seriously because if you don’t, no one else will. Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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The 4 Primary Podcast Review Aspects

Beyond • April 24, 2014

An inordinate number of podcasts are based upon the reviews of various products, services, digital items, tools, and just about anything that is sold just about anywhere. Whether you’re a n00bie podcaster or can trace your podcasting roots back to the nascent industry in the Nineties, you’d be well advised to brush up on the basics of podcast reviewing to ensure that you’re providing your audience the highest possible value. Use every feature of the reviewed product The first step in podcast reviews seems obvious but it’s really amazing how many podcasters actually fail to do it: Use the darn thing! If I had a dime for every podcast review I’ve heard where the reviewer claims something along the lines of “I haven’t tried this feature yet but it sure must be cool” I’d have Bill Gates in my garage washing my Rolls Royce collection. Unless you have read every page of the publication and/or the product manual, and have physically activated each and every feature in the device you’re reviewing do not even remotely think about hitting the on switch on your podcast recording software! Hit all these points in any podcast review Now that you have actually accumulated real and actual experiences that you can legitimately share with your podcast audience it’s time to ensure that you’re hitting all four of the primary aspects of any review podcast: Unbiased product information. You have to provide the absolute basics such as manufacturer, MSRP, specifications, etc. but you also have to steer clear of statements which can betray bias. So if you’re comparing this product to a similar one that is manufactured by a competitor your criteria better be factual and sustainable, not just “it’s made by Apple so it’s better than everyone else’s.” Advantages. The pros have to be clearly explained and validated. This is yet another situation where you have to be absolutely fair and balanced in your review. The pro can’t be just because you prefer to have the volume button on the lower left, but you have to justify in an absolutely absolute way why that placement is superior to any other. Disadvantages. The cons have to be supported exactly the same way as the pros. While some podcasters will claim that the reviews where they mercilessly slag some poor unsuspecting product are the ones which get the highest audience, it is those very same podcasters who soon garner a reputation as habitual flamers and lose that audience. Summary opinion. Once you’ve gone through all the pros and cons don’t just stop there! Some podcasts seem as if they have cut the ending off where they summarize their review and leave the audience with nothing but a long list of feature opinions. Once you have weighed all the pros and cons is the product worth buying? Would you buy it? Would you recommend it to Grandma? Nothing on sale anywhere is total junk Professional reviewers working in the podcast medium have universally discovered that even if they absolutely hate a product they are going to produce a far more valuable podcast if they remain polite and diplomatic discussing the actual facts about the item rather than descending into rudeness and insult. Nothing on sale anywhere is total junk otherwise no one would have ever bought it. Maybe it’s of inferior quality but it’s much cheaper than the competition, or perhaps it’s an improvement over the previous iteration which was even worse. Not only will your audience respect your opinion more if it is couched in fairness, but you’ll find that other manufacturers are going to be much more amenable to working with you on future reviews, even if the company you last savaged was their own fierce competitor. They’ll figure that if you did it to them, you might give their product the same vitriolic treatment. As a podcasting reviewer you should consider yourself a peer to any major review site or publication. You have to adhere to the primary tenets of all professional reviewers in order to not only provide valuable information to your audience but also to protect your reputation! Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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Beware The Podcast Patent Troll

Beyond • April 23, 2014

Back when electric lighting was a distant dream, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) could be relied upon to register and uphold patents in a legitimate and sustainable manner. After all, when Mr. Bucyrus would file a patent about his corn squishing machine it would be a fairly simple task to discern that it was or was not violating the concept and design of the corn splattering machine filed earlier by Mr. McCormick. When the technological era arrived, the USPTO’s ability to define and protect patents was significantly handicapped. Today, anyone can file a patent utilizing terms that are far too broad and can then harass real or perceived violators. These entities are known as patent trolls, and it may seem difficult to believe but there is one that is threatening all podcasters claiming that the entire technology belongs to them! Personal Audio continues to fire off licensing demands A company known as Personal Audio with an empty office in East Texas has actually sued Apple and scored a couple of victories based on its tenuous claims to have patented playlists. Apparently emboldened by their ill-won gains they have now flailing around their patent number 8,112,504 which claims that they “own” podcasting and any podcaster is in violation of their intellectual property. They have even gone as far as suing three major podcasters, How Stuff Works, Togi Entertainment, and Adam Carolla’s ACE Broadcasting, stating that they are illegally using Personal Audio’s technology. Personal Audio didn’t just stop with those big three podcasters but has sent out licensing demands to many other podcasters and at last report was still firing those off. So podcasters beware if you receive anything postmarked from them! Absurd and ridiculous primary claim The primary claim in Personal Audio’s patent is so absurdly and ridiculously broad that it really defies description or belief. Not just for the brazen chutzpah in even drafting such an all-encompassing patent phrase, but for the “asleep at the switch” USPTO personnel who approved it. Can any reasonable American truly believe that Personal Audio managed to patent: “Apparatus for disseminating a series of episodes represented by media files via the Internet as said episodes become available…” So technically not just podcasts are covered under this crazy patent but also massive internet broadcast operations like Netflix. After all, the distribution of everything between The Honeymooners and House Of Cards falls into the same definition! Personal Audio, not Al Gore, owns the entire internet… so let’s all pay up! Take steps to protect your podcast from patent trolls What makes the entire situation worse is that this 2009 patent is a “child patent” of an earlier one which is technically illegal. Granted, the original patent was filed way back in 1996 but at the time exactly the same system as today’s podcasts was already active and working on newsgroups via UUCP and even before that BBSs in the ‘80s. Regardless you can’t just afford to ignore Personal Audio if they target your podcast, so you should consider taking these steps: Check your local laws. Some states have implemented laws protecting you from patent trolls. If you’re in one of those states you’re going to have a considerable advantage against scum-sucking patent trolls. Get insured. Various insurance companies are offering Intellectual Property Insurance and if you have not yet been served with a licensing demand, you may be able to protect your podcast by insuring it in this manner. Don’t respond. Never ever ever even think about firing off your own reply to any patent troll. That missive can compromise any future case in their favor. Retain a lawyer … and not just any friendly neighborhood attorney but an intellectual property specialist. Some will provide an initial consultation at no charge but if you decide to proceed get ready to shell out retainer mega-sheckels. Most of these patent-infringement suits are settled out of court and in many cases an experienced attorney can diminish the amount of the settlement to the point where their fee is covered by the savings many times over. Unfortunately there is no cheap or free way to fight off patent trolls’ attacks! Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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Interview: How One Guy Got Started with a Successful Podcast Series

Beyond • April 23, 2014

We’re with Justin Salvato of Boxing4Free.com, the founder of site that poised itself a decade ago to teach boxing fundamentals to anyone interested – online and for free. It was a novel idea and Justin had zero marketing experience. So exactly how did he work his way to creating a mini boxing empire over the next ten years? As any fighter would agree, he did it with a combo of guts and the genuine pursuit of a passion fulfilled through a videos, a website, and a podcast. So how does your average guy next door master the fine yet technical art of podcasting? Find out as I sit down with Justin for some podcasting 101 tips. S: How did you get started on podcasting? I mean, where do you start? J: Oh man, it was quite the learning experience. I guess the first thing you need is a podcast host. They will give you space for your podcasts as well as a website for it. I use Podbean. I\'m using their cheap \"advanced plan\" for now. S: Why Podbean over any other platform? J: Price and ease of use, but mostly price. S: Did you need any sort of special equipment? J: You got to get a microphone with USB input for better sound. I recommend the blue mic (it\'s what I got). You can pick one up on Amazon. S: How you do get your podcast out there in the podcast universe? J: You have to set up an iTunes account and submit your podcast to it. Then find other podcast directories and submit your podcast. Try Zune (yes, people still use it), TuneIn, etc. S: How big is your podcast now? J: I know on average each podcast gets about a 100 plays, but that does not reveal how many individual listeners. It could be the same person listening to it a 100 times, though that is probably pretty unlikely! S: How often do you post and how do you decide to organize each post? J: I have a writer on my site, Andrew Schweitzer, who does the podcast. Andrew had asked about doing a podcast. It took some convincing, but after a couple of emails, I was on board. Due to the fact that we both work full time jobs, we couldn\'t settle on doing a regularly scheduled podcast. The podcasts get produced when he finds the time. He records them, sends them to me via OneDrive then I download and edit them. When that is done, I upload them to Podbean and alert my visitors via social networks. We\'ll try to do a podcast once a week, but that doesn\'t always happen. As for the length of the podcasts, I find that people, unless they are fanatical about their interest, are only able to listen to something about 15 to 25 minutes long, so we try to keep them at about 20 minutes and the aim for covering the weekend’s big fight or upcoming fights. S: How do you retain creative control of a podcast you\'re not speaking on? J: I give Andrew a script to read at the very beginning and end of the podcast. I allow him to take the podcast in whatever direction he wants as long as it\'s about boxing. S: Do you invite guests to be on and if so how do you record your conversation with them. J: That is an issue for us and one we haven\'t quite found a solution for. We thought we found an application (program) that would allow us to record a conversation via Skype which I would edit later. As I was editing this particular episode, I found that the two voices were overlaying each other. In other words, while my podcast host was near the end of his sentence, the guest\'s voice would begin speaking before my host was finished. That was a nightmare. I believe the problem was having the conversation recorded locally i.e. on the computer. The fix may have been to have it recorded to the cloud or if possible, on two separate audio tracks, but honestly, this is one area I am still trying to find a suitable solution for. S: How do you compete with all the other podcasts out there? J: Boxing does not have the kind of following baseball or football has so there aren\'t many boxing podcasts out there. However, I find many listeners don\'t just stick to one boxing podcast; they usually listen to several. S: What were your biggest challenges in making a podcast? J: I think my biggest challenge was motivating myself to get started. There is plenty of information available on how to podcast, how to get started, but not all of it is in agreement. That made it difficult for me to get started, because I was overwhelmed and unsure what approach to take, but I ended up with Podbean after another podcaster recommended it. On the technical side, it wasn\'t too difficult; once you have a solid microphone and audio editing program, making the podcast is easy. Thanks so much Justin and Boxing4Free! Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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Pushing the Limit with AdventureCORPS

Pushing the Limit with AdventureCORPS

Beyond • April 22, 2014

In business and in life, we fight personal battles. We tell ourselves what we can and cannot do on a regular basis. Chris Kostman and AdventureCORPS look to push those limits beyond what we ever thought possible. Listen along and find out more about what they do and the lessons that we can take into our everyday lives. Find out how Kostman went from runner to even organizer and the lessons he has learned along his journey.


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The 2 Reasons Why No One Cares About Your Podcast

Beyond • April 22, 2014

Podcasts are the millennial version of “old radio”. It has the power to story-tell, to capture our imagination calling us back for each new turn of the page like those generations before us who gathered for the weekly radio broadcast. This is much unlike “new radio”, whose purpose is to entertain or fill a gap with some talking head. In fact, very few new radio programs have the capacity to pull a crowd like old radio did and podcasts do now. Your Podcast Title Sounds Like it Belongs on a Test Question Here’s a test question: if 1 in 6 Americans has consumed a podcast in the last month, and one in five smartphone owners are podcast consumers, then why isn’t anyone listening to your podcast? The answer probably has a little something to do with your podcast title. It’s either boring or thwarting. The best podcasts sound like they’re catchphrases in a conversation – and you want to be in that conversation. Some of the best titled (and winningly successful) podcasts are “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me,” “James Bonding,” “When Diplomacy Fails,” and of course the podcast that gets us curious based on potential conversation alone, “The Dead Authors Podcasts,” which with great genius relies on what wasn’t said to say what could be said. Of course there’s nothing wrong with a podcast relying on your brand name. If you’ve got a strong brand, like the Nerdist, or are a popular well-loved figure (like most comedian podcasts), then by all means ride those coat tails. Your Voice Has the Monotonous Charm of the Teacher in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Remember the teacher from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, the one known for his classic one-liner “Anyone, anyone”? You two have a lot in common. You’re probably wondering why anyone isn’t listening of your podcast, and it’s probably because anyone would rather be doing anything else than to listen to your extremely boring voice. I hate to be mean, but some people require tough love. The tough love comes from my own first hand experience of listening to some great marketing podcasts out there, but if I didn’t have the will of a sadistic saint, I would have unplugged seconds in. Why? Because the host sounds like that timid kid in the back of the classroom forced to go up and offer a presentation on the mating rituals of monarch butterflies in front of all the mean kids – and right after lunch, when it’s prime time for not paying attention. It’s that painful to listen to. The Silver Lining for a Not-So-Silver Tongue The silver lining here is that your content might be great, but if your voice can’t keep pace with listener expectations, there’s a very high chance you’re losing listeners. To the moaners and groaners out there who are now going to complain with “but I just don’t sound great” or “but what am I suppose to do”, I want to say “but, but nothing”. To quote The Daily Egg’s article on “Is Audio The Next Big Thing in Digital Marketing”, you can romp around in the fact that “audio content has a distinct advantage: audio is ‘eyes free’ content.” This means you don’t have to worry about your messy desk, your frumpled appearance, or another visually grotesque detail. You do, however, need to sound good – you need to harness that silver tongue. You need to sound more than just good: you need to sound infectious. Of course, it helps if you have worthwhile content, but even great content alone doesn’t cut the mustard if your presentation is sub par. To help you jump over this obstacle, I recommend removing your insecurity from the equation. There’s a good chance you’re sounding one way ‘on record’ and another way when they’re in a social environment with friends. Rule of thumb: speak like you’re chatting with your bestie and you’ll come off a lot more convincing and likeable. Most people sound awful because they’re nervous. They’re not necessarily boring people, they’re just boring public speakers. The brilliance of podcasting is that, like radio, there’s really nothing public about it. Remember that you decided to do a podcast because you have something unique to say on your subject and because you know you’re subject well. Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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The Top 10 Basics For Creating A Podcast Media Kit

Beyond • April 22, 2014

If you’ve ever looked into advertising in just about any medium, chances are you received a media kit. These packages usually fulfill the three -ensives: intensive, comprehensive, and expensive. The media kit is essentially the business card for the particular medium, so publishers of all kinds spare no cost in ensuring that their kit is impressive and portrays every possible benefit to the advertiser. As a podcaster you’re no different than the TV-station or the print magazine as an advertising medium, so if you don’t have a media kit yet you should drop everything that you’re doing and get to working on one right now! The ten basics of any effective podcast media kit include: The elevator pitch. Start off your media kit with a very short summary about what your podcast is all about. If you find yourself going over one sentence you’re getting too verbose. The stats. Most advertisers and sponsors are primarily interested in your traffic statistics. After all, the highest quality, incisive and intelligent podcast in the world isn’t worth a plugged nickel if its audience is limited to the podcaster’s cousins. The rates. Welcome to the world of CPM (cost per mille or per thousand)! Every advertising medium is judged on the cost per thousand individuals in its audience, and if you’re not falling into the $20 to $50 CPM range for an average “spot” you’re either selling your podcast too expensively or too cheaply. The options. Perhaps you have regular breaks in your podcast a la radio where you deliver your commercial spots, or maybe you are selling sponsorships for each podcast, series of podcasts, or even segments within a podcast. Be sure to explain thoroughly what advertising and sponsorship options your podcast is open to. The contacts. I once went through a magazine media kit which must have cost the publisher over $10,000 to produce and nowhere in it was any way to contact them, not even an address or a phone number! Don’t commit the same mistake and make sure that you include full contact info. And don’t just plunk in an email address you’re going to drop in a few months! The links. Podcasting is all about social media so you not only have to be literally everywhere on Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, Twitter, and just about every other major network, but you have to have all those links clearly specified in your media kit. The history. What brands have you covered, dealt with, or been sponsored by in the past? Where you’ve been is a clear indication to advertisers as to where you’re going and many can be significantly motivated by a podcast which has been supported by a competitor. The kudos. Are you a premier podcaster in reality or only in your own mind? Prove that you’re a real force in the podcasting industry by listing all the awards and honors you’ve received, excerpts from all the major press mentions of your podcast, and any testimonials especially from industry luminaries. The policies. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) enforces regulations which apply to all podcasters and your potential advertiser is going to want to know how your content policies obey those laws. They certainly don’t want to get caught up in a legal action taken by the government against any podcaster who has violated FTC regulations. The printability. Many podcast media kits are designed to be viewed online but when it comes to anyone actually wanting to print one, it ends up looking like a dog’s breakfast. You can either have your entire media kit in PDF format only (yes, it can include live links) or set it up as a web/mobile page with a link to a printable PDF. You may consider your media kit as your podcast’s resume, summary, or informational package, but no matter how you look at it you can be assured that it is the one aspect which will differentiate your podcast from its competition in the eyes of the advertiser or sponsor. You can’t go wrong with a great kit! Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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Podcast Playlist

Beyond • April 21, 2014

Podcasts make for great listening. In the car on the commute to work, during your work day or even for at the gym. Granted, the latter has lead to some hilarious confusion at the gym. Fellow gym patrons aren’t sure how to react when I’m running on the elliptical while laughing hysterically. I’m sure I look insane. Instead of the standard Spotify playlist this week, I’m going to list some of my favorite podcasts. Enjoy! Doug Loves Movies Comedy Bang Bang Who Charted How Did This Get Made? You Made It Weird WTF By The Way, In Conversation with Jeff Garlin Nerdist Podcast Before You Were Funny Harmontown Please enable JavaScript Powered by Benchmark Email


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