Tags: Content

How conversion heuristics applies to email marketing content 



How conversion heuristics applies to email marketing content 



Beyond • May 17, 2016

Earlier this month, we introduced a new marketing formula introduced at the 2016 MarketingSherpa Summit. It’s called Conversion Heuristics, and it’s defined by the end goal: conversion. C = 4m + 3v + 2(i-f) – 2a The best way to understand the formula though isn’t by the “C” for conversion – it’s at the opposite end; 2a is where the formula starts and the “a” stands for anxiety. So what does anxiety mean exactly? 

When it comes to email marketing, you can’t sell products in an email; you can only sell a click. So when a consumer is at your email campaign, it needs to make sense. All efforts need to get toward the conversion point. And in email marketing, that big “C” looks a little different than it does, say, on your web page. When your reader is in their email, looking at your message, the goal isn’t to get them to buy the product. Buying the product would mean they’re on your website, they’ve put things in the cart and are about to check out, or they’re ready to pick up the phone or contact you via email. On your website, that conversion is about the final point of contact before that consumer is now a customer and invested in your brand. In an email marketing campaign, you’re not selling the final point of conversation. In an email marketing campaign, you’re selling that click to the landing page. That landing page can be your website, it can be a further page in the funnel to get them to convert. Whatever it is, you’re selling the click. Our next question is, what does anxiety look like in an email campaign? In an email marketing setting, anxiety comes in the form of a click. The term “heuristic” in “conversion heuristic” is defined as enabling a person to discover or learn something for themselves, and guiding them through a process to achieve that end. In that vein of thought, each symbol in the equation guides marketers to consider all elements of decision making before conversion is secured. Not having this means your reader is reaching (or has reached) a point of anxiety – in other words, uncertainty. The anxiety can be driven by a number of factors. The most common points of anxiety in an email marketing campaign is content. People think it’s design or brand, but no it’s content. First and foremost your content shouldn’t need Sherlock Holmes to figure out what you’re saying. Your content should be clear and concise, answering the questions of what, why, and who. While some companies answer this question, they lose all imagination when it comes to this. Email marketing is no different than any other kind of marketing when it comes to delivery – which means people still want to be courted. You should dump the info on a plate and push that slush up to your reader, either through a tone that evokes laziness or hurried panic. Neither is appealing, but both do trigger anxiety. Keep your message short and sweet and let the template, graphics and overall design tell someone about the “who.” All you need to worry about is what and why. If your content is longer than the usual email, then give the person the courtesy of providing a direct URL above so they can visit the page or save it for future reading. Offer a list of bullet points at the top or a summary that defines key points in the piece. The idea is that just because you have your reader’s attention, doesn’t mean you don’t owe them the courtesy of treating them like a guest in your digital space. Value their presence and their time to reduce any friction in their experience with your brand.


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Getting More Mileage Out of Your Email Content

Getting More Mileage Out of Your Email Content

Beyond • January 11, 2016

Even a thriving enterprise can hit a content wall once in a while. While you’ve got all the right software, getting custom branded content that meets your goals can be difficult to source from time to time. Yet, there’s a way around this and it’s right in your email marketing campaign archive. If you’ve written original email content, you can turn that content into blog posts. Since your content was initially delivered via email, it’s still going to be seen as original in the eyes of Google – which means you’ve upped your SEO game. At the same time, you’re providing another content piece to an audience that might not yet be subscribed to the blog. To complete the rotation, you can also include an email sign up link within the content at the end of the post, mentioning that this post first appeared in your email campaign. On that note, anything that you’ve produced for email only can make it to a blog: podcasts, videos, and infographics can all be converted to blog content. Once you have it on your blog or perhaps even as a landing page, the next step is to weave it through social media channels to get both audience venues funneled in. There are a lot of benefits to repurposing content. First, it’s economically feasible. Instead of spending man hours or dollars creating new content, and making sure it meets standards, you can go back to something you already have. It can cost, for example, $700-1500 to create an infographic. So first, you should repurpose that infographic at every opportunity. Second, create an article out of it and share it as an op-ed, a guest article, your own blog, part of a campaign, or in another email campaign down the road. You can even create spin off content series from that infographic, with the goal being that you get as much as you can out of that content piece. Why You Should Repurpose Content Repurposing also helps you stay focused on a message by underscoring something that’s important to your organization or company. Any audience needs repeat exposure to a message at least three times before it becomes something they can remember, and seven times before they associate it with your brand. It’s a good rule of thumb to start getting in the habit of repurposing content, which means beginning to create an inventory of your content. This inventory should include the file name, the file, where it’s been published and have some keyword tags to make future searches a lot easier. Evernote is a great way to archive content quickly and easily, though I recommend just one account for all your content inventory needs, rather than having a notebook or a folder for content in another account. You can also create a content goal in order to measure where you’re at and what you’re producing, versus where it’s getting published and how it’s getting received. This elevates your content from just production to performance. It also helps you determine which content needs more mileage or which ones people might want to see converted into another form, such as a video presentation or an infographic, because it was a highly popular subject.


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Creating Member-Generated Email Marketing Content

Beyond • September 17, 2015

Even if you’ve already drafted your ultimate organizational newsletter blueprint, it’s a sound idea to generate email newsletter campaigns that break away from the mold by offering something different. Member-generated email marketing content is a great way to do that – and it’s something that can be done by a variety of businesses. The type of organizations that are best-suited for member-generated email marketing content are non-profits, religious institutions, schools, and other types of collective groups. Yet, it can also work really well for companies that are open about their client pool and want to generate value out of it. In this case, your clients might have something of value to share. They might benefit from the trade of thoughts, ideas and experiences – and you’re the company to make that happen, which in turn makes you more valuable to them. However you decide to approach it, member generated content is resource intensive. Sure, you’re not paying for creating content, but you will be investing time in pitching ideas to members, seeing if they’re interested, guiding their hand through the process until they’re comfortable doing it on their own, generating back up contributors because people will always back out, fail to deliver or not be repeat contributors, and editing. Expect lots of editing. That said, with all the drawbacks, the pros still outweigh the cons. Just keep the cons in mind when planning out your member generated content. Make this type of newsletter something you do quarterly and work out 3 months in advance to give yourself enough time to pull it together and to respect other people’s time too. Also, know that the first run will be very awkward – it’ll be about you learning best practices and how to run a smoother operation next time. Once you’re past all the hurdles, you shouldn’t have the same hiccups and drawbacks the next time around. If you’re still interested, the next question is: what type of content would a member or participate generate? There are a few different ways to approach this too and the best way forward is to offer a variety of content types so your newsletter is diversified. One section could host member announcements while another would feature members in the news. It’s also a wonderful idea to include member-written op-eds on top hitting issues that affect and matter to your organization. And you can also connect members to each other professionally by letting them know of their needs or businesses. And of course, there’s always the easy one that just about anyone can do: photo contributions. What sections you decided to include, and how you plan out each section, needs to be something that’s very careful considered before you even approach a member, participant or client. You want to prime yourself for success by managing who will contribute and how. To do that, you have to really think about who you can reach out to based on their strengths and availability. For example, don’t encourage member photos from someone you know either (a) doesn’t have the opportunity to take great photos, and/or (b) doesn’t know how to take one. Likewise, don’t encourage op-eds from individuals who would fail at it or would make it to personal or require far too much hand-holding. Not factoring in personalities and strengths when approaching others for a member-generated newsletter will only work against you.


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Tips for Writing High Conversion Email Content

Tips for Writing High Conversion Email Content

Beyond • July 1, 2015

Unless you’re a professional writer and a content strategist, you’ve probably come face to face with the dread of writing high-conversion emails for your email marketing campaigns. The first step is knowing how to approach your email subject line. Once you’ve mastered high conversion subject lines, the next step is learning how to write high conversion email content. Though how you approach content will depend on what you’re promoting and to whom, there are several time-tested practices that do not change no matter who your audience is. Writing for Mobile Most users will be reading your email content on their mobile device. In fact, an email infographic by Who is Hosting This, titled “How to Write Better Emails,” gives some tangible figures: 47% of email is opened on a mobile device. 30% of consumers read email exclusively on a mobile device. 68% of Yahoo and Gmail email is opened on a mobile device. For you, this means gearing email content for mobile. A good rule of thumb for mobile email content is to limit your verbiage to about 150 words. That rule stands even when users are downloading the email template and graphics. Your readers are going to want to know why they should further download the full email – and the 150 words is designed to make that sell quickly. According to Who is Hosting This’ infographic, there’s another reason you should keep email content short in light of the high mobile use: smaller screens affect readability. Keeping mobile in mind, you should also give readers the option of click on a link to fully view the email in their browser, which offers greater navigation and an email app would. It’s an Email, Not an Essay There are people who feel frustrated with emails because they don’t know what to say. On the other end of the spectrum, there are people who say too much. Whether you’re writing an email or a newsletter campaign, the goal is to share enough content in the email and ultimately lead them to your website or landing page. You don’t want to give away everything in one email – and you certainly don’t want to write an essay or dissertation, which only causes even the most interested of people to have their eyes glaze over a bit. If you do feel the need to say a lot, then break up your content like you would web content, with targeted sub-headers that offer the value in each bite sized chunk of content. Focus on One Person in the Audience Those with a fear of public speaking are taught to focus on just one person in the audience to help overcome their stage fright. The same rule applies for email. Email content that’s geared like a conversation and written as if it just one person, is far more effective than a blanket statement. People are going to feel like you’re personally reaching out to them. Psychologically speaking, we respond more favorably if it seems like the email is just for us. And your ability to write purposeful and engaging emails can be found through using your natural voice. This means that when you’re emailing, get more granular in how you think about that content. That email is first and foremost coming from you; you’re not hiding behind some agency or corporation. The three tips here all revolve around the end reader. By writing for mobile, you’re considering how they’re receiving that information. By being concise, you’re being thoughtful to how many other distractions are on their plate. And finally, but writing personally, you’re approaching them in a more meaningful and direct way that highlights your value for them as an individual.


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5 Reasons You Should Outsource Your Content

Beyond • March 25, 2015

One of the smartest things I’m seeing more and more companies do is to outsource their content. They may have a great in-house writer, but there’s a realization of and appreciation for the time it takes to craft a really great piece of content. When evaluating whether you should shift content out, consider the following compelling value-driven reasons. Getting a New Set of Eyes When you’re outsourcing your content, you’re relying on an outside agent being able to understand, interpret and convey your product to the public. This means a few things, but first and foremost it means getting a new set of eyes on what you’re trying to sell. If a writer, for example, can’t make heads or tails of what you’re doing or has difficulty conveying value, then that should be a red flag that you’ve got a hole in your ship that needs plugging. Clear communication is key to effective sales and if the professional you’ve hired to sort this out for you fails to understand what you’re selling, then you need to step back and re-evaluate your product. Speaking Like the Commoners This one is especially true if you’re in an industry that’s highly technical or academic, but in which you need to appeal to a general public. Here, the problem with keep the needs in-house means that you’re likely to slip into language that’s not comprehensible to your audience. That language is likely either too technical, filled with jargon that only you would understand – or it’s too high-brow. However, this rule also holds true if you target demographic are millennials, which means you should outsource content so someone who can speak like them, with their slang, and who is up to date with trends. Create Your Voice This great tip comes from Deborah Sweeney, CEO of MyCorporation.com. In a Salesforce blog titled “When Should Your Small Business Outsource Content?” Deborah writes, “You can make a point to seek out one writer or one outside team to work with that will take the time to find and create your company’s voice.” She recognizes that outsourcing might be pricier in some cases depending on what you’re looking for, but these are professionals that can do what an in-house person might not be able to do for you. I would also add that the job of a great writer is being able to find that voice and develop it, and that these great writers will often prefer to work on a contract basis than coming in-house. Bottom Line Dollar Value If your talented in-house writer is doing all the writing, then when are they able to strategize for big picture goals? Further, your brilliant in-house writer is only one person, which means they can only produce a limited amount of in-house copy for their 8 hours on the clock. The rule holds true for both small companies and larger ones. However, if you take a great writer and task them with the job of being a content ring leader, then you’ve got a powerful asset working to get you other assets. So, the role of your in-house mastermind writer should be to recruit and manage a team of writers, strategize content, and make sure every piece of content that comes in or goes out is up to par with their standards. And since they’re a great writer, you know they’ve got this covered. Now, rather than one great writer producing a limited amount of content, you’ve got a team of writers contributing toward increased productivity and efficiency.


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The Top 5 Tips To Consummately Expert Email Content Writing

Beyond • April 30, 2014

If expert email content crafting was easy everyone would be doing it. Follow these five tips to become a consummate email content expert par excellence! A call to action is not a punchline. There you are, crafting a long and detailed email all leading up to the final powerful and impactful call to action. Er… excuse me, are you writing a stand up comedy joke or are you creating email content? A call to action is not a punchline but it is an organic and fully integrated aspect of your email content which should not just be restricted to the last line of the text. Who ever said that the only place to have a call to action is at the end? You should be placing several calls to action throughout the copy as well as peppered liberally through the email layout itself. Keep in mind that an inordinate number of your email subscribers are only going to quickly scan the email and many never even get to the end before their nanometer long attention spans take them in another direction. So if you only have your call to action at the end of your email a considerable number of your readers will never even see it! The proof is in the pudding. Why are you not proofing your email content? Actually better yet, why are you not having a professional proofreader checking every single word that is plunked into your email text? Too many email marketers are working under merciless deadlines and cut to the bone budgets so they think that they can’t afford to hire a proofreader but they’re wrong. You can’t afford not to hire one! Depending on your volume you don’t have to put a proofreader on a full time payroll (unless you’re a huge multinational corporation and then the budget line item is not really an issue anyway), as you can just contract out your proofreading services to someone who works at home on a strictly part time basis. The funds you are allocating to your proofreading efforts are in no way comparable to the loss of respect your entire brand will suffer when your email text looks like it was composed by kindergarten students. Exile emphatic characters. While we’re on the subject of proofreading, restrict the use of lots of UPPERCASE CHARACTERS, emphatic punctuation and symbols ( ! ? -> ), and those dastardly emoticons to the emails you are sending to your kids at college. Those misbegotten radicals of the English language have absolutely no place in your email marketing content so make sure that they never ever ever creep in! Go stuff your keywords… Trips to Cabo San Lucas are most enjoyable when your trips to Cabo San Lucas are in the company of other lovers of trips to Cabo San Lucas who have as much fun in their trips to Cabo San Lucas as you are in your many trips to Cabo San Lucas in the past and the future trips to Cabo San Lucas you’ll have? If you can manage to get your email subscriber to actually get through that keyword-stuffed sentence the next action they will take is to relegate your email to the Junk Folder? What are you doing with SEO keyword stuffing in the first place anyway (have you never heard of Google Farmer, Panda, and Penguin?) and most of all why are you doing that in an email text? Sure, some companies recycle their email text into website Google bot fodder and that’s a wise policy, but regardless of what your final utilization is for your email content you should never even remotely think about writing like a circa 1998 spammer! K.I.S.S. You can never tire of keeping it simple, silly! This last, but most important factor in proper email content creation is massively critical. Don’t overcomplicate anything, but cut everything down to the bone! Get your message across quickly, efficiently, and powerfully! You’re just five tips away to expertly mastering your chosen craft… and you certainly can’t do it without them!


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7 Content Ideas to Fuel Your Inbound Marketing Strategy

7 Content Ideas to Fuel Your Inbound Marketing Strategy

Beyond • March 18, 2014

It is becoming abundantly clear that companies need to change their approach to marketing – outbound is out and inbound is in. With consumers becoming savvier to traditional marketing tactics, it is clear they are no longer buying what companies are selling with their outbound campaigns. With this shift in approach to inbound marketing comes with it a need to focus more on content development and creating content to feed inbound campaigns to provide value to customers and keep them coming back time and time again. 7 Content Ideas to Fuel Your Inbound Marketing Strategy Think of your inbound marketing strategy as a vehicle and your content as the fuel that makes it run effectively. Successful campaigns always keep the tank full of fuel by offering their customers high quality and diverse content across multiple touch points online. To keep your inbound marketing strategy well stocked with content to engage users and nurture your relationship with customers, here are a seven effective ways to keep your content flowing: Blogging: While this may seem obvious, there are still thousands of companies that are not blogging and missing out on its SEO and inbound marketing benefits. Guest Bloggers: Who says you have to write all the content yourself? Guest blogging are a great option for adding another voice and perspective. However, make sure that you use bloggers who add value to your blog and can offer information that your users are interested in reading. Guest blogging for the sake of guest blogging will prove ineffective over time. Answer Questions: Your customers ask you questions all the time. Use these questions to create content. It is simple content to create. All you have to do is listen! Summary/Resource posts: If you find a blog post or article interesting, then it is likely your customers will as well. Keep a list of links to resource your readers would find interesting and put them into a summary post each month. Email Newsletters: Email newsletters are a great way to maintain regular contact with your blog subscribers. The content you can provide is endless – blog posts, promotions, news and announcements, and anything else you think is relevant. eBooks and How To Guides: If a blog post just won’t do a specific topic justice, then perhaps it makes sense to dig deeper into the topic and create an eBook or How To Guide. Fact Sheet/Checklists: Who doesn’t love fact sheets and checklists, right? They are multifunction, diverse, and you can use them for a variety of purposes - features, advantages, benefits, highlighting new products, and anything else you think your users would find interesting. Don’t forget to get social and share all the great content you create for your inbound marketing campaign. Sharing will just help to extend the reach of your campaign that much further.


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Why Your Website Needs A Blog

Why Your Website Needs A Blog

Beyond • July 15, 2013

Having a blog on your website is now an essential component of your online marketing strategy. With the changes that Google has made in recent months with the Panda and Penguin updates, having a solid content strategy is more important than ever before and your blog is the central hub for your websites content development. Regularly updating and adding posts to your blog is the catalyst for many of your marketing strategies. This is the prime reason why you need to have a blog. Here are some other important reasons why a blog is a must: It provides SEO benefits. Content is still king and your blog is one of the most effective ways to continuously add fresh content to your website, which will help you maintain your search ranking.   It’s an easy way to add content. Blogs make it easy to add content. Rather than having to create new pages on your website, all you have to do is log in and add the content. With the simplicity of blog platforms today, if you know your way around Microsoft Word you can easily add content to a blog.   Establish yourself as a thought leader and expert. The more you blog and the more you write about topics within your industry, the better chance that you have of being an expert in your industry.   It will increase website traffic. Having a blog gives people a reason to come back to your website on a regular basis, thus helping to increase new and repeat traffic.   It is great sharable social media content. Ever struggle about what to post on Facebook or Twitter? A blog can easily fix this problem. Once you add a blog post to your website, your next step should be to share it on your social media profiles.   It helps with user engagement. Blogging not only helps to increase traffic to your website, it also gives users another way to engage with your company. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and encourage users to comment on your posts. This will create discussions and get people more involved with your brand. These are only a few of the dozens of ways that a blog will benefit your website and your brand as a whole. If you don’t already have a blog on your website, you need to seriously consider adding one. Remember, having a blog is only the beginning. Once you add it to your website, you need to create content and post regularly to maximize its effectiveness. Happy blogging!


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Avoiding the Inadvertent Email Insult

Avoiding the Inadvertent Email Insult

Beyond • November 3, 2010

Last week we touched upon ways to keep your email marketing text neutral & non-offensive by avoiding key words that can be interpreted to be racist or sexist. Indeed, they were so racist and sexist that we couldn\'t even publish them! However, there are many other ways whereby you may be insulting your readers without using any specifically offensive words. Here are some of the major points. He / She / He/She??? The English language was crafted during a time when it was assumed by both writers and readers that any generic or unspecified gender would automatically default to male. As recently as the 1970s, it was acceptable for discussions of everything from deities to children to be a \"him.\" As our society has developed a more enlightened consideration for gender, the language has unfortunately not kept up with the times. Thus it is difficult to specify generic gender, as in the case of: \"When administering the medicine to your child, hold (his / her / his/her) hand.\" His/her is cumbersome, and the use of either gender can be deemed discriminatory. The only remotely suitable workaround is to phrase the content in the plural: \"When administering the medicine to your children, hold their hands.\" It\'s ugly and awkward, but there are no currently available suitable alternatives. Keep Language Positive Negative language must be avoided in all of your email marketing content. You especially have to be extremely careful about wording reminders so that they do not sound accusatory. Reminding a customer that they did not renew their subscription should never use terms such as \"you neglected to\" or \"you failed to,\" as well as any reference to \"your lack of response.\" It is much more acceptable to phrase these reminders in the form of a question, such as \"did you receive our reminder notice that your subscription is about to lapse?\" Leave the Pontification to the Pontiff It is easy to cross the line into pontification when instructing or educating your audience. Using terms such as \"you must,\" \"you have to,\" or \"do this\" implies that you are commanding rather than informing. That is an approach that is diametrically opposed to the preferable tactic. An email marketing campaign is no place for preaching, moralizing, lecturing or catechizing. Consider your readers as your peers and share information that you believe will be of interest without talking down to them. Shun overly technical or detailed data, but summarize your content in a simple, easy-to-grasp manner that portrays the respect you must have for your audience. Watch the Humor Email campaigns that are lightened by a fun sense of comedy can significantly outperform the dull and straight-laced, but it is very easy for satire to be taken the wrong way by some readers. Self-deprecating humor is also a double-edged sword: Some customers will interpret the attempt at self-zinging humor as a confession of your brand\'s incompetence. Under no circumstance should any national group or profession be singled out in your humor: Any of the old chestnuts about \"a lawyer, a doctor, and a priest are shipwrecked on a desert island\" or \"a Russian, a German, and an Italian walk into a bar\" should be left for Improv Night. Even an extremely minor aspect, such as the position of a hyphen, can change the meaning of a sentence to one that can be seen as offensive. A \"small-business owner\" is the proprietor of a small business, but a \"small business-owner\" is a proprietor who is shorter than average. Today more than ever it is imperative to go through each and every one of your email marketing messages with a fine-toothed comb to ensure that no aspect of the content could possibly offend or insult any one of its readers.


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Wave Was a Ripple, But Google Me May Be the Tsunami

Beyond • August 11, 2010

Wave was promoted by Google as the cloud application that was going to be the last nail in the coffin of email. As Google is now placing the last nail in Wave’s coffin, there are reports of a new, far more capable and effective monster application known as Google Me on the horizon. Google Me allegedly does everything right that Wave did wrong, and it is truly the system that will change the way individuals communicate on the web by supplanting the email paradigm forever. We’ve heard it all before, but the few details that have been dribbling out about Me are certainly impressive. If Me lives up to the hype that Wave failed to, how is email marketing going to fare in a Google Me world? Wave Is Dead, Long Live Me The recent announcement that Google had swallowed its pride and pulled the plug on the much hyped and completely baffling social-network-slash-collaborative-document hodgepodge that is Google Wave didn\'t surprise too many industry pundits. Google\'s Wave was supposed to make email as obsolete as IBM Selectrics. But on the way to the email extermination, the Googlesaurus Rex ran into a Cretinaceous extinction event of its own: You needed a Ph.D from Google University just to understand what the heck Wave was, let alone actually do anything with it. Even Google itself could never really accurately describe it. The cloud-based, multiple-collaborator, threaded-messaging, media sharing, open-social, workgroup-versioning, Wave-extensioning, Brobdingnagian Rube Goldberg machine by way of M. C. Escher was so massively capable that it was effectively functionally inert. There was no end to what you could do with Google Wave, but no beginning either. The vast majority of Wave users were simply flummoxed at how to integrate into their lives this magical, mysterious, wondrous... whatever it was. Me Could Be Erasebook In the end, Wave was not so much tsunami as it was pond ripple. But while the Zuckerbergs of the world were laughing heartily at the Jolly Multicolored Giant\'s social embarrassment, there were signs that the seismic event was going to happen after all - but it would arrive from an unexpected direction. Google Me has been rumored since Betty White was a sophomore, and it seemed that the tough lessons learned from the crashing of the Wave were going to be optimized and applied in a project that could carry the codename Erasebook. Wave + Buzz + Profiles + Orkut x Infinity = Me Google Me is alleged to be the bastard son of Wave with some mixed parentage from Google\'s other underperforming social spawns, Buzz, Profiles, and Orkut. In this incarnation, however, the whole is supposed to be far greater than the sum of its parts, or at least so much has been alluded to by the few insiders who have dared to utter its name in public. Me\'s Integration with Android Is Fearsome If the grapevine proves correct, Google Me will leave a tabula rasa where the social network sphere currently resides. Seamlessly integrating darn near every online function known to homo sapiens - with the possible exception of hacking – Google Me is touted to be all things to all people and thus firmly launches the age where Google owns everything between Mediterranean Avenue and Boardwalk. The one aspect of Me that truly puts the fear of Godoogle into the hearts of any who would blaspheme against the Holy Brinity (editor\'s note: Sergey Brin is Google\'s cofounder) is the integration with Android, which at last report was selling at the brisk pace of 200,000 units a day. The critical mass the Android market is reaching could place Google Me in a Ruy Lopez Spanish Strategy while the rest of the pack is still trying to place their pawns. Email marketers should pay close attention to the information seeping out on Me and take it very seriously. If the application is half as capable as it seems to be at this juncture, the flood of adopters is sure to follow. Although email is not likely to vanish from the Earth anytime soon, Me may open some powerful new marketing portals that could very strongly benefit the early participants.


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