Tags: york

New York Small Business Expo and Top Tips For Standing Out in NYC

New York Small Business Expo and Top Tips For Standing Out in NYC

Beyond • June 3, 2015

This week we\'re excited to be back at the New York Small Business Expo. We love seeing everybody in the Big Apple year after year and it got us thinking. All those folks we meet, why not ask some of the best and brightest in New York for their #1 tip for standing out as a small business in NYC? We\'re looking forward to sharing some of our own tips too. If you\'re in New York on Thursday, June 4th, come stop by our booth or attend one of our two presentations at the Small Business Expo: 2:15 PM Generate the Highest ROI with Email Marketing 3:30 PM How to Effectively Market Through Email @BenchmarkEmail be innovative and think outside the box while keeping cost minimal. You have to stand out in NYC — Brenda Anshanslin (@Cadillac_Creek) June 2, 2015 .@BenchmarkEmail #1 Tip. Be clear about the direction you want to go, always. You save TONS of time and money. If not you drive in circles. — Tiffany Largie (@tiffanylargie) June 2, 2015 .@BenchmarkEmail - Its all about your network! Check out http://t.co/69InO3u9ZT to learn more about how NY is cnxtng small biz with mentors — Business Mentor NY (@BizMentorNY) June 1, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail - Create amazing content that provides exceptional value & give it away! Oh, and email marketing of course ;) — List Popular (@ListPopular) June 1, 2015 One way.....Either offer something unique and different or be really good or great at what you do... https://t.co/7NFrHolzg3 — The Network Journal (@networkjournal) June 1, 2015 Top tip: @BenchmarkEmail would be don\'t be right, don\'t be busy ... Be productive — Jen Lew (@jenlew) June 1, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail Focus on the value you provide your customers rather than worrying about your competition, happy customers = big growth — Daniel Reitman (@DanielReitman) May 29, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail that\'s more than 140 character response my friend. but one can start with persistence — Jacqueline E (@helpbusinesses) May 29, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail Take advantage of everything 311 has to offer small businesses! Too many don\'t and most services are free or low cost! — Lena West (@lenawest) May 29, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail network with small biz owners & orgs that support local startups like @AlleyNYC. They\'ll offer support and help open doors. — Edgar Collado (@EddieC046) May 29, 2015


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According to Your Brain, Social Websites Engage More than TV

According to Your Brain, Social Websites Engage More than TV

Beyond • December 12, 2011

A recent scientific study by NeuroFocus examined the neurological impact of advertising in different contexts and has come up with some startling conclusions about the efficacy of website advertising when combined with the social element. The subsidiary of the giant Nielsen ratings provider, which bills itself as a neuromarketing company, compared the impact of the New York Times, Facebook and Yahoo on test subjects by clinically measuring their brainwaves. If you’re shifting around on your seat from the prospect of marketing researchers tapping directly into your gray matter, you’re not alone. The Brainwave Determination of a Premium Website Experience All three sites were able to garner a greater level of both emotional engagement and overall attention than the average for similar websites. That qualifies them in the vernacular of the researchers to be acknowledged as “premium website experiences.” The qualification as being among the elite premium sites is measured by the researchers as the extent of the neurological response. By measuring the brain wave pattern of the subjects when they were visiting the three sites, they were able to measure: Level of attention Emotional engagement Memory activation These three factors are essentially standalone measurements, as one site may engage a viewer in a powerful emotional manner but fail to make a long term impact and is thus easily forgotten. Therefore it would score highly on emotional engagement but poorly on memory activation. The three sites scored as follows: New York Times – Attention Level: 8.35; Emotional Engagement: 6.2; Memory Activation: 7.25. Yahoo – Attention Level: 8.15; Emotional Engagement: 6.2; Memory Activation: 6.7. Facebook – Attention Level: 8.3; Emotional Engagement: 6.65; Memory Activation: 7.2. We thus see that the New York Times draws a higher level of attention than Yahoo and Facebook but falls to the social network when it comes to engaging the emotions of the website visitor. Yahoo’s content is considerably more forgettable than either Facebook’s or the New York Times, meaning that it fails to make as much of an impact on the centers of the brain that are responsible for filing data away for future recollection. Surprising Gender Findings Although subjects from both genders responded similarly to most of the queries posed by the researchers, there were notable variances. Facebook was seen as resonating more with their own individual needs for men over women (a rather surprising finding), while Yahoo was seen by females as stronger in “advice” and “connecting” functions. Results Are a Boon to Advertisers Everywhere The most significant conclusion of the study is that the websites that creatively integrate social elements into every aspect of their presentations can create a level of emotional engagement that is quite close to the most engaging medium: Television. The budgets required to reach millions of people on television extend into the millions of dollars, with some corporations spending hundreds of millions per year. Therefore, the discovery that an advertiser is able to achieve a similar level of emotional engagement through a channel that is so relatively inexpensive as websites and social media is a major boon to corporate advertisers and small businesses alike. Similar or Greater Emotional Engagement than TV The researchers also measured overall neurological effectiveness to determine “a composite measure of the efficiency of cognitive processing – a weighted combination of attention, emotional engagement and memory activation. One of the most interesting of the various tests was a 30 second advertisement for Visa credit cards that they displayed to the subjects in three different contexts: In a TV pod On a Facebook product page On the Visa corporate website Overall effectiveness was highest on the Facebook page at 6.6, followed by the TV pod display at 6.3, with the Visa corporate site scoring a low 5.8. This significant difference can be attributed to the lack of social engagement in the Visa corporate site over the social network’s page. However, the revelation that the ad in a TV pod is actually less effective than on Facebook is certainly surprising. As creepy as reading brainwaves for marketing purposes may seem, these conclusions are definitely worth examining!


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Occupy Wall Street Spurns Social Media & Online Marketing Attempts

Beyond • October 20, 2011

Recent years have seen reportage on lack of reporting emerge as a growing trend among mass media outlets, and Occupy Wall Street - at least at its outset - largely fell victim to this unfortunate practice. Only after more than 700 people were arrested on the Brooklyn bridge did the movement begin to gain traction with major networks, and still our nation\'s foremost print papers have done a better job of mocking protesters than investigating the source of their unrest. The liberal-leaning Atlantic Wire threw its two cents toward undermining activists, as did The New York Times\' Ginia Bellafante, who condescendingly characterized the occupation of Zuccoti Park as an \"opportunity to air societal grievance as carnival.\" The poor press coverage, in combination with the mismatched multitudes of grievances supplied by protesters themselves, has created a branding issue for Occupy Wall Street, further contributing to confusion about the movement in general. The first step to creating a branding solution is defining the 99%. The School of Public Affairs department at Baruch College recently conducted a survey on more than 1,000 visitors of Occupywallstreet.org. The resultant paper, aptly called “Main Stream Support for a Main Stream Movement: The 99% Comes from and Looks Like the 99%” shows that more than one third of all visitors were over 35, and half were employed full-time, while only 13.1 percent - just above the national average - were unemployed; 70 percent of visitors self-identified as independents, and only about a quarter were full-time students. Both mass media and citizen journalists have attested that the racial makeup of protest crowds is mixed, and men and women are equally as likely to participate. Furthermore, the 99% are not just made up of the 99%: entire blogs have sprung up featuring messages from upper-income earners across the nation asking to pay higher taxes to benefit standards of living for all. The second step is to understand how they communicate their message. In its early stages, a lack of mass media coverage led to a lack of legitimacy for OWS, but kept open the door for citizen reporting and social media. However, though partly inspired by and similar to the Arab Spring, OWS has not seen the same volume of social media interest as that series of revolutions; nor is it characterized by the same type of grassroots enthusiasm apparent in President Obama\'s 2008 campaign. One potential reason lies in the diverse demographic profile of the 99%: they may be older and less likely to have adopted social media presence; they may have limited access to mobile Web technology; or they may not possess the technological savvy to participate. The Baruch College study showed Youtube dominating the expressive modes of the movement, followed closely by Facebook and other blog platforms, with Twitter bringing up the rear. Tumblr is the adopted megaphone for OWS, hybridizing micro and macro blogging platforms to easily share photos, videos and messages across the Web and mobile devices. A final way for activists to establish an OWS brand is to allow an overall ideology to emerge from all the individual grievances: it\'s time to see the forest, not the trees. This is a new type of occupation, drawing upon themes and methods from civil demonstrations of the past, combined with modern media and pared against modern problems. It\'s a difficult - even terrifying - idea for America to wrap its collective head around. By bringing a central idea to the forefront - human rights, for example, or equality as defined by the terms set forth - OWS will become more digestible, palatable and solution-oriented. As media scholar McKenzie Wark put it \"...the most interesting thing about Wall Street is its suggestion that the main thing that\'s lacking is not demands, but process. What is lacking is politics itself.\"


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