Tags: youtube

Top 10 Tips From YouTube Hosts

Top 10 Tips From YouTube Hosts

Beyond • June 26, 2015

This week we had former Big Brother contestant and current web series host of The Weather Channel\'s Brain Storm and his own Nickipedia … Nick Uhas! He offered some amazing advice on following the path presented to you and taking opportunities as they come. We decided to ask some of our other favorite YouTube hosts for their best tips and advice, as well as some things people might not know about doing what they do. Here are some of our favorites: @BenchmarkEmail It\'s all about having a platform where one can express his/her views and opinions with everyone and anyone! It\'s powerful :D — Shimon Das (@shimonips) June 23, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail be patient, create value, connect with your audience, don\'t chase numbers and have fun while growing & learning — Roberto Blake (@robertoblake) June 22, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail thank you! \"Be so good they can\'t ignore you\", never ever give up, stay humble, listen, treat fans like gold, & give back :) — Jenny Kelley (@MissJennyKelley) June 24, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail Deadlines are your best friend and your worst enemy (moreso your best friend) — Alex Hluch (@thealexhluch) June 24, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail Consistency and branding is really important from the start. Having quality equipment / software is a great plus too. — Shane - Shibby (@Shibby2142) June 24, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail I make a list of topics I\'m interested in, then I try to figure out how I would explain that to a fellow friend. — Samuel Molina (@FuKuy) June 23, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail I work, sleep & eat with a small notebook and jot down everything that inspires me. Eventually the ideas start to arrive. — Mark Montano (@MarkMontano) June 23, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail People who watch don\'t know how easy it is to become a YouTube creator. They think it\'s difficult but it\'s not — Ileane Smith (@Ileane) June 22, 2015 @BenchmarkEmail Thanks! Just be yourself, create your unique niche for your channel and engage with your viewers. :) — Austin Null (@thenivenulls) June 22, 2015 What hasn\'t been done, what\'s awesome, who\'s awesome, let\'s all be awesome together! Average is boring😉 #GOTEAM https://t.co/DlVFdRzNEZ — Nicole Arbour (@NicoleArbour) June 19, 2015 Finally, a bonus tip. OK OK … maybe this one was a little tongue in cheek. @BenchmarkEmail Always respond to Twitter @replies from companies or brands asking for advice. — Jeffrey Wisenbaugh (@KoolJeffrey) June 24, 2015 In case you missed this week\'s episode of the Heart of Business with Nick Uhas: Beginnings, Big Brother and Beyond.


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An End in Itself: The New Science of Polarizing Political Videos

An End in Itself: The New Science of Polarizing Political Videos

Beyond • December 20, 2011

Polarization seems to be a prerequisite for the viral success of a political video. While the conventional regurgitations of political positions and platforms fail to draw flies, politicians stuffing their feet in their mouths rarely fail to get the YouTube view-meter spinning. For a political video to go viral requires a very precise perfect storm of circumstances: The video must either offend or elate a significant portion of the population; the mass media has to pick up the story; and the amount of online social media chatter has to become pervasive. Whether the video is widely viewed to be inspirational or idiotic has very little bearing on the number of YouTube views. 1 Second Scream = Millions of Views A single viral video can make or break an entire presidential campaign, as was learned by 2004 frontrunner Howard Dean. After being considered a virtual lock for the nomination, Dean’s candidacy was instantly derailed by a single one-second “Scream” where the 79th Governor of Vermont got carried away by his own primary success in front of a cheering crowd and came off looking like a crazed serial killer, a throwback to 1930s German political rallies or, even worse, a clone of Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer. Brokeback Mountain Jacket In his Strong video, Rick Perry has reached the pantheon of viral political greatness by swiftly approaching 7 million views. His claim that America is now a place “where gays can serve openly in the military but our kids can’t openly celebrate Christmas” has become a rallying cry for the far right to support the candidate and the far left to humiliate him. It can be argued that the image of Rick Perry standing tall in a verdant field was specifically intended to draw the support of the rural right while inflaming the urban left. The fact that the jacket he is wearing is eerily similar to that which Heath Ledger donned as the recalcitrant cowboy in Brokeback Mountain might be just another campaign gaffe or it could be a remarkably shrewd strategic move. As one of the primary goals of a political video is to generate social network chatter, the jacket alone may be responsible for driving a million views. The Goal Is the Sharing From a viral video standpoint it doesn’t seem to matter how many times Rick Perry will “oops” himself into also-ran status, Sarah Palin would refer to “our North Korean allies” and Christine O’Donnell would address the questions of her “witchcraft.” The critical aspect is that enough people will see the video and feel sufficiently motivated to share it with their social clique along with one of the typically short exhortations that have become this decade’s version of a salutation: “check this out,” “this is hilarious” or simply “wow!” It is as if a video’s virality was an end in itself and any tactic is considered fair game, including making the candidate look like an fool. The Infamous Cain “Smoking” Video Herman Cain became the most talked-about candidate in a crowded GOP field on the back of a strange, (purposely?) cheaply produced handheld video where his chief of staff Mark Block lights up a cigarette in the painfully silent closing moments. Although Cain’s campaign may have been later set back by his own personal indiscretions, the effect on his visibility when the video of Block’s smoking was repeated ad infinitum on major news media certainly established the presence of the Godfather’s Pizza king, who in another video drew parallels between himself and another King… this time Martin Luther King Jr. In a viral world where P.T. Barnum’s infamous motto of “I don\'t care what the newspapers say about me as long as they spell my name right” has come to represent a basal campaign philosophy, there may be ample reason to believe that even videos that are pilloried by the mass media and on social networks can be termed successful. By reducing campaign video success to a sheer numbers game of views, drawing attention by any way possible may be the video politician’s new mantra.


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DNC’s Online Marketing Utilizes YouTube, Hulu, Pandora et al

Beyond • October 25, 2011

Politicians are increasingly using the internet to digitize their campaign efforts. The use of online video was critical in the historic Presidential election of 2008, and once again the President’s team is using it to influence the public. In an effort to promote Obama’s new American Jobs Act, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) launched what turned out be a viral marketing campaign on Monday September 12. The governing group of the U.S. Democratic party, the DNC, leveraged the combination of online video and advertisements to get the attention of their ideal supporters in hopes of winning them over enough to get their votes on the American Jobs Act, the President’s new plan for creating jobs throughout the nation. The ultimate goal was directing consumers to a website where they could learn more about the plan. The DNC used a three-part video series to drive its advertising initiatives, which were kicked off with “14 Months,” a TV ad that featured President Obama speaking on the proposed jobs act while reminding us that the next election is a mere 14 months away. Up next was the online ads, starting with “Tomorrow,” a 30-second spot promoting the act through testimonials of consumers speaking on the need for creating jobs. This was followed by “Relief,” the 15-second spot that may have made the biggest impact online. Another video ad designed to highlight the importance of Obama’s plan, Relief ran on multiple sites, including Facebook, YouTube, Hulu, Pandora, the Huffington Post and several other news outlets. Recapturing the Magic Harnessing the power of video and the internet in general is nothing new for the DNC. Having used it successfully in the past, the committee is certainly no stranger to online marketing. It tapped into the resources of the digital channel to score its biggest victory ever and help wrap up the election in 2008. And while the DNC’s success can be attributed to a variety of factors, YouTube in particular was hugely instrumental in the outcome. You may recall that there was a point in the grueling 2008 election when Obama’s chances of winning were slim. Videos of Reverend Jeremiah Wright’s controversial sermons were circulating through YouTube, and public perception of the presidential hopeful was starting to wane. In a strategic move, Obama’s team fought back by promoting a lengthy speech he delivered focusing on race relations to a Philadelphia crowd. Not only did the clip of that speech calm the concerns of voters, it also tallied up well over five million views on YouTube, more than any other video of its kind. By the time election day rolled around, 28% of voters admitted to watching Obama’s videos online. While true intentions are always questionable when political gain is on the line, even members of the Republican party have come out to speak on the brilliance of the DNC’s latest advertising program. All signs are pointing to the digital channel playing an even bigger role in the upcoming Presidential election than it did in the monumental election of 2008.


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Online Is the New TV… According to Tom Brady and Ugg

Beyond • October 4, 2011

A few years ago, analysts were predicting that online video would rise at the expense of TV advertising. While the annual fight for Super Bowl spots is proof that television is still an effective platform for reaching the masses, the popularity of video on the web is something that cannot be argued. And though they are two entirely different mediums, the parallels between online video and TV may not be as far apart as one might assume, according to a new advertising campaign recently launched by footwear maker Ugg. Ugg is perhaps best known for its catalog of unisex boots made of sheepskin. The brand, which got its fashion inspiration from Australia or New Zealand, take your pick, realized it needed to make its products more attractive to men. However, there was a problem: mainly, its long standing reputation for producing furry boots designed for women. To shake that perception, the brand hired international advertising agency M&C Saatchi, and brought in Tom Brady, NFL Pro Bowl quarterback and a real man’s man, as its celebrity spokesperson. Celebrity Endorsement + Online Video + TV = Winning Results In an interesting turn of events, Ugg decided to measure response by running a video of its advertisement on YouTube a week before debuting it on TV. Coupled with aggressive marketing from the PR side, which revealed that the spot would run during the first Monday Night Football game of the year, the video helped build up a decent amount of anticipation, while the TV spot itself was instrumental in drawing men to its website and Facebook page, destinations that were respectively designed to showcase and allow consumers to purchase the brand’s complete line of men’s products. To say that combining TV and online video in an integrated marketing strategy turned out to be a smart move on the part of Ugg would be an understatement. Not only did the initiative help the video generate more than 200,000 views on YouTube, it also helped the brand increase its following on both Facebook and Twitter. Brady’s record-setting performance in the Monday night game didn’t hurt Ugg’s advertising efforts, either. The Michigan Wolverines alumni threw for 517 yards and four TD strikes to lead the New England Patriots in a 38-14 victory over AFC East rival Miami Dolphins. Multichannel Marketing at Its Best The pairing of Ugg and Brady ended up being a winning team, but some pundits are still jokingly questioning the brand’s level of endorsement quality in the masculinity department. Referred to by some as the “golden boy” of the NFL, Brady is often poked fun at for his flowing locks, impromptu flailing-arm dance moves and other traits you wouldn’t necessarily associate with the “manly man” one might picture stomping around in a pair of boots made for the rough and rugged. Nevertheless, the team struck gold, and gave us another example of multichannel marketing done right. What do you think? Is Ugg’s marketing to men a move in the right direction or an “ugh”-inducing misstep?


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Embedding Videos from YouTube, Vimeo and Blip.tv in Your Email

Embedding Videos from YouTube, Vimeo and Blip.tv in Your Email

Beyond • May 9, 2011

Embedding a video is a fast and easy way to enhance your email campaigns. It’s as simple as copy and pasting the video’s URL from YouTube, Vimeo or Blip.tv. Although YouTube is obviously the most popular and probably what you are most familiar with, each site has its benefits. To embed a video into your email campaign, first choose the section of your email you would like to add video to. Click the Edit Block pencil icon at the top of the section… …and then choose Video from the Insert Additional Elements menu that pops up on the lefthand side. Copy and paste the URL from the video you would like to embed in your email where it says Enter the Video URL and click Import. Make sure the proper video is selected from your Available Videos and hit Insert. If you are already familiar with YouTube, there is probably no reason to use another site. YouTube supports up to 1080p and allows you to upload files up to 2GB in size or 15 minutes in length. There may be some practical uses for videos longer than 15 minutes, but their place is probably not in an email campaign. Attentions spans are short these days and your videos should be too. Vimeo used to be the HD alternative for YouTube, but YouTube has since caught up. Now Vimeo is an option for videos exceeding 15 minutes in length. Their free account only allows for uploads of up to 500MB per week and full 720p HD. If you have a need to upload more than that, a paid Vimeo account runs about $60 per year. Blip.tv is more focused on web shows. If you want to include weekly how-to shows or something similar in your email campaigns, Blip.tv might be your best bet. The site is geared towards that and you will get assistance with distribution - and they even have a revenue sharing option in terms of advertising. Unless you have an audience that will sit through longer videos, stick to the best practices of email marketing. Keep the video as succinct as possible while making sure it is still relevant to your campaign and looks professional. A well designed email can be thrown off by a poorly done video campaign. For more information about how to create great video email campaigns, check out this series of posts... How to Make Great Email Videos Series: Making Great Email Videos Part 1: Your Voice Making Great Email Videos Part 2: Your Visuals Making Great Email Videos Part 3: Types of Microphones Making Great Email Videos Part 4: Audio Editing


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Social Media Marketing: Why You Shouldn’t Ignore YouTube

Beyond • May 2, 2011

These days even your grandmother has a Facebook account. So what does this mean? This means that old business models no longer work. With the overnight success of consumer-based businesses such as Amazon and Ebay, the decline of the print publishing world, and with the rise of social media groups such as Facebook and Twitter, it is clear that our society is going digital. The question is where does YOUR business fit into this new model? Clearly, social media is where it\'s at. But when small business owners think of social media, they usually limit themselves to just Facebook and Twitter. Small business owners need to know that there are some great untapped and popular platforms such as LinkedIn, which connects users with other key decision makers in their industry, and Quora, which allows users to field questions to their follower group. However, one of the most critical platforms that often goes ignored is YouTube. Sure, everyone watches YouTube to catch up on their favorite trailers or watch some quirky video, but what sets a great business online marketing strategy (and its subsequent success) apart from a mediocre one is its ability to harness all social media platforms to its benefit. Your business can and should harness the YouTube platform for the variety of reasons listed below: People Like Visuals: People prefer watching a video rather than reading an article. I can almost guarantee that if you have a YouTube video of your business on your home page, it will get watched. Sure, you can embed a video straight onto your site via custom programming. But why stop there? Increase the video\'s traffic and visibility by uploading it on YouTube. Make it easy for people to access and share your videos and they will. Great SEO Source: Many overlook the fact that YouTube is great for SEO tags and ranking. Tag it and then let Google do the rest. Since Google owns YouTube, it gives preference to YouTube tags over any other. Branding Opportunity: Much like the good old days of MySpace, YouTube also allows you to customize your profile channel. Businesses can mirror their profile channel to reflect their page, thereby increasing their brand visibility and creating great user interest. Calls to Action: YouTube allows you to offer multiple calls to action, such as inviting viewer to your blog, asking them to follow you on Twitter and allowing them to engage in discussions with you through comments. In short, YouTube allows for the option to engage in valuable dialogue with your user base and for a discreet marketing opportunity without appearing like a clamoring salesman. Promotion Made Easy: Why is YouTube successful when there are now dozens of video hosting sites? Because YouTube is convenient, easy to use and recognizable. It allows you to embed your videos into your blog, promote them across social media sites and email them to your contacts. Creativity Is Key: YouTube forces businesses to be more creative in their marketing strategy. The old marketing method consisted of an in-your-face commercial, but the new marketing methods have to come across as a story. Stories sell, and spinning your services or product into a story first ensures that the sale will come with it too. Just about every type of business can benefit from a YouTube channel. The only thing you really need is time, a computer and a camera.


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Benchmark Expands Your Video Integration Options

Benchmark Expands Your Video Integration Options

Beyond • March 17, 2010

Video continues to be one of the hottest trends in email marketing. Benchmark Email is proud to announce even greater video email services than ever before. In addition to our established YouTube support, you now have the option of uploading videos from blip.tv and Vimeo. Take the next step in email marketing with by utilizing the three major video providers. Video with Benchmark Email is simple and easy: Click on the video button and copy and paste the embed code when prompted. Video email is a great way to engage your email list. Enjoy these new features and the ROI they should bring.


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